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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 7. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4197.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4197

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 7, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4197.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 7
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File Name femin_201109_518g.jpg
Transcript By Leal Reinhart And Tom Sturak The International Road Runners Club based in Switzerland is currently studying the possibility of a marathon for women in the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow. But recent events have confirmed that by rights women should be allowed to compete in the marathon at the 1976 games in Montreal. Last October in Eugene, Oregon, Jacqueline Hansen, a 26- year-old Californian, became the first woman to run a regulation marathon (26 miles, 385 yards) in under 2 hours and 40 minutes, lowering the world mark to 2:38:19. In this race, which drew a field of nearly 100, she finished behind only ten men. The winner, Jon Anderson, a 1972 Olympic competitor, was duly impressed with Hansen's feat: "She was real close to a six-minute pace and that's good for many guys," Anderson said. "A lot of men would be pretty pleased with a time like that." Indeed they would. In the 1972 Olympic marathon, for example, ten men finished in a slower time (the last, in 3:24:21). Hansen's time would have been good enough-had she been male-to win her a place on every American Olympic marathon squad up to the 1960 games. What's more, with 2:38:19, she would have placed among the top six finishers in seven Olympic Games marathons-and would have won five of those races. Hansen is no "freak." Since she herself first lowered the women's marathon record to 2:43:56 in December 1974, two West German runners, Liane Winter and Christa Vahlensieck, respectively, had raced 2:42:33 and 2:40:15. To date, seven different women have officially recorded twelve sub-2:50 marathon performances. All told, probably 25 or more (from at least seven different nations) have broken three hours on more than 50 occasions. Many of these athletes and others coming up will inevitably run much faster. During 1974, for example, two American 13-year-olds, Diane Barrett and Lili Lebbetter ran 2:55:12 and 2:56:07, respectively; and Mary Etta Boitano of California recorded a 3:01:15 at the age of 10! That this emergence of quality women marathoners has taken place only recently makes their achievements all the more noteworthy. Consider, for example, that in the 1973 Boston Marathon, Jacqueline Hansen was the first woman finisher in 3:05:59-nearly half-an-hour slower than her present best time-while Jon Anderson again was the overall winner in 2:16:03, only five seconds off his time this year in the Eugene race. Yet prior to 1970, women of any age were almost universally prohibited from participating at long-distances (which usually meant any foot race beyond two miles). During the late-1960s, a determined handful managed to complete an occasional marathon, racing anonymously (and unofficially) or under defeminizing pseudonyms. As might be expected, their performances were not outstanding- most in the 3:30 to 4-hour range. A turning point came in May 1967 when Maureen Wilton, a 13- year-old Canadian,'was clocked in 3:15:22. Some (male) sports journalists could scarcely hide their disbelief and sought expert confirmation that such a feat by a female-especially one so young- was physiologically safe or even possible. Dr. Ernst van Aaken, renowned sports-medicine practitioner who had long hypothesized that women were physiologically better suited for endurance events than men, responded by claiming that several female athletes in his small town of Waldniel, West Germany, could at any time Women runners denied 1976 Olympic marathon easily run even faster. To prove his claim, Dr. van Aaken quickly organized a certified marathon in Waldniel, which was duly won by 800-meter specialist Anni Pede Erdkamp in 3:07:27. Erdkamp's mark stood until 1970, when Oregonian Caroline Walker, then age 16, lowered it to 3:02:53. With official sanctioning, more women began to run marathons; but still only about 25 had run faster than four hours.. A year later, however, American Cheryl Bridges, a first-class track and cross-country competitor, brought the record down to a respectable 2:49:40; and within another year, some 25 women throughout the world had run within a few minutes of three hours or faster. In late 1973, Japanese-born American Miki Gorman, then 38-years-old, raced 2:46:36. A year later, France's Chantal Langlace shaved this mark to 2:46:16. A major breakthrough occurred in September 1974 at the second International Marathon Championships exclusively for women-held, appropriately, in Waldniel-where some 40 competitors from 20 nations met. The first seven finishers broke three hours, the best mass marathon performance by women to date (later matched at the 1975 Boston Marathon). Even more remarkable, only one of the entrants-who ranged from teenagers to sexagenarians- failed to finish (she twisted an ankle), lending empirical proof tc Dr. Van Aaken's theory oi women's inherent superior capabilities for endurance events. (In the 1972 Munich Olympic marathon, run under similar climactic conditions, 12 of the 74-rhan field failed to finish.) No one argues that the best women marathoners are ever likely to be a match for the best men, no more than they are in any track and field event. For example, after 50 years of international competition, the best women at 100-meters are still roughly 10 percent slower than the best men sprinters. Since the introduction of a women's 1500- meters in the 1972 Olympics, the gap between the best women and men middle-distance specialists has closed to about 12 percent. The best female marathoners currently run about 19 percent slower than their male counterparts,! but this gap is bound to narrow rapidly over the next few years. Consider that 1) men have been engaged in international marathoning for over 80 years; and 2) that over the past 40 years, the men's marathon record has come down barely 20 minutes, whereas since 1967 the women's has fallen nearly 30 minutes. Races create runners and opportunity develops talent. As more women continue to run more marathons, times continue to drop. All of which seems to soundly refute the argument that women have neither the strength for nor the interest in running- long distances. For example, the third annual National AAU Womens' Marathon Championships held recently in New York's Central Park attracted a field of 44 runners. Though several top-ranked athletes were unable to compete (including Jacqueline Hansen and defending champion Judy Ikenberry), the results were impressive. The race was won by 20-year-old Kim Meritt in 2:46:14-fifth best ever by a woman-over a difficult course. Second in 2:53:02 was Miki Gorman-now 40-years-old- running her first marathon since giving birth to a baby eight months previously.(Gorman has since lowered the women's veterans record to 2:47:45.) The next three finishers also came in under three hours. Most recently, the conservative Amateur Athletic Association of Great Britain staged its first marathon championships for women. The event drew over 30 competitors and was won in around three hours. Since it was only in 1972 that a 1500-meters (less than one mile) race was added to the women's Olympic schedule, the fact that a marathon study for the 1980 games is even being done might be viewed as nothing short of miraculous. But for today's top women marathoners throughout the world, who have put in years of endless training miles and have recorded dozens of respectable performances, the possibility of competing in Moscow four years hence is small consolation. Olympic officialdom may argue that it is simply too late to include a women's marathon next year's schedule for Montreal. But what's to prevent allowing each nation to enter three qualified women (those who have run, say, under three hours) to compete in an integrated marathon? No change in the present program would have to be made to accomodate these women marathoners. And odds are that no official or spectator would have to wait for one of them to stagger into the stadium dead last. ^ C«me.t><£yiiO' V k frtt -T(^/eu»i<, 6ft>ui> fcAO ujj^ owyfcjy J7we ir>rito& ^outb <W ©nTaWMt, I V\ovxrs •' Hon.*Tujts \o t»m ^'A S f>tn Wed,. AVurxi Sdt tOam V\ nV-An^M 7o8 Ww DANIEL BOONE CYCLES 5318 Crawford 526-7011 JOY BOONE and SARAH PIPAS Women who know bicycles