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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 2. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976 - Page 2, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 6, June 1976 - July 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 2
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File Name femin_201109_518b.jpg
Transcript Editorials Can strong survive? Does our society allow strong, assertive, uncompromising women—women motivated by conscience and commitment—to survive in politics? If you have ever wondered about it, ask yourself whatever happened to Sissy Farenthold, Hattie Mae White, or Gertrude Barnstone. "My father once told me you could never depend on politics," Sissy Farenthold recalled sadly. "So I felt it was better to move and work than to languish in Texas." Frances "Sissy" Farenthold, the woman who was twice moved by conscience to challenge Dolph Briscoe for governor of this state, was advised not to run for the 22nd Congressional District seat because she could not depend on liberal support. Thus, she was forced to leave Texas and accept the presidency of a women's college in New York. Hattie Mae White, the only Black woman ever to serve on the HISD Board, endured racial slurs and threats of violence during the 60's, while she vocally supported the rights of poor children to get free milk in school lunch programs. After one term on the board and an unsuccessful bid for the state legislature, she "retired" to a quiet life as a school counselor in a district for which she once formulated policy. And, Gertrude Barnstone, who together with White fought on the school board for the desegregation of public schools and who was the subject of a Look Magazine article entitled "A Lady Stirs Her City's Conscience" -where has she been the past six years? Barnstone has taken one survival job after another to support her family. At one point in the 70's when broadcast stations were forced to integrate women and minorities in all levels of the station, a token "management" position was created, that of community relations director. KPRC-TV hired Barnstone for that position until she ran (and lost) a state senate race. She was fired soon after that. Gertrude Barnstone is a special case to feminists because she was there from the beginning, working for us while we were working up enough courage and energy to join her. The Harris County Women's Political Caucus, the group that created the office of the Women's Advocate, endorsed her for that position (this year), as did other feminist groups. Broad-based community support came from Olga Soliz and LULAC, June Holly of the Houston Metropolitan Ministries and Judge Andrew Jefferson, the Mayor's own co-campaign manager. Yet, Fred Hofheinz chose not to appoint Barnstone. He felt she would be a liability to his administration because of her "past political involvement." Hofheinz told a Houston journalist that it would have been "counter-productive" to appoint Barnstone because she was "too political" and thus would have been "in- effectiW. Are these the views of a liberal mayor or of a "political" njiayor, succumbing to conservative pressure and compromjise? Can we believe the "promises" that the Mayor will be responsive to the feminist community of Houston and yet accept the fact that Gertrude Barnstone is persona non grata in ajliberal administration? What lessons are there for women of conscience who decide to fight "marshmallows" like Briscoe, racist and sexist schjool districts—or city administrations? To be silent? Passive? Supportive to the white male in powerf I And, if we break the rules—do we risk being labeled as liabilities and abandoned? Women will never go back, give up, or lose the urgency of commitment. We expect the same responsibility and conscience, and the strength to act on that conscience, from thfe self-avowed enlightened—elected .and unelected— in our c ty and state. Sf/Ai^A- (c) Houston Breakthrough 1976 letters to the editor Thank you for giving space to my interview with Ms. Wendy Haskell Meyer, who was nice enough to visit with me and discuss her article (Breast Lump? See An Oncologist, in Breakthrough, April 1976) on Ms. Kushner's book on breast cancer (Breast Cancer: A Personal History and An Investigative Report). Unfortunately, someone 'edited out' what I thought to be very significant things I said to Ms. Meyer, and I would appreciate calling this to the attention of your readers. ... I would like to state. . . that Ms. Kushner's suggestion on 'doctor shopping' when a lady has a breast lump is counter-productive. I feel very strongly that in all interpersonal relations there is still a place for mutual trust and honesty. I reject the idea that a woman cannot trust the obstetrician who delivered her baby; and the gynecologist who sees her each year or the family doctor who has seen her and her family through serious crisis. I reject the fact that these people suddenly are not sufficiently trustworthy to find the right doctor to care for her breast lump. MALCOLM FOOTE SHER, MD President, Greater Houston Unit American Cancer Society Editor's Note: The edited portion of the article reads as follows. "Sher agrees that a G.P. shouldn't be treating breast cancer and doubts that any would want to. He advises a woman with a lump to 'go to a doctor you know and trust—not necessarily the one recommended by your hairdresser,' who Sher claims is a prominent source of doctor referrals. 'Ask that doctor to tell you who is most knowledgeable', Sher said." I feel certain Breakthrough will fill an important void, not only as a focal point for Texas feminists, but as an educational tool for public officials. CHETBROOKS State Senator On a recent business trip to Dallas, I encountered an extremely rude Southwest Airlines employee ... I wrote the airline expressing my unwillingness to fly with them in the future in light of this incident, coupled with the offensiveness of their advertising and their hot-pants clad "stewardesses". Here was my reply from S. A.'s President, M. Lamar Muse: "I am very sorry that you find Southwest Airlines' advertising, service and employees offensive. It is comforting to know that you have sufficient wherewithal to pay almost three times as much for less convenient service on competitive airlines." To which I replied, "You may be assured that I shared your sarcastic non-reply with as many persons as possible. It is comforting to know that you can afford to lose customers." (The letter was co-signed by 27 men and women.) I would urge all customers to boycott Southwest Airlines and to express to Mr. Muse their unwillingness to sacrifice personal values and concern for quality of service in exchange for lowered costs. ROSEMARY McCASLIN Editor's note: You may write M. Lamar Muse at 1820 Regal Row, Dallas 75235 or call, (214)630-5511. STAFF Art- Pandy Crow, Rhonda Griffin-Boone, Charley Kubricht-Fore, Mark Stinson Advertising — Nancy Landau, Mary-k Wilson Business — Jack Keller Circulation — Nancy Kern, Mary-k Wilson Copy - Gay Cosgriff, Rogers Med lock Editors-Writers — Gertrude Barnstone, Janice Blue, Gay Cosgriff, Senora Hudson, Barbara Hugetz Feature Writers — Jan Cunningham, Wendy Haskell Meyer, Adelaide Moorman, Patti O'Kane Photography — Amos Barrow, Marilyn Jones, Nancy Landau EDITORIAL BOARD Gertrude Barnstone, Janice Blue, Gay Cosgriff Vol. 1, No. 6, June-July 1976. Houston Breakthough is published monthly (with the exception of the June-July and the August-September issues) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company 1915-B Wentworth, Houston, Texas 77004, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, Texas 77004. Telephone (713) 526- 6686. Subscriptions $5.00 a year. Newsstand 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive, in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60201.