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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Page 13
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 13. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4087.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4087

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 13, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4087.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_528m.jpg
Transcript Is rape a justification for murder? Can an alleged rape victim get a fair trial in a judicial system dominated by men? Can minorities get a fair shake from the criminal justice system of the United States? What is the legal definition of 'self defense"? These are vital questions posed by the explosive rape and murder trial of Inez Garcia, which will be presented as a 90- rninute courtroom drama on Channel 8, Wednesday, May 25, at 9 p.m. and Saturday, May 28 at 9 p.m. The program, titled The People vs. Inez Garcia, was produced by San Francisco's public TV station, KQED. The Pride of Inez By Maria Del Drago Inez Garcia has become a public figure, yet to most people, she remains an enigma. Beautiful and flamboyantly dressed, with a toughness born of the barrio, she still behaved like an innocent; a child-woman who at first could explain her rape only in the sanctity of the confessional. An illiterate, unable even to tell time when her trial began, she nonetheless tried to control and Reprinted by around them, and they are treated by it with the same misunderstanding and prejudice. My vision blurs as I force myself to remember what it is like to grow up Latina in an Anglo world. We look different, yes. But there is a greater difference than our brown nipples, the shapes of our faces, and our Indian eyes From the moment of our birth, we are thrust into an extraordinary patchwork quilt of contradictions. We combine witchcraft comfortably with blind obedience to permission ®Ms. Magazine, 1975 When I was born, my grandmother expressed her disapproval by going into deep mourning for a month: as a first-born child, I should have been a macho. Then she arranged to have masses celebrated each week to ensure the future birth of a male heir. To make doubly sure, she also called in the local bruja to bless my mother and remove the evil spirit that had given her a female child. Our position within the family circle is learned early. At the table, the men and boys are served first, "I believe that no man or no person has the right to take over a woman's body because they feel like it. I believe if a woman wants to be with a man, shell be with that man." — Inez Garcia affect the politics of her trial and the kaleidoscopic realities around it. A minority woman with an instinctive fear of authority, especially of police and the courts, she ended up defying both — not only on her own behalf, but, quite consciously, on behalf of all women. This contradiction, this enigma of passivity and defiance, may survive the possible appeal of her case. It may remain the public's view of her — unless she is understood as a Latina. I know, for I am one, too. There is pain and anger between these lines — as I try to explain Inez for what she is, I am also trying to explain myself. We are not exactly the same: I grew up in Brazil and now live in California, where Chicanos are the main Spanish speaking group; Inez was born to Cuban and Puerto Rican parents in New York, married to a Cuban, and has also spent her recent years among Chicanos in California. But the varieties of Latin culture share far more basic values with each other than they do with the Anglo world Brecht Drama at Main Street Theater THE MOTHER By Kathy Clifford As a Marxist, Bertolt Brecht recognized women as a vital part of any revolution, As a playwright, he wrote several plays emphasizing women and women's roles, one of which — The Mother — is on stage at Main Street Theater May 5-7 and May 12-14. Written in 1930, based on Gorki's novel of the same name, The Mother is about one woman, Pel- agea Vlassova, and the Russian revolution. As the play opens, Vlassova sees herself simply as "the mother of a worker and the widow of a worker." She complains bitterly about poor living conditions and her son's low wages, but feels that she is powerless to effect change. She is drawn into the revolution, reluctantly at first, and finds herself rapidly politicized. Gorki killed his heroine, but Brecht preferred to have Pelagea Vlassova survive, to transcend physical abuse and the loss of her son, to carry the workers' flag. This play is a prime example of Brechtian epic theatre, the so- called "theatre of alienation." Titles and captions, slides and minimal sets keep one intensely aware that this is a play and not reality. Brecht did not want his audience to sit back and get caught up in a plot, only to forget the play as soon as they left the theatre; he wanted them to listen and re member a message. And although it is sometimes disquieting, this is precisely what happens. The ambience of the Main Street production is not necessarily Marxist, but definitely revolutionary, an allegory of the struggle of the politically oppressed everywhere. Actors, technicians, designers and musicians at Main Street have actively collaborated in artistic decisions, addressing both the complexity of the play and the challenge of a provocative theatrical experience. Directed by John Houchin; original score by Michael Skupin; Main Street Theater at Autry House, 6265 South Main, 524- 3168; $2.50 general, $1.50 student. the Catholic church, going to mass each Sunday, yet calling a bruja (witch) to our house to remove the "bad eye" an enemy has put on us. We are bilingual in a world where most children imperfectly master one language only, yet Anglo cultural standards may judge us illiterate or backward. Our own cultural behavior, casting our eyes down when talking to authorities as a sign of respect, for instance, may cause us to be judged shifty, dishonest. If we are women, we are taught to be gentle, quiet, and shy, yet men do great violence in defense of our "honor" — our virginity as girls, our fidelity as wives - and we ourselves are taught to resist such "dishonor" to the death. get the best cuts of meat (or the only meat), the freshest fruits, the strongest coffee. Sacrifices are made for a boy's education, but rarely for a girl's. We wear a small silver medal of the Blessed Virgin and often make do with hand-me- down dresses, but a true macho has at least one suit of spotless white and wears a bright religious medal on a gold chain. Girls become more and more subject to church dictates as puberty approaches;, the very time when a macho's growing male prowess begins to replace his dependence on religious authority. Latinas are taught to observe all the sacraments, beginning with confession. In the poorly lit bowels of our parish church, we kneel uncom- New Dimensions in Health Care The Total Approach June 11 - 12 Rice Rittenhouse Hotel Houston, Texas The enormous power of the mind to affect physiological functioning has only begun to be explored. David Bressler, Ph.D. Center for Integral Medicine Presenters will include: Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D.: "Death and Dying" Hans Selye, M.D.: "Stress Without Distress" Stephanie Matthews-Simonton and O. Carl Simonton, M.D.: "Cancer and Visualization" Marguerite Abell Nakles, R.N.: "Techniques of Humanistic Nursing Care" Karl Pribram, M.D.: "We Are What We Do" and many more leading authorities. Come participate and meet them. For more information, call 713-795-4263 or write to P.O. Box 61426, Houston 77028. HOUSTON HOLISTIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION PACE 12 • MAY 1977 • HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH