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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 17. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4207.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4207

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 17, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4207.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
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File Name femin_201109_518q.jpg
Transcript Gertrude Stein opera planned Gertrude Stein wrote an opera libretto about Susan B. Anthony called "The Mother of Us All," and the score was composed by Virgil Thompson. If the University of Houston Opera Workshop wins a grant from the Texas Committee for the Humanities, this opera will be produced in Houston. According to the proposal submitted by Stephen Harba- chick, director of the Opera Workshop, the two-act opera would be followed by a panel discussion on the various questions which the opera provokes. The panel would include Dr. Carolyn Smith, assistant pro fessor of Speech, and director of Academic Information Services at U. H.; Dr. Carol Wiener, lecturer in History at U. H.; Dr. Carrin Dunne, assistant professor in Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas; Helen Cassidy, attorney; and, Nikki Van Hightower, the new Women's Advocate for the City of Houston. The two sopranos who have been chosen for the role of Susan B. Anthony are Mary Frances Langford and Barbara McGinness. Langford is a voice teacher at Houston Baptist University, and a post-baccalaureate music student at U. H. She has MARY FRANCES LANGFORD performed in opera, musical comedy and recital. She has performed numerous roles with the Houston Grand Opera and has appeared as a soloist with the Houston Symphony. McGinness earned her Masters in Music from U. H. in 1975 and teaches at Alvin Community College in Alvin, Texas. She is a soloist at Congregation Beth Israel and at the First Presbyterian Church. In April of this year she performed a recital of arias and art songs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Gertrude Stein was one of the most innovative writers of the early twentieth century. Her prose style can be compared to the impressionist painting of Matisse and the cubist painting of Picasso, who were her good friends. Writing in an unstructured flow of words, Stein ignores conventional rules of syntax and grammar. In the opera, various questions regarding women and politics are considered. In Act I Scene II, Angel More discusses her boredom with her role in life: "Not any more. I am not a martyr any more/ Surrounded by sweet smelling flowers I fell asleep three times./ Darn and wash and patch, darn and wash and patch, darn and wash and patch." In the Interlude, Susan B. Anthony gives her opinion of men: "Men said Susan B. are so conservative, so selfish, so bore- some and said Susan B. they are so ugly, and said Susan B. they are so gullible." The question in Harbachick's mind is: having won the right to vote, have women come to be like men? In Act II Scene II, Joe the Loiterer asks: "Has everybody forgotten Isabel Wentworth. I just want to say has everybody forgotten Isabel Wentworth." ADVOCATE continued from page 1 presented to Mayor Hofheinz prior to his first term of office, by the Harris County Women's Political Caucus, who created the office of Women's Advocate. But contrary to a signed agree ment followed by campaign promises by the Mayor, nothing had been done to initiate such a program. On the matter of involvement with women's problems outside city departments, Van Hightower feels that in the area of job discrimination she- would not take an active role, but would act as an advisor and would recommend procedures such as going to the E.E.O.C or contacting area feminist groups. But Van Hightower does feel a very strong commitment to become involved in various areas affecting life conditions of women in Houston. She is concerned about the plight of women in our local jails, and is particularly interested in helping abused women. She is planning to investigate what she can do in her capacity as Women's Advocate to alleviate the conditions that affect the quality of life for the women of Houston. "Women have unique problems," Van Hightower states. "Our problems are the least understood. They must get attention." She intends to make full use of the media in publicizing her efforts on behalf of women in the community. When asked about the sexist treatment meted out to Channel 2 reporter Carole Kneeland at a press conference with Police Chief "Pappy" Bond (Breakthrough editorial, March 1976), Van Hightower said, "Had I been in office at that time, I would have spoken out deploring the incident (to the press) and would have lodged a strong protest with the Chief of Police. "As Women's Advocate, I feel I now have a voice. I have some measure of authority and I will speak out." BARBARA McGINNESS The question here is clear: while we remember the men of history, have we forgotten the women of herstory? In Act II Scene III, Susan B. Anthony encounters a Black couple and she asks the man, "Negro man would you vote if you only can and not she . . . I fought for you that you could vote would you vote if they would not let me." The question presented here is: what problems do women have in common with minority groups? In Act II Scene V Susan B. brings up the question of marriage. She says: "I am not married and the reason why is that I have had to do what I have had to do, I have had to be what I have had to be, I could never be one of two. I could never be two in one as married couples do and can, I am but one all one, one all one, and so I have never been married to anyone." In Act II Scene VII, Susan B. says of men: "They fear women, they fear each other, they fear their neighbor . . . and so they have written in the name male into the United States constitution, because they are afraid of black men because they are afraid of women, because they are afraid afraid. Men are afraid." This brings up the question of the Equal Rights Amendment. The Mother of Us All is a very important piece of literature and highly relevant in this Bicentennial year. It deserves the support of the Texas Committee for the Humanities. —ADELAIDE MOORMAN UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD BOOKSTORE Texas' Largest Selection of Feminist Books 2437 University Blvd. 527-8522 a: a. UI^LLB ilCLLlMUi© COCKTAILS • 1UNCH ANO D1NNM OPEN ll.-OO AM -11*3 Pm RESTAURANT CUISINE FRANCAISE • SUNDAYS ~ ST. MICHEL MUNCH • BANQUET FACILITIES EitO AAA1 2!S0 RICHMOND AVE DXX-W** I JAt eorrar cf GmitbrUri 17