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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Page 15
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 15. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4089.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4089

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 15, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4089.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_528o.jpg
Transcript Hazel Bracken: Time and an open mind Hazel Bracken was elected to the Houston School Board in 1973 and immediately startled many people by stating that if an equally qualified man and woman applied for the same job, she would vote for the man, since ['women should be subservient to men/' Feeling ran strong; there was a call for her resignation. Time — and an open mind — change many things. Recently, Hazel Bracken was strong and articulate in her support jof Betty Minzenmayer, the superintendent's candidate for principal of Scarborough Jr. - Sr. High School. There was only one woman serving as principal of a senior high school in HISD and there was great resistance to Minzenmayer — solely because she is a woman. What has caused this change in attitude on Bracken's part? Gertrude Barnstone, herself a member of the HISD Board from 1964 - 69, explores this question and others with Hazel Bracken. HB: What changed my attitude? Serving on the Board with those strong, strong men! It was an atti- tudinal thing, a putdown. They are very courteous people but there were many times when I had to fight to be heard — and then I had to say, "But I'm not through!" By Gertrude Barnstone Then there was the matter of being passed over for the presidency when she was in line for it. HB: First I was assistant secretary, then secretary, then vice president. I let it be known in writing that I wanted to be president, but I sensed something was amiss when there were no consultations or indications that I would become president. I felt every bit as qualified as the president and when I was not chosen, I was miffed. It's very definitely an "old boys" club! I've learned from that last experience that if you sit around and wait for the men to ask you, you'll wait until the earth looks level. So I jumped out ahead of the men and have already announced that I am running for reelection. They are on their own! GB: You and Barbara Jordan are the only women in elected office from this city. What would you tell a woman who was thinking of running for political office? HB: Just go like mad! It's the most fun thing I ever did. And I've learned so much! I never would have taken sex discrimination seriously — it took this experience. GB: How can young women get the spirit of "I can do anything" which you seem to have? HB: I don't know. I was so downtrodden when I was growing up. I didn't think I could do anything. I was 25 years old and had never made a decision of any significance. I'd bring a dress home and Mother would say, "I don't like it." Daddy would say, "You can't do this or that." I had no identity. I'd graduated from college, been voted most popular, beauty, best dressed and none of it meant anything to me. I just didn't know who I was. At the age of 25,1 decided to get away from my parents. If I didn't make it, so I didn't make it. That's when I came to Houston. Years ago I identified with the feelings of a famous journalist who committed suicide and left a note saying he was tired of trying to fill up the 24 hours. I had been so satisfied with meaningless female activities — garden club on Tuesday —* what's your new recipe? Beauty parlor on Thursday. Life has to be more than this! I was very depressed. Now I realize the depression was looking for something significant in the scheme of things and not finding it. I do have what I feel is a very real relationship with the Lord a/id I believe what he says to be. He says, "I've come that ye might "The Houston School Board is definitely an 'old boys' club." There were things I wanted to De very vocal about and if there vere matters I wanted to emo- ionally ventilate about, I felt I had 3very right to! I sensed a feeling of tolerance: 'We love you as a friend, we idmire you as a woman, but you eally don't count too much. Ne're us and you're you and we lad to have you for our token voman. You're a good sport and if A/e had to have a woman, we're zlad it's you!" Betty Minzenmayer had come hrough two screenings and was io far ahead of the nearest runner- jp, who was a black man. I wanted ro say "Would you like to have the second runner-up?" because they <vould have screamed as loudly about having a black male principal. That's just the kind of peo- >le they are. They had a white nale principal picked out, by the vay! My horizons have been pushed back 29 miles on either side relative to many things. GB: Are you interested in getting into any other political office? HB: I've investigated getting into state politics. Basically, I'm a Republican. I am fascinated with government and fascinated to find that I actually am as capable — if not more so — as most of the people I've met. When you're growing up, you think that everything is going to be all right because they're going to take care of it. Then when you go up to Austin and Washington to the legislature, Congress and Senate and see who all those people are, they're not any brighter than you are! So, I'm real interested in just exploring state office, but until 1980, when Nancy Palm feels the Democrats will probably redis- trict, there's nothing for me. have life." So I began to explore what he meant by life and I found it meant really living, not just existing. A dear friend told me that one should try two new things every year — that way your horizons will broaden. This year I'd like to become bilingual and I'm interested in television. I want a show like Nancy Ames'. I would love that! jt may not come to pass, but usually if I get an idea and can't get rid of it, I walk up to it like a seeing-eye door and if it opens, fine. If not, no sweat! My real emergence came about with my divorce in 1970. I had to get out of the cocoon; I had to find that I could do it. Now I'm very anticipatory. I'm on tiptoes about life. I just wish every woman would find the courage to begin to explore possibilities, regardless of what she relies on for sufficiency — herself, or as in my case, on God. HAZEL BRACKEN NON-SEXIST TOYS THAT CARE Rosalind ianklinJ mi ANNr SAYKK M**c*XJLkV ***i W**t•?*>* ROSALIND FRANKLIN & DNA adults, $8.95. Anne Sayre's "vivid view of what it is like to be a gifted woman in an especially male profession." Hardcover, 221 pp. THE COMPLEAT COMPUTER adults, $7.95. Fun for the layperson and computer specialist. A "whole earth" catalogue format about computers, with poetry, cartoons, and science fiction art. Paperbound 216 pp. V*MTM1SCL IHE COMPLEAT amrt<aot\t MAMV0THM lUU*wm»MJ COMPUTER a»« m m %*l*h a special saetia* •*: >^ "» *g fte ^* FREE WITH PURCHASE: non-sexist TOYS THAT CARE combined Ed. Guide & CATALOGUE, SHIPPING 1 - 2 items ADD $1.00. Each addt'l item add $ .30. (N.Y.S. add sales tax). CHECK TO: P.O. BOX 81, DEPT. HB, BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY 10510. New opportunities await yon in real estate investment! e Land O Duplexes Residences O Commercial Call today! BARBARA LANE-FARLEY your feminist realtor® 461 3212 4*1**075 Red Caboose Realty 1**1 Gessner May 19 NEED HELP IN YOUR BUSINESS? ATTEND PRE-BUSINESS WORKSHOP Sponsored by Service Corps Of Retired Executives and Small Business Administration at University of Houston For free counseling, call 228-4945 June 1 PACE 14 • MAY 1977 • HOUSTON IRIAKTHR6UCH