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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 14. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4204.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4204

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 14, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4204.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 14
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File Name femin_201109_518n.jpg
Transcript Is there equality before God? ANTOINETTE BROWN by Charlene Warnken International Women's Year is over, but the year's concern for the liberation of women in all walks of life has had its effects, including a workshop on "Women in Religion" sponsored recently by the Northwest Houston chapter of NOW. It is significant that NOW is taking an increasing interest in the many problems of women in all denominations, as evidenced by the workshop. Women representing Jewish, Catholic, Episcopal and Christian Church faiths participated in a panel discussion and question-answer session. The meet- int was open not only to NOW members, but to the general public. The Rev. Rebecca Frankford, the only ordained minister a- mong the panelists, told the history of a few women's success in their struggle to attain ordination in the U. S. "The first woman ordained in the U. S. was Antoinette Brown, ordained in 1853 in the Congregational church in South Butler, N. Y.," Frankford said. "Brown had attended Overland College in Ohio, which figured prominently as one of the first colleges to educate women for the ministry." Frankford herself is the first woman to hold a full-time pastorate in a Texas Disciples of Christ church. She has been pastor of Woodland Christian Church in Houston for over a year. "As early as 1739, Wesley had appointed women to be 'class leaders,'" Frankford continued. "Sarah Mallet was a preacher in the early Methodist church in 1787 -- and there were three women preachers in the early Free Will Baptist Churches in the late 1790's and early 1800's. "The first woman licensed to preach in the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1869 was Maggie Van Cott. Women came into greater prominence in the latter 1800's, when Aimee Sem- ple McPherson founded the Four Square Gospel, Catherine Booth 14 co-founded the Salvation Army with her husband, William, and the Women's Christian Temperance Union had its beginning. "By 1894, the Church of the Nazarene listed 20 per cent of its ministers as women," Frankford reported. "In 1881, the Church of God Anderson had listed from 20 to 25 per cent of its ministers as women." Frankford's own denomination has an early history of opening doors to women in the ministry. As early as 1888, the first woman was ordained a Disciples of Christ minister in Illinois. She was Clara Babcock, followed in 1892 by Sarah Crank, a fireball Sunday School evangelist who not only organized 18 new churches, but reopened 16 that had closed. Crank, by the way, was a married woman. "The first woman ordained here in Houston was Bertha Fuller, who was ordained in 1896," Frankford said. "She did most of her work in Arkansas, and was a Disciples of Christ minister." The national office of Disciples of Christ did a study on women in the ministry within its own denomination in 1972- 73. The study showed that j^vomen, not necessarily ordained, but professionally trained, in service in the church in 1962 numbered 288. The number had declined to 202 by 1970 -- and to 189 by 1972. "I don't think we have reversed that trend very much since 1972," Frankford said. "It is due to the decline in church attendance and monies to hire staff. Many churches with a staff of three hire a man for the pastor's assistant, instead of two women which would cost more. But they pay the man more than they would pay each woman." Another speaker was Sister Frances Klinger, a Catholic nun who was the only Houstonian to attend the historic meeting on the ordination of Catholic women held in Detroit last Thanksgiving. "By our baptism we are initiated into a Christian community, a community of service whose members minister to one another," Klinger said. "Part of that ministry is the ministry of the priesthood. Women have not been admitted into this role because of our culture and our society's tradition." Women must "bond together in support of a new priesthood," Klinger said. "That priesthood is one to which we do not necessarily have the right in justice, but one which permits women to be called to the community to minister as priests. The community calls, not the individual. When we talk about women in service in the church and a call to the priesthood, we would hope it would not be simply as a means to gain power, but a means to serve." "Lilith," who was "the first woman created simultaneously and equally with Adam," was discussed by Episcopalian Marilyn Black, program associate for the Houston Region of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The difference between the image of Lilith as equal to Adam and Eve as an "afterthought" who was submissive to Adam can be explained, Black pointed out, by a quote from Lilly Riv- len, who wrote in Ms. Magazine in 1973: "Genesis, which was far more influenced by earlier polytheistic and matriarchal cults than most pious Jews and Christians would Parade on Several women's groups will participate in the Bicentennial Parade in Downtown Houston, July 3 at 10 a.m. Among the representative floats taking part in the parade will be the cast of the Pageant of American Women including Martha Mazeika as Sybil Ludington, Anne Lower as Lucy Stone, Gail Padgett as Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Mast as Elizabeth K. Stanton, Clara Phillips as Sojourner Truth, Mary Lou Heidrick as Mother Jones and Laverne Rich as Ma Ferguson. The World Print Competition, sponsored by the California College of Arts and Crafts, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Arts, will accept entries in all graphic media through August 15. For information, write the competition at 600 Stockton St., San Francisco, Calif. 94108. like to admit, was edited from the sixth century B.C. onward for moralistic reasons. The remnant, 'male and female created He them' (Gen. I), slipped by the editors. The Jewish woman was discussed by Marcia Elefant, director of development of adult services at the Jewish Community Center. "The Jewish woman in America is the heir to a 3,500 year old religious and historical tradition," Elefant said. "Even if she is not a religious observant, she has been influenced by practices she may not follow and attitudes of whose origin she is ignorant." For example, Judaism always has assumed that every woman's sexual drive is equal to that of men. On the other hand, women have been looked upon as temptresses by Jewish men. "Historically, celibacy has been condemned by Judaism, but because woman is thought to be such an object of sex, even today in traditional synagogues she is separated from men by a curtain or balcony." Jewish women have been spared the impact of the "macho mystique" from which most other women have suffered, however, Elefant pointed out. "The Jewish male traditionally has expressed his masculinity in the synagogue and house of studies -- not on the battlefield or through the physical oppression of women. A Jewish wo man never fears her husband hitting her." Jean Bircher, and Episcopalian who will enter the seminary in Berkeley, California in the fall, talked about the kinds of problems women will meet as priests and ministers. She got a strong reaction from her comment that "Some people seem repulsed that it's possible to receive Communion from a pregnant priest." One woman in the audience remarked wryly, "And all these years they've been teaching us that motherhood is sacred!" Bircher also discussed a report on women's role in the church that was conducted by a committee of the Episcopal Church Women of the Diocese of Texas. "They found that women still are fulfilling their traditional roles like teaching Sunday School, but a small percentage are moving into non-traditional roles," Bircher said. "Some women are being elected members of governing bodies such as vestries, but many then are given jobs as secretaries. But 20 per cent of the acolytes in this diocese now are young girls -- and this has come from zero a couple of years ago when they began. "Several women are lay readers -- and in some churches women do distribute Communion. As for the kinds of problems that women will see as priests, they will be similar to those problems of any women, such as the married woman who goes to work." Housing Discri initiation Is Illegal Call: 222-5411 City of Houston Fair Housing Division 331,000 WOMEN will develop Cancer this year Cancer is not only feared, it is very expensive. For Cancer Information, Call BILL SCHOLL 784-4300 WOMEN Cancer is the leading killer of WOMEN age 30 - 54 32,600 WOMEN will die this year from Breast Cancer