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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 17. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4091

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 17, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_528q.jpg
Transcript Alice Stallnecht murals on exhibit By Florence Dwek Spring has arrived in Houston, and with it, two not entirely unrelated firsts for women: the Rev. Helen M. Havens was ordained as the first female Episcopal priest in the city's history; and the religious murals of Alice Stallknecht will be displayed at the Museum of Fine Arts (beginning May 5) in the first major showing of its kind outside the artist's hometown of Chatham, Cape Cod. The very existence of a female priest lends a new credence in and respect for a woman's capacity to lead and guide her community. Her newly-gained status effectively undercuts the cliquish arrogance of an all-male clergy. Stallknecht's true-to-life depiction of Christ, as the recognizable portrait of a man from her own village, restores a touch of humanism lacking in traditionally idealized religious painting. Separated by time and space (Stallknecht died in 1973), each of these women is thus concerned with furthering the universality and accessibility of religious communication. Stallknecht spent her life in the small New England village of Chatham, and it is the Chatham villagers that she so faithfully incorporates into her religious allegories. Although Stallknecht had studied art early in life, her productive painting years did not come about until her early fifties. Family responsibilities and the hardships imposed by the mental breakdown of her husband completely destroyed any earlier creative opportunities for her. Stallknecht created two murals, done in oil on canvas, specifically for her local Congregational church. The first of these, Christ Preaching to the Multitude, is a DETAIL FROM A STALLKNECHT MURAL triptych done in 1931. Christ is shown in the central panel standing in a rowboat with outstretched hands, flanked by the men, women and children of Chatham in the side panels. Each face is meant to be a true portrait of an actual Chatham resident. The second mural, The Circle Supper (1935-1943), consists of 18 separate panels of figure groups at a traditional Wednesday night church supper. The presence of Christ is again the central motif, showing him in the act of blessing the bread for communion, surrounded by the members of the congregation. In both murals, the artist couples the commonplace with the mystical, and the present with the past, to reflect the complete permeation of religious faith in Chatham society. In 1945 Stallknecht carried out another mural, more secular in nature, entitled Everyman to His Trade. Of considerable size, it consists of 30 separate panels that depict the working people of Chatham at their respective trades, all posed against the consistent backdrop of the sea. The proud and honest faces of these working men and women are treated with an almost Whitmanesque reverence. The 150 figures to be found in all three murals display a straightforward, rigid intensity of character that embodies the essence of puritan ethics. Although each figure is meant to be seen as an individual, all are tied together by the unifying forces of church and community. As Lloyd Goodrich, Director of the Whitney Museum of Art, explains in the catalogue exhibition, "With all its uncompromising realism, her art is fundamentally religious, filled with the conviction of faith as a unifying force, an essential element in daily life, a unifying spirit." Whatever our personal religious beliefs, we may still share with Alice Stallknecht the strong faith she has so eloquently expressed in the cooperative efforts of hardworking men and women in communities like our own. A New England Town: A Portrait By Alice Stallknecht (1880- 1973) will be on display at the Museum of Fine Art's Upper Brown Gallery May 5-June 5. From there the exhibition will go on to Cape Cod and Washington, D.C. The accompanying catalogue is available in the museum bookstore. In the River Oaks Shopping Center 1968 West Gray Houston, Texas 77019 526-2273 Manager Tootie Nelson and Roger Chabulla * *>? ^. speed. quality, results N Manager Ruby Sanders In the Bermac Building 4101 San Jacinto Houston, Texas 77004 526-6364 PAGE 16 • MAY 1977 • HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH