Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Page 4
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 4. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/33.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/33

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 4, May 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/33.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_407d.jpg
Transcript "Worthy of Death": Rel'igion* and Gay Oppression There are basically two vi sion and censure: (1) homosexual kind, or (2) homosexual oppressi duct of tangible events in human His tor, is a learned have influen The Hetrew people, time allowed romosexua ties, it was attitudes tovfcrd suggest that would be discfcurag1 sexual act woijld. no, Another Hebrew histor alistic peopl chosen ones. The Bib tal intercour ment in Genes bited in Levi whole history being drastically dwindled the destruction of Sodom a remains. Because of wars tion" problem. Power for ality would seem to subver out the Old Testament, the "Sodomites." (See Judges ewpoints concerning the origins of homosexual oppres ity has always been found to be abhorrent to human- on has been limited in space and time, and is a pro- history. ^^lf������^i^^y^ o^^osexuals =S|%h occurs, then, is ''What'/^t^^ll events ;tory.is sketched in the Old Testament, had at one :t or^mpXe^worshig^ some'4uthori- Oo>^ta Exile tt^^JajjSWebrews develops! negative ceetabrfc^^^ to [brews this s in ry nation- of the ual geni- Testain prohi- ed, the ■j iL'pmio uie sueim ui nib? nuniuei uf um uius'mi" lifeople because of unfaithfulness to God {e.g. Noah and the Flood, nd Gomorrah, countless plagues). Always a small remnant and unnatural disasters, the Hebrews had an "underpopula- God's chosen ones would depend upon procreation. Homosexu- t this purpose. It would have to be condemned. Through- re are various references to "the abomination" or to 1:22-30; 1 Kings 22:46; and 2 Kings 23:7). Jewish sex codes were brought over into Christian codes by the early adherents of the Church, most notably St. Paul, who had been raised in the Jewish traditio-n on matters of sex. As a new and persecuted religion, Christianity could not entirely rely upon the conversion of "heathens" for the attainment of numbers. Procreation would play a powerful role in the growth of the Christian Church. Homosexuality would, once again, have to be condemned as an unnatural act. St. Paul brings condemnation of homosexuality into the New Testament in Romans 1; I Corinthians 6:9; and I Timothy 1:10. The most damning condemnation is in Romans 1, and includes, for the first time, a condemnation of lesbianism. It is important to note that, although homosexuality is considered to be absolutely the worst sin by Church fathers, Jesus himself apparently did not consider it worthy of mention. There is also strong evidence in the story of David and Jonathan (I Samuel 20) that a homosexual relationship existed between the two, which was part of the reason for Saul's attempt upon David's life. In Rome, when the Christian revolution was taking place, the Romans openly practiced homosexuality. But when Christianity became the religion of the Empire, a crusade was opened against the practice. In 342 A.D. Emperor Constantius imposed the death penalty for sodomy. Valentinian declared that homosexuals should be burned at the stake and Justinian, hero of law, imposed death by sword. Justinian was terrified by natural calamities which wiped out whole cities. This fear with the