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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Page 13
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 13. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/42.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/42

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 13, May 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/42.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_407m.jpg
Transcript She first fell in love at the age of 14, but her girl friend's parents stood between them. She remembers sitting on her bicycle outside their house all day long. She went to Washington, D.C. and worked in a sandwich shop at night, going to medical secretary school days. "It's hard to write poetry when you're worried about your hose running if you have to go into the bottom filing cabinet. And you always have to go into the bottom filing cabinet." She went to six colleges-- "six bad colleges. I took health and hygiene many times. I really know how to brush my teeth." In 1965, she was a member of the Mattachine Society in D.C, and marched in one of the first gay demonstrations in the world. There was a stiff dress code for the demonstration—suits and ties for the men and dresses and heels for the women. After the march, one of the women noted that Judy's feet were bleeding from the awful shoes, and congratulated her on being a martyr for the movement. Women in Mattachine came and left as individuals; they didn't have any sense of community then. Judy and her lover didn't have many friends, and they blamed it on each other. When she was 25, she got violently ill with encephalitis, went into a coma and nearly died. "When I came to, I was different. I couldn't talk for a while. I was emotionally volatile. Then I decided the old person had died at 25. This new person was going to do risks, going to do what she wanted from then on. "You have to have extreme determination about writing. To personify that I bought a funny hat and a notebook, became eccentric, and hung around where poets might hang around. I told everyone who was interested (that was about two people) that I was a poet. I filled up notebooks with observations. Write—even what seems like trash is practice. Then when you do have something to say, you'll be ready. It's like a musician doing scales." She remembers a teacher once being upset with her because she wrote "Lonely as a bum on a railroad track" in a sonnet. The teacher told her "You can't put the word 'bum' in a sonnet." Judy feels poetry should be socially useful, not something rigid or mysterious or "dilly-dallying with words." Some people put in an extra line that doesn't make sense, just so it'll be 'real poetryl' "That's like throwing an off-key part into a piece of music, so it'll be 'real music.'" In addition, she feels writing has been too long thought to be a middle or upper- class thing. She feels that much of the vitality in language and music has come out of the working class and minority cultures. In 1970 a few women started the Women's Press Collective in Oakland, "When we started I didn't even know how to use a screwdriver," and the press would constantly be breaking down. They put out a beautiful anthology, Woman to Woman, with sheer physical determination. It was printed in a kitchen, where children got jam prints on the books, and their storage place was in the cupboard with the dishes. They discovered that printing illustrations on onion skin involved running the machine very slowly, even to the point of turning it by hand, one by one, as they put talcum powder between each page. Their recent anthology, Lesbians Speak Out, is "completely woman-made, even the binding." It took three years to produce and has the work of 80 lesbians in it. "We were supposed to be a collective but we didn't agree oh anything. So we had six introductions to it." About the Press she says, "It's more a disorganization than an organization. It's a few women who want to be printing women's material more than anything else in the world." - Pokey 13