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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 5. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4195.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4195

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 5, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4195.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_518e.jpg
Transcript RON COX AND DAUGHTER HEATHER Non-sexist dad The big, bad wolf "huffs and puffs" in falsetto, according to Ron Cox's version of the "Three Little Pigs." In fact, all the characters in traditional children's stories have undergone a biological change since he began reading to his 31/2 year-old daughter, Heather. "We change each 'he' and 'his' in the reading books to 'she' and 'her.," Cox explains, "so Heather can potentially see herself in any of those situations—so she will not feel molded into a particular role." Cox, a 35-year-old investment planner with Exxon, as well as a co-founder of the Male Awareness Center of Houston, says he spends most of his after-work hours with Heather. "We play 'cowboys and Indians' (an outside influence) which I'm trying to change to 'ranchers and cowhands'," Cox explains. "We make teepees in the livingroom or I play a horse and she gets on my back. "I'm a swimmer so we swim a lot. I remember an incident at a swimming pool when Heather was two years old," says Cox. "She was wearing only bathing trunks (no top) and a little boy approached her, asking if she was a boy or a girl. Heather responded proudly, "I'm a little kid!" Cox recalls reading a book on parent effectiveness training that suggested treating children as adults. "One night I came home from work and sat down with the newspaper. Heather came up, hit the paper and said, 'I want to play with you, Daddy.' I explained I was reading the paper—why didn't she do something else. She left but returned a few minutes later with the same action and request. This went on two or three times until I finally said, 'You're making me mad—I want to read the paper.' To which she replied, 'You're making me mad, too-1 want to play!' "It was so beautifully done, I had to give in. It works both ways." Cox feels Heather helps him re-educate himself and re-consider his value system. "She wanted to put ketchup in her milk," recalls Cox, "and since I don't particularly like either of those things separately, much less together, I said 'don't do that'. She looked at me and asked why. That nice little innocent 'why' put me thinking back. "When my parents, for example, told me 'don't', I accepted that, never questioned it. It's amazing how often I learn from her questions and realize that my set of values is not the same as hers—and shouldn't be forced on her, an individual." With both parents involved in the men's and women's movements (Heather's mother, Dot- tie, is an active feminist), Heather attends a child care center. Having a daughter-child, Cox tries not to be "overprotective. One day at school I saw her climb high and flip over and off the monkey bars to the ground. I held my breath until she landed safely. "However, she did come home one day saying she wanted to be a boy, to 'do what the big boys do.' It turned out that she saw only the boys climbing trees—many of the other girls couldn't since they were wearing dresses." Cox believes that men should spend less time out of the home, and women, less time in the home. "A child sees the mother's activities every day," he says, "while the father leaves every morning for a mysterious job, making the 'man's role' seem more exciting to the child. Since Dottie spends more time at home where she studies, she does more around the home; however, I am as likely to cook and clean up as she . . . and Heather sees this. Dottie purposely worked on Saturdays for a while so I could be home alone with Heather." Reflecting on childraising, Cox says, "The biggest thing I begrudge is the time she takes away from Dottie's and my relationship. There is so much pressure on a married couple to have a child. We were never supposed to question it. I feel if we had known then what we know now, Dottie and I wouldn't have adopted Heather . . . There is so much responsibility. "But," he adds, "she's so beautiful—she's a person and we are 100 percent attached to her. And it's such a challenge raising a non-sexist child." _R H writer pnotogTCipne^ Kit van \^}eove |w° Duel I Court r-lourton, Texas 77006 527-0606 ilbstata/tesgner house of coleman 713/523-2521 Thousands of Good Used Books 2419 S. Shepherd Houston, Texas 77019 524-9825 Breakthrough has a new address P. O. Box 88072 Houston 77004 I walking £ the ^m! school Remember ' life '. that peculiar but invigorating process that we were doing in the 60s? That process which curious and adventurous souls in other lime and other places have pursued with such intriguing and diverse results? Listen to the different ways some pathfinders have responded to the question What is life? " ...hut a dream. G. Buddha. "...a blast. " A. tin stein. "...a real switcheroo. " M. Breckinridge. ...an uphill struggle. " R. Sisyphus. "...a sweet mystery. V. Herbert. "...a strutting player. " L. Rentzel. "...just one damned thing after another. B. Graham. "...a gas." C. Chessman. "...a party. H. luce. ...a bit trying at times. " P. Pilate, "...amen. J. Christ. Now there's a little corner of life m Houston where you may Jin d others who are not content merely to sunive the 70s. persons who believe that growth is possible even in a decade which gave us Diet Sprite and Jimmy Carter. This little corner of life is THE WALKING SCHOOL A school without walls, a class without a teacher, learning without fear, analysis without a couch. Esulen without chic. what THE WALKING SCHOOL is Doug Milburn and whoever joins him on his walks. The walks may he mind-walks talking, rolc-pluving. reading, discussing, propounding—word-dances to many kinds of word-music in the form of readings from strange and wonderful sources. The walks may be body walks creating, dancing, performing, running, eating, watching, listening, applauding, playing, working, and perhaps even plain-old-walk-walks. THE WALKING SCHOOL beyond gurus, beyond ideologies, beyond religions, philosophies and analytical games, the chameleon and the chrysalis meet in the field where blooms Blake s sunflower grown weary of time. THE WALKING SCHOOL is not for everyone. If you miss the Eugs. wish you knew how Glenn Gould does it. have considerable respect for AS. Neill. feel the Gay Political Caucus and the National Organization for Women are equally important, see a great future for yourself, realize that Marshall McLuhan is forgotten but not gone, wonder if steep may not have some functions other than that of rest, have some sneaking suspicion of the infinite creativity within us all. THE WALKING SCHOOL may he for you. Sometimes waiting is walking. Sometimes walking is waiting. When you walk, sometimes it is more fun to walk alone Sometimes it is more fun to walk together. THE WALKING SCHOOL provides an opportunity to walk for a while together, if you like. how Classes meet once a week for three hours and are limited to eight persons. Enrollment is for ten weeks. The cost is fifty dollars. Classes are formed continuously. Hi an appropriate group forms. The application form for THE WALKING SCHOOL is designed to help you discover whether THE WALKING SCHOOL is for you and to help me discover whether you are for THE WALKING SCHOOL. It is a test which is no lest, since mistakes on it—as everywhere else— are impossible. To receive the application send five dollars to THE WALKING SCHOOL 5116 Caroline Houston. TX 77004 If the application and my response to it do not provide you with one of the more rewarding and enriching experiences of your life, your five dollars will be refunded. Doug Milburn taught at Rice for ten yearsiwhere he elicited rather different responses from the students on the one hand and the administration of the other), was the moving force for three years behind a Sunday night cultural irruption on KPFT known as The Chiliastic Hideon. is co-author of The Intrepid Walker's Guide to Houston, is sole author oj numerous strange and obscure scholarly articles(a bizarre creative anomaly we don t need to go into here), and has a theory of education that lies behind THE WALKING SCHOOL. The theory has two parts. Part I teaching is planting seeds: anything more is fascism. Part 2: if learning is really happening, you can t tell who's teaching and who's learning. one step at a time....