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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 20. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 20. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4210

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 20, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 20
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File Name femin_201109_518t.jpg
Transcript Recent actions politicize nurses NURSES continued from page 1 The suit will test the legal question of whether the regents had absolute authority to abolish the school, since the UTSSN was "established and created" by the legislature in 1973. It is interesting to note that Regent Joe Nelson, the most outspoken proponent of the dissolution of UTSSN, is a physician. "Dr. Nelson," he sarcastically corrected a nurse (PhD.) faculty member who addressed him as "Mr." during her testimony at the March 26 hearing. Soon after the Regents' action, Dr. Nelson was awarded the Texas Medical Association's "Distinguished Service Award for his outstanding contributions to medical education, organized medicine, and for his civic contributions in Texas." "Your enemy, " former State Senator Bob Gammage recently told UT-Houston nursing students and faculty, "is the TMA." He went on to say "the medical profession as a class—and through its professional associations—has as much or more political clout than any lobbying group in this state or country." And he warned that "over the last two generations they've been accustomed to getting their way." Gammage knows of what he. speaks. He recently lost a primary Congressional race to Ron Paul, a Houston physician, who unethically used TV campaign spots which showed him in scrub uniform delivering a baby. (No one protested.) "The way that nurses have been manipulated, historically, both from within and outside the profession, often reminds one of a hot knife cutting through butter," write Beatrice Kalisch and Philip Kalisch in a current article in the Journal of Nursing Administration. ("A Discourse on the Politics of Nursing.") "Politics concerns the promotion of one's interest group and the use of whatever resources are available to protect and advance that interest," the authors state. "Nursing is a political matter." Nurses, they encourage, must get politically involved. An example of politics in action and, as Redding stated, of nurses being "acted upon" rather than "acting on" was the Training Bill on January 2, 1975 and again on July 25, 1975. "Such high federal spending for nursing education ($650 million over a three year period) would be intolerable at a time when even high priority activities are being pressed to justify their existence," stated President Ford, who is up for reelection next November. Dr. Charles Berry, president of the UT Health Science Center in Houston, shared similar attitudes about nursing education recently. "I do not believe in higher education for nurses," he said. "It only makes the health care delivery system more expensive and just takes money away from the professionals (i.e. physicians)." With the new reorganization (effective September 1), the Dean of the School of Nursing in Houston will be required to report to Dr. Berry. (Before the abolishment of the UTSSN the Dean reported to Dr. Marilyn Willman, a nurse and the system's president. While Berry is calling for "an orderly transition" nurses at UT-Houston are calling it "an orderly takeover." "He wants us to act ladylike," one student nurse said. And, on two recent occasions, Dr. Berry has made it threateningly clear what will happen if it isn't 'lady-like'. "I want to make it very clear . . .the battle is over," he warned nurse faculty members. "If you're so concerned and (yet) you're talking about resignations . . . strikes .. . doing other types of activities that I consider unprofessional and disruptive, I intend to take note of that, I intend to make a record of that Holding up a thick manila folder of records he is keeping of dissidents, Dr. Berry told UT nursing students, "The fight is over . . . but I think some things that have been done were very unprofessional. I think it's worse, by far, for faculty than for students. I think a student has a right to be concerned . . . but faculty should be more professional . . . it's not going to be to everyone's ultimate good." Confirming evidence of the attempt by physicians to control nursing came in the form of a proposed "affiliation agreement" between nursing schools and President's veto of the Nurse hospitals. This directive, as stat- Breakthrough SUBSCRIBE TODAY name. address city state ( ) Check enclosed ( ) Bill me later ( ) Gift Subscription from_ (A gift card will be sent) ROZANNE THATCHER, (far right) state-head of Save Our School, addresses UT Regents, May 14. (I to r) Regents Tom Law, Dr. Joe Nelson, Lady Bird Johnson. ed, would have put both nursing students and their faculties under supervision of a doctor. The proposed policy change was to have been voted on at the May 14 UT Regents meeting, but because of a threatened walk-out by nursing faculty and students, the regents tabled the . issue, saying Dr. Nelson would work with nursing school administrators on re-wording the contract. "It's not going to be that way because nurses are not going to have it that way," said President Marilyn Wilman. "Members of our nursing faculty are professionals, and do not work under physicians." It is apparent that nurses are fighting for their own autonomy while they and consumers are losing the traditional worship of a doctor's authority. According to a new Louis Harris survey, public confidence in physicians has declined drastically in the past decade. In 1966, 73% of the public had confidence in physicians, but as of this year only 42% of the public has confidence in doctors • Earlier this year, the New York Times ran a five-part series of articles critical of doctors. The headlines read: "Unfit Doctors Create Worry in Profession," "Millions of X-Rays Found Unneeded and Radiation is Often Excessive", "Incompetent Surgery and. Needless Death", "Thousands a Year Killed by Faulty Prescriptions", and "Few Doctors Ever Report Colleagues' Incompetence". The issue of malpractice suits and rising insurance rates has also given a bad image to a profession that, in this century, has been given "God-like" status. A nursing student said that Houston her classmates have a way of referring to the first med school course as "God 1". "And remember," she said, "barbers were surgeons only 100 years ago. Nurses ran hospitals." "Before 1912," said Dixie Brown, executive director of the Texas Nurses Association, District 9, "doctors went to hospitals as their philanthropic duty, much the way doctors visit nursing homes today. Until 1940 nurses administered hospitals. "As each health care profession gained its own area of expertise, it sought its own au- tonomy-away from doctors," Pharmacists know more about the interaction of drugs on the body's cemistry, physical therapists know more about the physical functioning of patients' bodies, and dieticians know more about nutrition during illness than doctors—yet doctors prescribe drugs and diets and set physical regimes for patients, Brown said. "Nurses are interested in preventative medicine—keeping the patient from even going to the hospital," Brown added. It is obvious that this idea of health care comes into conflict with doctors who make money from illness, not wellness. Preventative medicine threatens their livelihood. Brown feels that doctors were threatened by their loss of power to other health care professionals and, thus, came down on nursing first because it was "female-dominated" and "politically unorganized." "It is as though doctors fear losing their nearly exclusive franchise on control of the medical industry by granting women equal status and the power of self-determination," wrote Ed Miller in Iconoclast (May 24). Breakthrough PO. Box 88072 Houston.Texas 77004 Miller's article was entitled "The Nurse Question: Handmaidens for Physicians or Independent Health Practitioners?" In a Houston Chronicle story last fall when that question was posed ("To Whom Is A Nurse Responsible?") Dixie Brown of TNA replied, "to the patient". Dr. William Sherrill, immediate past president of the Harris County Medical Society stated emphatically,"to the physician." "The lines are drawn and in the interest of the best patient/ consumer care nurses must get politically organized and use their potential political clout", one nursing school faculty member said. Nurses will be treading on foreign ground for a while because power-politics is a traditionally masculine arena. Kalisch and Kalisch hope, however, that "physicians and other political elites will be re- socialized to some of the nurses' values (and that there will be) greater cooperation (among health professionals) in decisionmaking" to the benefit of the consumer. "Politically speaking," they pointed out "the model nurse is not the quiet, submissive, hardworking individual who makes the best of every situation, but the . . . professional who uses all available resources to advance health care around her (him). The model nurse seeks power . . . to improve patient care in all its dimensions." 20