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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 8. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4198

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 8, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_518h.jpg
Transcript Hygeia's Hotline Artists cautioned by Wendy Haskell Meyer If you're a sculptor, potter, jeweller, photographer, or painter, if you work with dyes, duplicating fluid, furniture stripper or solvents, if you're etching, soldering, welding, printing, grinding, polishing, glazing or pasting up copy, this message of caution is for you. The American Lung Association has recently issued a warning that professional, amateur and student artists are often unknowingly exposed to toxic substances in their work. Artists, unlike workers in industry whose use of hazardous materials is regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, frequently work in unventilated areas with materials which may be dangerous and whose content may not even be known. Women, working at home more often than men, may thus inhale, ingest or absorb through their skin noxious gases, fumes, chemicals, dusts and abrasives. They may also be setting themselves up for fire. If you spend extended periods of time in art-related projects, you may wish to send $2.24 to Hazards in the Arts, a non-profit information exchange group, at 5340 North Magnolia, Chicago, Illinois 60640, for a detailed pamphlet called Health Hazards in the Arts and Crafts by Bertram W. Carnow, M.D., professor of occupational and environmental medicine, at the University of Illinois School of Public Health. Dr. Carnow not only discusses risks in detail but provides a 19-page list of specific materials—metals, compounds, oxides, acids, dusts, gases and solvents— and descirbes in which arts and crafts they are often used, what organs of the body may be affected and what diseases they may cause. Here are some tips we picked up from Dr. Carnow and from local artists. Whether or not a particular toxic substance causes damage sooner or later (the incubation period, by the way, may be as much as 30 years) depends on individual sensitivity—some people are hyperreactors—age, (children are particularly at risk), how much of that material has already accummulated in the body and what other insults to the target organs—lungs, skin, mouth, liver—may already have occurred. That means, for example, if you smoke and/or live in polluted air, your lungs may experience an additional burden from inhaling lead fumes, paint pigments, and photographic acids and chemicals. Some materials are so dangerous they simply should not be in any artist's studio, says Carnow, putting in this category: asbestos, benzene or benzol (a general solvent for resins and rubber cement), carbon tetrachloride (a general solvent), and methyl butyl keton (lacquer and polyester resin solvent). Most of these are highly toxic to the liver and nervous system. They are often found in various varnishes and lacquers also. Unfortunately, one can't always tell by looking at the can exactly which material is there— the label often says only "contains petroleum distillates." If you're in doubt, work in a well ventilated room and wear long sleeves and gloves. Some metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, nickel, chromium, vanadium and arsenic) in the dry state—sometimes found in pigments used by artists—may not only be more or less immediately toxic but in addition, may be carcinogenic. Aerosols, says Carnow, are particularly hazardous because particles so tiny, less than one millionth of an inch in diameter, may migrate to the lowest portions of the lung and cross into the blood. Most solvents, even those considered safe, such as acetone and turpentine, are highly flammable. A Houston artist recently experienced two frightening fires within a few days. The first time a drop of rubber cement hit a nearby votive candle, flamed and then caught the brush in her hand on fire. Later on, in trying to clean up the congealed bits of burned cement from the kitchen floor, using a sponge and rubber cement solvent, (fortunately she had replaced the cover on the lid of the solvent can) an explosion occurred when the fumes from the floor reached the pilot of a nearby stove. Here are the precautions you should be taking in your studio/ work area: 1. Know exactly what your materials contain. 2. If toxic, use liquid rather than aerosol, solid rather than dust. 3. Store materials in sealed containers (watch out for brushes soaking in solvents). 4. Wash your hands after using toxic materials. If possible, wear gloves. Keep finger nails short and clean, especially if using lead, calcium, mercury or cobalt. 5. Don't smoke near your work. Don't use solvents in the same room with a gas pilot. 6. Don't eat in the room where you work. 7. Keep the room ventilated, cool and humid. This is especially important for photographers using caustic acids. 8. Use goggles when grinding, sanding or welding and masks when working with powders, dusts, aerosols and fumes. Olga Soliz & Associates Management & Planning Consultants 2102WROXTON ROAD HOUSTON, TEXAS 7 7005 713/524-5005^ NANCY KERN, LINDA BOWEN and GLENNA CLOUD Health collective formed Are you alarmed about the state of the air you breathe and the food you eat? Are you angry about being used unknowingly as a guinea pig when you so blithely took birth control pills back in 1964-1972? Are you tired of having to take almost an entire day off from work whenever you need to see a doctor for five minutes? The Houston Women's Health Collective, now forming, is about all of the above and more. They want to see good alternatives develop for pregnant women, from unalienating abortions to happy home deliveries. They want doctors to recognize that women's time is valuable, and cannot be spent waiting hours for treatment; that women will question phys- cians because we want to know about our own bodies; and that the rational judgment of women should be trusted to make our own decisions. They want local daily newspapers to devote more space and energy to keeping women more informed about the latest suspected carcinogens than about the latest Paris fashions. The Houston Women's Health Collective is just forming and plans to take on all of the above. It is organizing an information center and referral service. It will include information on local doctors and other resources, a lending library, and a speakers' bureau. In addition, some members are teaching women's health self-help classes. The topics covered in the self-help classes include the menstrual cycle, vaginal health and diseases, birth control, breast and cervical cancer, and patient rights. Classes are held almost continuously, with the next scheduled class beginning June 21, through UH Sundry School (Registration June 3-10). Their objectives include the following: *to be a focal point for Houston women interested in the issues and problems of health, *to research and spread information about women's health, *to practice self-evaluation and be open to change, *to function collectively and supportively as a group, and to stay small and community-oriented and to encourage the formation of other similar groups. The philosophy of the Houston Women's Health Collective is as follows: "We believe that every person has the right to good health. This right implies certain other rights including the right to a healthful environment, the right to good health care and the right to complete and prompt health information. "We as human beings must be able to make decisions affecting our bodies and our lives; we must be free of economic fears and other pressures so that our decisions can be truly our own; and we must have the power to implement our decisions. "Our focus is women's health because we are women. We know the problems intimately and feel the need for change intensely. "Women are the major consumers of the current health care system. Women are also a majority of health care workers. We want to work with and support any health care workers whose priority is health rather than power or profit or maintaining the present health care system. It is time for that system to stop victimizing us and to begin working with us and for us." If you want to join, help, get or give more information or participate in a self-help class, call 523-9317. JACKSON 6-2691 913 RICHMOND AVE. HOUSTON, TEXAS FIRST LADY I KTJiJby CO. HOOVER & EUREKA Sales and Service DEBRA & DON ALLEN 713/666-1773 6605 Kirby Drive Houston, Texas 77005 NOW OPEN HOUSTON'S NEW SHOP FOR UNIQUE GIFTWARE AND COLLECTABLES CasaJHiqucl 1230 Jackson Blvd. Houston, Texas 77006 526-8956 POTTERY WROUGHT IRON ONYX HAND BLOWN GLASS PLANTERS MAQRAME WALL DECOR 10-6 Tues. - Sun.