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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985
Page 15
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985 - Page 15. March 1985. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4519/show/4513.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1985). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4519/show/4513

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985 - Page 15, March 1985, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4519/show/4513.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date March 1985
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_285n.jpg
Transcript Living With Fear By Nikki Van Hightower, Executive Director of the Houston Area Women's Center 'twas 5:45 A.M. and the sun had , not quite risen when I stepped outside my front door to begin my morning run. It was a pleasant morning. There were a few cars on the street which were driven, I presumed, by those unlucky people with early morning work schedules. The air was still relatively fresh, not yet laden with the exhaust from heavy automobile traffic. My conditioning as a female made me alert to my surroundings. A low- level anxiety is always there when I am out alone, and it increases or decreases depending on my sense of vulnerability. Usually I felt less anxious during my morning runs, because I mistakenly believed the streets were safer at that hour. While I allowed my mind to wander through the anticipated events of the day, that ever-present sense of for- boding kept me aware of the movement of people and automobiles a- round me. At that hour of the morning most movement generally exhibited a certain urgency as people tried to meet their work schedules. The deviation from that pattern drew my attention to the slow-moving automobile which passed me traveling in my same direction. When the car turned at the next corner, I dismissed my uneasy feeling as a false alarm. It wasn't long before the forboding returned. Out of the corner of my eye I saw the slow moving car once again coming up behind my. Suddenly the driver veered across the on-coming traffic lane and the car came to an abrupt halt at the curb slightly ahead of me. The driver's door was flung open and a man jumped out and moved rapidly toward me. 1 was certain at that moment that the nightmare of all women had just become a reality for me. I screamed as I turned and ran in the opposite direction. My terrified scream in the quiet of the morning shocked even me. It was as if it were coming from someone else. I knew I was going to fight if he touched me. Fortunately, m> "wake the dead" scream woke the dead. Neighbor's doors began opening. The attacker took the wisest course, retreated to his car and drove off. The incident still haunts me. I feel even less safe than I did before. I have great empathy for the survivors of assault, having come within seconds of being one of them. It is the irrationality of the situation which disturbs me the most. I had never met this man before. I had not harmed him. I had done nothing to him to incur his ill will. I was in my running clothes and clearly had nothing of value with me, not even the key to an automobile. So why, I have often asked myself, why did he want to harm me? I was a stranger to him — not Nikki Van Hightower, not a feminist, not a political activist. I held no identity for him, but I represented something that he wanted to hurt. -15-