Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Page 13
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 13. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4203

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 13, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_518m.jpg
Transcript Arts and Reviews Women's Show ... The great accomplishment of the next twenty-five years will be women's securing complete independence as artists as in all other phases of American culture. Alice C. Simkins, Curator, Marion Koogler McNay Art Institute by Adelaide Moorman American Artists '76: A Celebration is a collection of paintings and sculpture by contemp- ary American women artists. It will be shown at the Marion Koogler McNay Art Institute in San Antonio through July 31. Curator Alice C. Simkins conceived and organized the exhibition. For three years, Simkins single handedly researched and finally selected 56 artists drawn primarily from the east and west coasts, as well as from Chicago, New Orleans, Dallas, and Houston. In a time when content is being disregarded in art criticism, the selections in the exhibition are surprisingly balanced in the number of abstract and realistic works. The co- hesiveness of imagery found in this collection reflects a clue to Simkins' vision as much as it does to any "trend" among American women artists. Janet Fish's "8 Vinegar Bottles" is a Pop still life painting in which light is refracted through the liquid and the glass in gorgeous patterns of color. In Audrey Flack's huge still life Grand Rose, greasy cheese, shiny wine glasses and dewy fruit are juxtaposed with objects such as the Queen of Hearts, a watch, and a Chess Queen . . . objects that have "special meaning" for the artist. It is a double delight of texture and image. "A response to nature as primary inspiration is seen in the work of nearly half of the artists' (works)," Simkins notes, in the exhibition's catalogue. Anne Arnold is working on a series of animal sculptures while Buffie Johnson is doing paintings of plants. Arnold's life-size Hippo's Head, made of stretched, painted canvas over a plywood frame, emerges from the floor—seemingly from water—with its mouth open. "The softness and pinkness of the canvas describe the fleshiness of the throat," says Arnold, "and at the same time perhaps suggest a secondary sexual association." Johnson says, "I have singled out emblems of the ancient Great Goddess in her (role) as 'Lady of the Plants.' Through the series of single-image plants, I have intended to revive the aura of wonder and mystery that was once held for all women as the possessors of magical and life-giving powers." Her Lady Murasaki is a painting of a mushroom. Continuing with the nature theme, the shapes of swimming goldfish can be discerned in a field of colored dots in Nancy Graves' Camouflage Series 2, and in Majorie Stri- der's Orange I , a spiraling oil-on-bronze wall sculpture of an orange peel, she captures an "action that has just occurred ... the fruit picked and peeled There are several pieces sug- getive of female genitalia, apparent even to those who avoid Freudian interpretations. Judy Chicago's Through the Flower: Chrysanthemum, is a sensuous and highly energized mandala-yoni flower. She says, ". . .it is worth it to bid farewell to the safe space of the flower, which, no matter how seductive its scent or soft its petals, has held us and confined us for too long." And in Lyla Katsen's sculpture, Double Rotunda, one piece of curved steel rests neatly inside another while Lee Bontecou's deep relief, constructed of canvas, steel rods and wire, protrudes from the wall surface, with a dark oval aperture in the center. LILA KATZEN 'Double Rotunda", 1975 Art Nouveau exhibited 5 c Loie Fuller (1862-1928) bronze figure by French artist Theodore Riviere on loan from the Schl- umberger Collection, Houston. Fuller was an American dancer successful on the European continent who in the medium of dance (that is to say, real move ment) was the very embodiment of high art nouveau. Illuminated by moving spotlights, she wrapped herself in long veils which rose in whirls and spirals during her dance, producing an almost abstract rhapsody in movement and light. Photos on display PHOTO PORTRAIT OF EVELYN NESBIT Women Look at Women, a Library of Congress traveling exhibit, will be shown at the Pasadena Public Library, 1201 Minerva, through the middle of June. This is a wonderful collection of 75 photographs from the 1890's to the present. Included are a Frances Benjamin Johnston portrait of Susan B. Anthony, Imogen Cunningham portraits of writers Marianne Moore, and Gertrude Stein, and a Judy Dater portrait of Imogen Cunningham. Gertrude Kasebeir's portrait of Evelyn Nesbit and her portraits of Indian couples are among the earliest photographs represented. The photographs of Dorothea Lange and Marion Post Wolcott, employed by the U.S. Farm Security Administration, docu ment rural life during the Great Depression of the 1930's. In the 1940's, Marjorie Collins was hired by the U.S. Office of War Information, to "foster public acceptance of the emergency at hand." She photographed women working as welders, crane operators, "scar- fers" in a steel plant, sand- slingers, and one "New York Department Store Executive Visiting Washington, D.C." From the fifties and sixties, there are pictures of Jackie Kennedy and the Duchess of Windsor, and the Wellesley Girls Crew Team. The seventies are well represented by the enigmatic portraits of women by Judy Dater, and one characteristically strange photograph by Diane Arbus. — A.M. by Sharon Lynn The Rice Museum is currently housing an unprecedented exibi- tion of Art Nouveau, concentrating on the movement as it was manifested in Belgium and in France. The exhibition, which will run until June 27, is co-organized by the Institute for the Arts, Rice University, and the Art Institute of Chicago, where it will have the only other showing from August 28 to October 31. Included are some 720 loans drawn from museums and private collections in Europe and the United States. Art Nouveau was a widespread artistic-socio-political movement which offered a union between handicrafts and machine, breaking down the wall that separated artists and craftsmen. It integrated organic nature with the forms of art and transposed nature into ornament. It is important to note that by concentrating exclusively on Belgium and France, the collaborators of this exhibit, Institute for the Arts Director Dominique de Menil, Institute for the Arts art researcher Susan Barnes, and curator of Decorative Arts in the Paris Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Yvonne Brunhammer, were allowed the luxury of including a wealth of the lesser known pieces of that area. The other pieces included in the exhibit are sources of and comparisons to the vanguard of the exhibit, Belgium and France. I must commend Dominique de Menil, who so adroitly split the space of the Rice Museum into palatable and cohesive sections including furniture, posters, ornamental iron work, porcelain/ceramics, jewelry, glassware, photographs, bookcover designs and illustrations, and sculpture and decorative arts. And I recommend that each of you make this exhibit a must see. It is the most important and exciting grouping of art to come to Houston since the Salvador Dali jewels. 13