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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Page 10
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 10. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/39.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/39

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 10, May 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/39.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_407j.jpg
Transcript A REVIEW: Hearts and Minds Focus in on a returned American prisoner of war addressing elementary students. An 8 year old girl asks, "What did Vietnam look like?" The officer in a naval uniform replies, "Except for the people, it was pretty. The Vietnamese are a ^ery backward and primitive people. They make a mess of everything." A North Vietnamese father at the site of an American-bombed civilian village: "Take my daughter's pretty shirt and throw it in Nixon's face. Tell him she is dead and she was only a little schoolgirl." Fade to General Westmoreland: "The Oriental doesn't have the same high regard for life we do." Hearts and Minds is an academy award-winning documentary on the war in Vietnam. The brilliance of this film, however, does not rest on its clear and graphic portrayal of the American participation in that war. It is to be found instead in its attempt to show what in American society so amply prepared us as a people to napalm children, burn villages and destroy crops, in the name of freedom. Throughout the film there is a skillful blend of war scenes and everyday American life. The conclusion which seems inescapable is that the behavior of American men in Vietnam was the loqical extension of the American male mystique. The scene of hiqh school boys in a football locker room, worked into a frenzy by the coach s tearful plea of "Don't let them beat us" takes on a new meaning in the light of repeated military expressions of "We went to Vietnam to win the war." If your feelings as to why the Vietnam war was a mistake are vague, go see Hearts and Minds. But be prepared for more. Be prepared to be frightened. For, in the words of Colonel George Patton III, this country is still producing "a bloody good bunch of killers." - Barbara Cigainero will the woman who hasn't will the woman who hasn't shouted in rage dreaded old age lived in a cage sobbed in sorrow hoped for tomorrow hidden her pain played a man's game regretted her past submitted at last and lied and cried and died please come forward and lead Amanda 10