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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 10. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4200

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 10, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
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File Name femin_201109_518j.jpg
Transcript Pats and Pans PAT Edith Beychok, chair of Houston WEAL's task force on Criminal Justice, for presenting the task force's request concerning vocational education for women inmates. Appearing before the Harris County Commissioner's Court, Beychok requested that the same vocational training offered to male inmates be offered to female inmates and that proportionately equal space be provided for women at the Rehab Center and other such facilities. We advocate a PAN to Mayor Fred Hofheinz for the timing of his announcement of the appointment of Nikki Van Hightower as Women's Advocate, a post that had been vacant for seven months. He read a one-page statement on her appointment and then proceeded to the major business at hand -- a four- page release on the city's lawsuit concerning the drilling for oil in Memorial Park. PAN- left to all the local TV stations for their low- grade treatment of the appointment. They seem to have it drilled into them that in Texas an oil rig makes a slicker story than a Hightower. A big p ig PAN to the Houston Livestock Show Board of Directors. At their recent election meeting 153 names -- all male -- were submitted as potential board members. The nominating committee selected 11. Carrie Tatum rose to nominate Hazel Herrin, a long-time and well respected Fat Stock Show worker. "It's time to have a lady on the Board," explained Tatum. At this, chair Dick Freeman explained that such a move would prolong the proceedings to the point of delaying the cocktail hour(!). (Groans and boos from the audience.) Herrin then stood up to announce that she didn't want to cause trouble and didn't want to delay the cocktail party. Freeman: "If Mrs. (sic) Tatum will withdraw the nomination we'll drop the whole thing. I hope you don't take it personally - we'll consider it next year." Brand the hides of Dick Freeman and all the Live Stock who agreed with him. Are they afraid they'll lose their 'rocky mountain oysters'? A PAT to the French government for promoting Dr. Valerie Andre, a Colonel in the French Air Force, to the rank of General. . . .Le jour de gloire est arrive! Andre becomes the first woman general in the history of the French armed forces. Two weeks ago, reporters on NBC's 'Meet the Press' interviewed five prominent Blacks: U. S. Representative Barbara Jordan; the Rev. Jesse Jackson of PUSH; Vernon Jordan, executive director of the National Urban League; A. J. Cooper, Mayor of Pritchard, Alabama; and Mervyn Dymally, Lt. Governor of California. It is absurd to think that these distinguished individuals were not interviewed on five separate occasions -- the 'quint'-essence of tokenism (reminiscent of Time's 12 Women of the Year equal One Man of the Year). The following week, the sole guest to 'Meet the Press' was convicted felon, John Ehrlichman. PAN NBC. A PAT on the pate to Priests for Equality, (PFE), an organization of Roman Catholic clergy "committed to equality for women and men in civil society and in the Catholic Church." PFE now has over 1,000 members, hopes for "1,500 members by Christmas, including 20 bishops and 100 priests from other lands." PANtalets to the Lady Madonna Maternity Boutique ad, "We Make Pregnant Pretty." Hadn't thought of it as ugly! Inconceivable. Irma Cuellar, a physical education teacher and volleyball coach at Jackson Junior High School, scores a PAT for filing a sex discrimination charge against HISD with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Cuellar wants female coaches to net as much as male coaches who do extra work for athletic programs in junior high schools. 10 Singer Eric Clapton apparently mistakenly claimed creation of "Give Me Strength", a song which was actually written in 1940 by Louise King, so she claims. Clapton was quoted in Rolling Stone as saying, "I probably did cop it." Tin-PAN-Alley hustler? PAN "The Fine Print", (a column of legal advice in The Forward Times) for assuming in an article headlined "Loss of Family Head Can Bring Trying Times" that heads of families are automatically male. All advice is directed to "the widow", in spite of the fact that approximately 60% of Black heads of households are women. A PAT to Gary Hill of the Chronicle for being on the right track where girls in high school sports are concerned. In a positive article (May 12), Hill points out that the trepidation previously felt regarding Title IX has melted away. "Darrell Royal last June forecast the death of college football. Some parents got the jitters that equality would put their girls in the locker room with boys. It hasn't. Everybody's relaxing. Girls' coaches are seeing resentment of boys and male coaches disappear, booster clubs are discovering there's twice as much to cheer about and the past is dead for a new generation of girl athletes." The following dishonorable discharge came from the mouth of former chief of staff and West Point superintendent General William Westmoreland last week. He said it is "silly" to permit women to enroll at West Point Military Academy. They are "depriving young men of the limited places. Maybe you could find one woman in 10,000 who could lead in combat, but she would be a freak and we're not running the academy for freaks." He said the decision to permit women at West Point was an overreaction by Congress to the pressure of feminist groups. "The pendulum has gone too far," said Westmoreland, who admitted he never would have made such a statement if he were still on active duty. Speaking in general terms, a PAN to Westmoreland. V-e-r-y interesting! The way the print media has chosen or not chosen to cover or uncover what lies behind the nurse-doctor controversy. (After all, health care is our nation's number one problem. Right? Right.) Houston Post medical writer, Mary Jane Shier, winner of so many outstanding reporter awards from the Texas Medical Association and the one who^ gave such fair coverage to the hospital district* side of the JD nurses "sick out" two years ago, told UT student nurses she could not cover their first press conference because it was "too controversial." The nurses reported this to her city desk editor and Shier called the nurses after the press conference, got details and wrote the story that ended with a quote from Dr. Charles Berry, saying, "This is much ado about nothing." (She was the only reporter able to get Berry to call back.) Her photo appears prominently in the centerfold of the current issue of Interface, the UT Health Science Center PR rag. On the other hand, Bo Byers, Chief of the Chronicle's Austin bureau in a front page story (May 30) really got into the legal and philosophical issues of the battle over the role of nurses in hospitals. "At issue," he writes, "is how much voice, if any, a nurse should have in the kind of care given to patients." Ed Miller of Dallas' Iconoclast, also delved into the issue (May 24): "The Nurse Question: Handmaidens of Physicians, or Independent Health Practitioners?" We award this month's bedPAN to Mary Jane Shier. PATs-off to Bo Byers and Ed Miller. PAT Cleveland Amory (Los Angeles Times) for dimming the lights on two superstars. "Robert Redford, on being asked why there aren't better women's parts in movies: There aren't a great many actresses around that carry, that have the intelligence, the wit, the style, the ability, to carry.' The men, we presume, being men, are legion. Charles Bronson, on being criticized for making violent films: 'My own children see violent films and they're not affected by it. They don't do anything violent and they don't break any laws.' Maybe they're too scared." The Southwestern Art Review draws a PAT for changing its name from The Southwestern Craftsman. What's in a name? Plenty. It's more art-iculate this way. A PANg on noting the schedule for the June B'Nai B'rith District 7 Convention. For women, it features a cooking school, an accessory fashion show, a make-up clinic, a Transcedent- al Meditation program and a shopping tour of the Galleria. Meanwhile, back at the convention, males will be discussing high level politics A panoply of PANnikins to the culture of Vietnam, in which "women are considered inferior to men," and to Dan Van De, interpreter for the Refugee Task Force in Dallas. In an article on the ancient custom of bigamy amongst the Vietnamese, De said that young Vietnamese think bigamists are corrupt or stupid -- "It's very difficult to have a good family life with more than one wife because the man has problems with them all the time." PAT to Kathy Lewis for her recent "Let-them- tell-it-like-it-is" article on the Lamar High School Choralettes. PAN Director Lee Keding for his off-key joke about his great-great-aunt at the Boston Tea Party: "She was the last bag they threw over." Reprise the PAN for Keding's sour note insistence upon "elegance" even to the point of always flying the Choralettes first class -- $43,000, for a recent trip to Hawaii. Dash off a PAN to the Office of Vital Statistics of the Maine Dept. of Human Services, which has denied a birth certificate to 10-month-old Cricket Louise Sheppard-Sawyer because of her hyphenated surname. State Registrar Edson Labrack, co-defendant in the suit filed by Cricket's parents, said: "The custom in the United States is that the surname of the father of a child born in wedlock will be entered as the child's name on the birth certificate." Life? Liberty? -The pursuit of 'manliness'! PAT the ACLU for suing the Legal Enforcement Assistance Administration on behalf of several plaintiffs, including Penelope Brace, ten year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, refused a promotion because, a superior told her, "You are not a policeman." The suit charges LEAA with awarding grants to over 50 police departments that practice race and sex discrimination. LEAA recently started the process of cutting off funds to the Phillie Police Department.