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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Page 5
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 5. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/34.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/34

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 5, May 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/34.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_407e.jpg
Transcript argument that "the sexual act is for procreation" was promoted by Justinian and he used these arguments as a justification for homosexual oppression/death. Most religions in other areas of the world were more lenient. In the Koran, Muhammed forbade sodomy, but 4 witnesses were needed to enforce the law, and so few homosexuals were actually prosecuted. The Hindus regarded homosexuality as abhorrent but treated the practice with leniency. Buddhists were tolerant, if not accepting. In Japan, it was considered more admirable for a man to love another man than for him to waste his time on "a mere woman." The Zoroasters of the Middle East were closer in belief to Christian tenets. To them, homosexuality was an "unnatural sin" for which there was no way to atone. It was considered worse than "the murder of a good man" and all citizens were given the right, indeed, charged with the duty, of murdering any known homosexual. In the Middle Ages, there was very little distinction between Church and State. The two were so closely aligned that a person who violated the precepts of the Church was considered guilty, not only of heresy, but also of treason. St. Thomas Aquinas justified the persecution of homosexuals with the logic that "right reason declares that the appointed end of sexual acts is procreation." (For this reason, Aquinas considered rape to be a lesser sin than masturbation or homosexuality, since rape at least led to procreation.) The words "heretic," sorcerer," "sodomist," and "witch" were often subsumed under the same category in the Middle Ages. During the Spanish Inquisition, those who were accused of heresy were assumed to be homosexual as a matter of course. These people were burned at the stake, drowned, or buried alive. Throughout history homosexuality and heresy have been equated. In English speaking-countries, the connection between the two is expressed through the use of a single word to denote both concepts, "buggery." Webster's Unabridged Dictionary defines "buggery" as "heresy, sodomy" and "bugger" as "heretic, sodomite." Also of interest is the origin of the word "faggot": fagot or faggot: 1. A bundle of sticks or twigs, esp. as used for fuel, a fascine, or as a means of burning heretics alive. (Webster's 3d Int.) 2. The embroidered figure of a faggot, which heretics who had recanted were obliged to wear on their sleeves. (Oxford English Dictionary) 3. A term of abuse or contempt applied to a homosexual male. Today, in our overpopulated world, the concept that the sex act is for procreation only is still promulgated by such influential groups as the Roman Catholic Church and fundamentalist religions. And so women and men of these religions are denied the right to birth control, abortion and the practice of homosexuality. These churches, while not able to burn offenders at the stake as in the days of the Inquisition, today promise transgressors the fire of everlasting Hell after death, and impose whatever hell on earth they can manufacture for the living. Barbara Cigainero and Linda Lovell Sources: Homosexual: Oppression and Liberation, Dennis Altman. 1971. Religious Roots of the Taboo on Homosexuality, John Lauritsen. 1974. The Manufacture of Madness, Thomas Szasz. 1970. "Homosexual Love", The Origins and Development of the Moral Ideas* Edward Westermarck. 1908. The Holy Bible, King James version. 1611. Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, Alfred Kinsey, et al. 1953.