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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 3. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4193

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 3, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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File Name femin_201109_518c.jpg
Transcript Focus on Sister Grace Marian Marlel Nun leaves convent walls behind by Beverly Hebert Sister Grace Marian Martel is one of the new breed of nuns who has left convent walls behind her to work and live in the world. Nuns who dare to shed their habits also risk shedding the aura of mystery and special calling such habits can help create, but without the help of any such trappings this Maryknoll Sister has become known as "Amazing Grace". She is currently a member of the pastoral team at St. Anne's parish, where she is in charge of the social service ministry. When she came to Houston in 1967, it was to do public relations work for her order based on a combination of fund raising efforts and mission education. She went to churches, schools and various community organizations explaining the missionary efforts of the church, particularly of the Maryknoll sisters. At that time her territory stretched from Louisiana to New Mexico, and she was on the road a lot. "My involvement with St. Anne's grew out of a need to put down roots," she says. As an expression of her growing commitment to the community, she ran for parish council, the governing body of the church, and after being elected, she headed the council's social action committee. She began to evaluate the needs of the people, taking into account a survey that had just been conducted by two seminarians, who concluded priority should be given to the poor and elderly. Today the social action committee provides temporary emergency relief services such as food, clothing, furniture and transportation. Individuals are sometimes referred to other helping agencies, or counselled about available services such as food stamps and Medicare. Last year her work had expanded enough to require the help of an associate. The arrival of Sister Alice Meenan allowed Sister Grace to devote herself almost entirely to working with elderly persons. This represented a change in work focus for her, since as a young nun, her love of children led her into teaching. A motherless child herself, she was reared by an aunt and was certainly influenced by the Sisters of St. Joseph. They were her teachers from the time she entered school until she graduated. "Growing up in a small town in New England, without radio or television, it was hard to learn about what was going on in the outside world," she remembers. Of course there weren't many career models for women. Like many Catholic girls who observed the two roles open to them, mother-housewife or nun, she decided the life of a nun pulled her more strongly. It offered excitement and room for growth. "I wanted to be a sister all of my life, and my family always objected. I remember one of my aunts saying 'no one in our family has ever been a sister and what makes you think you'd be a good one?' " Then another girl who had joined the Maryknolls told her about the order. "I had intended to join the Sisters of St. Joseph. I loved them dearly, but they were typical Vermonters. Their approach to life was different than what I sensed when I went to visit the Maryknolls. They loved life. There was a joyousness and freedom there—something I wanted to be a part of." Mother Mary Joseph, a graduate of Smith College, founded the order of Maryknoll sisters in 1920. "If there was ever a free person, it was Mother Mary Joseph. She had never been taught by nuns herself, so she brought a fresh approach to religious life. Her whole idea was that every girl was somebody special with a unique gift to offer that shouldn't be squelched." In the beginning, the work of the sisters was to assist the Maryknoll fathers, and they were called "secretaries". It was Mother Mary Joseph who decided the American woman had a role to play in the mission field. While lay women continued to be told their place was in the home, Maryknoll sisters traveled SISTER GRACE MARTEL around the globe, and Sister Grace was sent to Hawaii. "A missionary can't be a clinging vine sort of woman," says Sister Grace. "Our sisters took courses and learned to do whatever we thought was needed to make the world a better place." Some nuns studied medicine, others animal husbandry. "The prime virtue was adaptability—make the most of what ERA Alert! by Ellen Mendoza In Houston, the John Birch Society and the American Party are warming up for an all-out attack on ERA in the 1977 legislative session. If we wait until next year to mount a defensive counterattack, it will be a case of "too little, too late." Steps we can take now are: 1) Most members of coalition organizations are also active in other clubs (PTA, church groups, civic clubs, etc.). These groups are doing their fall and winter program planning in the next few months, and now is the time to schedule an ERA program, using a well-informed "moderate" image speaker. 2) Ascertain the position of the legislative candidates, and see that they are politely and correctly informed about ERA (in a positive, non-defensive manner). Let them know that the thousands of informed, registered voters in the coalition are interested in electing progressive candidates. 3) Monitor the medial If a program or article presents ERA favorably, write or call in your approval now. (I keep a supply of postcards on hand to facilitate a quick response.) An anti-ERA presentation should elicit an immediate protest and a request for equal time. For example, almost all the women's magazines are planning pro-ERA articles in their July 1976 issues. Phyllis Schlafly, the anti-ERA head of the Eagle Forum, has urged its 40,000 members to pressure these magazines into canceling or modifying their plans. Now is the time for you to write to one or more of the magazines listed below, enthusiastically approving their ERA support. (Names and addresses courtesy of Phyllis!) WOMEN'S DA Y, 1515 Broadway, N. Y., N. Y. 10019 FAMIL Y CIRCLE, 488 Madison Ave., N. Y.t N. Y. 10019 GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, 959 8th Ave., N. Y, N. Y. 10019 LADIES' HOME JOURNAL, 641 Lexington, N. Y., N. Y. 10022 COSMOPOLITAN, 959 8th Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10019 McCALL 'S, 230 Park Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10017 REDBOOK, 230 Park Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10017 MADAMOISELLE, 420 Lexington, N. Y., N. Y. 10017 GLAMOUR, 350 Madison Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10017 COED, Scholastic Magazine, 50 W. 44th St., N. Y., N. Y. 10036 SEVENTEEN, 850 3rd St., N. Y., N. Y. 10022 The above suggestions can be followed by anyone who is a believer in the basic guarantee of individual equality. They require neither expertise nor conspicuous, extended effort, just interest and a little time. If we don't wish to play a futile game of "catch-up" next year, NOW IS THE TIME TO ACT? © MONTROSE V. W. SERVICE COMPLETE REPAIRS & SERVICE REBUILT & USED ENGINES & PARTS © 1118 MONTROSE 526-7624 you find and don't complain." Sister Grace got her masters degree in Hawaiian history at the University of Hawaii, and for twenty-eight years taught children from non-English speaking homes—native Hawaiians, Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Koreans, and Portuguese. "I thought of myself as a bridge builder. It was an ideal opportunity to help people appreciate each other and their different cultural backgrounds." She was in Honolulu when Pearl Harbor was bombed, and she was there many years later when the islands were finally granted statehood. Hawaii had become part of her life, but she left it by her own request. "I was 57-years- old and had always felt older teachers should know when to quit. I thought it was time to let people more in tune with youth take over . . . people they can identify with more readily," she relates. "Even though you've lived all your life in one place, that doesn't preclude finding happiness in an entirely new place; built into human beings is an adaptability which is a recipe for happiness." She adds, smiling, "I'm a now person. I think that's a great grace—not to be yearning for the past." As a "now" person, she is again serving as a role model, showing older women and men they can continue to live full lives. She has established a Young at Hearts Club that provides a variety of activities to "help these people broaden their horizons and not draw back into a safe but fearful existence. It gets them out, helps them meet other people, to think, to explore new areas of life." Perhaps most important of all are the friendships that have grown in the group, the spirit of camaraderie and concern for each other, and the support they find in facing together common problems. People who were old and alone now have the security of knowing 'somebody cares about me . Sister Grace Martel is a Christian minister. As she visits the lonejy and brings communion to the sick, she is a living presence of the gospel message. She doesn't believe she will live to see the ordination of women, but whenever it does come, she will have been one of the bridge builders. MARCIA GILLESPIE, editor of Essense magazine and Dr. HOR- TENSE DIXON, special executive assistant to Mayor Fred Hofheinz, who presented a city proclamation declaring May 11 "Marcia Gillespie Day" in the City of Houston. Gillespie addressed members of the Black Media Coalition during her Houston visit. Pit cooked meats Home-style vegetables BIG TIMBER BARB Q tt—nm Brittmore and Old Katy Road Owners-operators, Gay Cosgriff, Jim Ward