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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 10. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4084.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4084

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 10, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4084.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
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File Name femin_201109_528j.jpg
Transcript "I have been pleasantly surprised that we've gotten as many dedicated and professional women as we have/ says Jack Harris, KPRC-TV general manager. Below are excerpts from the transcript of the first negotiating meeting held December, 1973, between the Houston Area NOW Media Reform Task Force and Harris. The station hired Carole Kneeland as their only female hard news reporter shortly after the second such meeting in January, 1974. Another woman reporter, Kathryn Culvert, was hired soon after and in April, Sara Lowrey became daily co-anchor and weekend anchor person. In June, 1974, KPRC-TV signed an agreement with NOW to increase coverage of women's news and to hire women and minorities in proportion to their representation in the local population. Harris denies acceding to NOWs demands in the hiring of women: "I don't think there was ever any block on their going in. I just think it was a natural evolution/' he says today. NOW: Your employment of women is inadequate in that you don't have enough women employed, particularly in management, professional and technical positions. In fact, it has decreased two percent in the past year. Harris: We don't keep up with that. Frankly, we don't go on quotas for women or minorities. We're not required to go on quotas, dear. NOW: I know you're not required. Harris: And we don't. NOW: But you are required to give equal opportunity and you're supposed to have some sort of affirmative action plan, aren't you? Harris: No! NOW: The FCC requires you to actively recruit both women and minorities. Harm: The FCC hasn't really addressed itself to women ... we certainly have not in any way discriminated against women in employment. We're for equal opportunity, dear, but we're not going on quotas if that's what you're talking about... What kind of program would you have us have for women? NOW: As an example, you had an opening in the on-the-air spot after Steve Smith left for Pittsburgh, and you hired Ron Stone in his place. Did you interview any women? * Harris: We didn't interview anybody for it, dear. Let me explain something to you about television. I had to go through this with the blacks. When you're talking about an on-the-air person, you're talking about an anchor person. We don't care what sex they are or what color they are. The public decides the person. I've got 37 or 38 people in the news department. Some of them are women. Some are black. Some are Chicano. Now we didn't select any of those to be the anchor person because we didn't think they were ready for it, which made several of our people unhappy. We have just finished a $24,000 study of all our people and all the people in town. Those books over there are studies by research organizations that have to do with personality and what the people think of on-the-air people. We are not able to force the public into who or what they're going to watch. They've got that channel to switch. NOW: But they have to have a choice to reject women at least. Harris: Dear, let me tell you, your voice would never go on-the-air. NOW: I'm not applying for on-the-air. Harris: I know, but you have a feminine voice. The public — I've been in this business for so many years, I know some of these things. I put the first woman on radio — A Woman Looks at the News — at WMS in Nashville. She did a fine job. This was a special show aimed at a woman audience, you see. We're not discriminating against women. We're gonna make our own choices, and I told this to the blacks and I'm going to tell it to you. NOW: We're not saying that we want to make the choices for you. But you have gotten into an issue right there. Do you automatically assume that women's voices ... Harris: Yes, yes, I assume from thirty something years of experience. NOW: You say the public chooses. If the public never had a chance ... Harris: They have had a chance. NOW: But the point still is that if women are not given an opportunity to become anchor persons, to become visible, the audiences can't even have the chance to reject them. In Europe it has been very common for years and years to have anchorwomen. Harris: Well, the audience in Europe and the audiences in this country ...We get the polls. We get surveys all the time. This is not making an arbitrary decision on the thing. We've been through this any number of times. There are over a thousand television stations in this country, and not a one of them uses a woman as an anchor. I understand 11 is thinking about one. That's their prerogative if they want to. We are not going to decide who is going to be an anchor on their color or their sex. NOW: But you are, by saying that it cannot be a woman. Harris: I didn't say there couldn't be one. I've never seen one, and we didn't audition to select it, you see. NOW: But you said just a minute ago that a woman's voice automatically just excludes her. Harris: That is my opinion. That is my opinion. NOW: Well, then, doesn't your opinion matter in who is hired? Harris: Yes, and it is controlling. NOW: All right, then, you are automatically excluding women on the grounds of sex. Harris: I said that is my opinion now. I didn't sav never. NOW: But what we are saying is that you may not be interpreting correctly and there is this automatic assumption that women's voices are objectionable. What do you base it on? You say you have some polls. Do you have some specific polls that show this? Harris: We haven't made a study on that particular thing, dear, but don't try to put your judgment on television in this as against mine. I have been in this business for very many years. I have had very many occasions to judge on these things. NOW: At least interview women. Harris: We didn't interview anybody, dear. We go for somebody who is experienced. NOW: Then you will always be perpetuating men because women will never have the opportunity unless you take somebody from your reporters. Harris: In my opinion, none of them that I know are ready for it. I have never seen a woman come in here that I think would be a good anchor per son. Now when I say a good one, I mean the best we can get. GOT- WE0ECD NIKKI! Hosting THE WOMEN'S ADVOCATE' Every Friday 3-4 p.m. Exclusively yours on NIKKI VAN HIGHTOWER Affirmative Action Division City of Houston KTRH •740 Whenever we're out of the office, the Breakthrough phones are answered courteously and your messages are taken efficiently 24 hours a day by CCMJSMJ&t, IMC of Houston a woman-owned business live answering service radio paging Northwest Office 12345 Kingsride 467-2111 Central Office 4215 Graustark 524-3985 Nonheast Office 4215 Graustark 691-2088 Southwest Office 3221 Fondren 781-3413 Roberta K. Tillinghast, President Houston • Galveston • San Antonio • Corpus Christi HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH • MAY.1977 • PAGE 9