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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 9. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4083.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4083

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 9, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4083.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Item Description
Title Page 9
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File Name femin_201109_528i.jpg
Transcript Still a man's world Statistically speaking By Carole Kneeland Women today are more visible on the air, but almost all of the management or decision-making positions in Houston broadcasting are held by males. Statistically speaking, women have hardly liberated the airwaves, as we see in this report on the five-year progress of women in Houston broadcasting by Carole Kneeland, former KPRC-TV reporter, now a feature writer for the Corpus Christi Caller Times. The broadcast business in Houston is still largely a man's world, but women are slowly making inroads. Due to strong pressure from the National NOW Media Reform Task Force, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued a ruling in December 1971, adding women to the list of groups that stations must actively recruit for employment. From that time, stations were required to file annual reports showing male/female employment in five major categories: Officials and Managers, Professionals (on-air and production), Technical, Sales, and Clerical. A look at the most recent Equal Employment Opportunity Commission statistics filed in 1976 by 17 radio stations and five television stations shows that women hold 30 percent of the jobs in Houston's broadcast media. That's eight percent more than they held five years ago, the first time the FCC required the radio and television stations to file EEOC reports and make them public. Women have gained the most over the past five years in sales departments, where the number of women employees jumped from nine percent in 1972 to 35 percent in 1976. That's encouraging if women are ever going to move into the managerial ranks, because many of the male station managers and program directors got their start selling commercials. Right now women hold very few of the high-paying managerial jobs. The statistics show 23 percent of the officials and managers at the radio and television stations in 1976 were women. That was up 14 percent from five years ago. But instead of showing a significant increase in the number of women in high-paying, powerful jobs, it apparently shows an increase in the male managers' understanding of how the statistical system works and how to pad it. Whereas in the 1972 reports, head secretaries were listed under the "clerical" category, in the 1976 reports, they often were called "office managers" and listed under "officials and managers." In fact, of the 44 women in the "officials and managers" category in 1976, at least 37 were office managers, traffic directors, bookkeepers, community relations directors, public service directors or promotions directors. Those are jobs that are lower in pay and status than most of the jobs the men in that category held. Most of the men were station managers, program directors, sales managers and news directors. Women gained 11 percent in the professional job category, moving from 10 percent to 21 percent over the last five years. That is the category that includes the on-the-air jobs, but there is no breakdown on how many of those women were on the air and how many were not. Five years ago, there was only one woman in a technical job. That represented less than one percent of the technical jobs available then. In 1976, there were 13 female technicians, all of them at television stations. That represented six percent of the available technical jobs. Women also had a bigger hold on the low-paying clerical and janitorial jobs in 1976 than they did five years ago. Ninety percent of those jobs were held by women in 1976, compared to 86 percent five years ago. That meant about half of the women employed by Houston's broadcast media were in clerical jobs. Women represented 100 percent of the clerical staff at 14 out of 23 stations. Radio stations boasted a better overall record than television stations, although some of the radio stations with the highest audience ratings had the worst female hiring records. Employment of women at radio stations increased from 21 percent in 1972 to 32 percent in 1976. Meanwhile, at the television stations, the number of female employees went up from 22 percent to 26 percent over those five years. KLYX* radio made the biggest jump of any station, 40 percent, bringing the number of females to 46 percent of the staff. Other radio stations making substantial gains were KNUZ/KQUE, up 20 percent, and KYOK, KRLY and KRBE, all up 18 percent. KLYX had the most women of any radio percent at 46 percent. KCOH was close behind at 44 percent, followed by KYOK and KNUZ/KQUE at 40 percent, KLEF at 38 percent, KXYZ/KAUM at 37 percent, and KEYH and KRLY at 35 percent. KLYX, KCOH, KODA, KRLY and KNUZ/KQUE offered the greatest opportunity to women in radio as of 1976, with anywhere from 64 percent (at KNUZ/KQUE) to 85 percent (at KLYX) working in managerial, professional and sales jobs. KPFT had no women on its paid staff and so won the distinction of being the worst employer of women at any radio station in Houston. However, it should be remembered that KPFT is a Pacifica station with a mostly volunteer staff whose composition is not reflected in EEOC statistics. KFMK was next at 17 percent; then KPRC-TV at 22 percent; KODA at 23 percent; KLVL at 25 percent; and KILT and KULF/ KYND at 26 percent. The only radio station registering a decline in its percentage employment of women over the five-year period was KLVL, which dropped four percent. KFMK and KULF/KYND registered the lowest gain at three percent, followed by KILT at four percent and KPRC at seven percent. As for the television stations, Channel 13 (KTRK) and Channel 8 (KUHT) registered the greatest change, increasing 11 percent each since 1972, so that each of them employed 33 percent women in 1976, the highest of any Houston television station. However, Channel 13 had 63 percent of its female employees in clerical jobs. Channel 8, on the other hand, has given 84 percent of its female employees jobs as managers, professionals or technicians. Channel 2 (KPRC) had the worst record of any television station, with 22 percent of its 1976 employees being women. Channel 2 also showed the smallest gain over the five-year period — up only two percent. *KLYX changed format during 1977, from all-news to rock. Most of the women and men it had employed lost their jobs in the change-over. Note: most stations cooperated in the survey and forwarded 1972 — 1976 EEOC records. KIKK and KENR would not forward the forms. KDOG said they had no reports on file for 1976. ORAPH OF OVERALL EMPLOYMENT OP WOMEN BY RADIO AND TV STATIONS I 42% 140% 38% 36% 34% 1 32% 30% 1 28% 1 26% [24% 1 22% S- „*•»«••*** >" —--^ 1 20% 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 Radio TV r Officials and Professionals Technicians Salesworkers Clerical and Total Percent Percent Change I Manaosrs janitorial Women, 1976 Since 1972 Male Female Mile Ferrule Mali Female Male Female Male Female I KCOH 1 (1430 AM) 6 1 3 2 0 0 1 3 0 2 44% +14% 1 KENR 1 (1080 AM) figures unavailable since 1974 1 KEYH not on air 1 (850 AM) 6 3 13 3 3 0 2 3 0 4 35% In 1972 1 KFMK 1 (97.9 FM) 2 0 5 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 17% +3% 1 KIKK, KIKK-FM fig Lire* unavailable since 1975 1 (650 AM, 95.7 FM) 1 KILT, KILT-FM 1 (610 AM, 100.3 FM) 5 2 23 3 5 0 8 2 2 8 26% +4% 1 KLEF 1 (94.5 FM) 2 0 4 1 0 0 2 1 0 3 38% +9% 1 KLVL 1 (1480 AM) 0 0 12 0 0 0 2 0 1 5 25% -4% 1 KLYX 1 (102.1 FM) 3 3 10 5 0 0 2 3 0 2 46% +40% 1 KNUZ,KQUE-FM 1 (1230 AM, 102.9 FM) 8 4 10 2 1 0 2 3 0 5 40% +20% I KODA I (1010 AM, 99.1 FM) 3 0 4 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 23% +10% I KPFT Figures 1 (90.0 FM) 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0% Unavailable I KPRC I (950 AM) 5 1 14 2 2 0 2 0 0 4 23% +7% I KRBE I (104.1 FM) 6 2 7 1 0 0 2 1 0 3 32% +18% I KRLY I (93.7 FM) 7 2 9 1 0 0 1 3 0 3 35% +18% I KTRH, KLOL-FM I (740 AM, 101.1 FM) 15 6 29 8 7 0 7 1 1 11 31% +12% KULF, KYND-FM (790 AM, 92.5 FM) 8 1 20 1 2 0 5 2 0 8 26% +3% KXYZ, KAUM-FM % (1320 AM, 96.5 FM) 10 4 20 3 4 0 5 6 0 10 37% +8% KYOK (1590 AM) 6 1 7 4 0 0 4 1 1 6 40% +18% KDOG-TV (Channel 26) figures unavailable since 1975 KHOU-TV (Channel 11) 11 2 24 9 36 1 5 1 1 16 27% +5% I KHTV-TV (Channel 39) 10 1 16 6 28 6 4 0 0 12 30% +5% KPRC-TV (Channel 2) 15 6 34 7 67 2 3 2 5 18 22% +2% KTRK-TV (Channel 13) 10 2 24 8 38 3 5 2 4 25 33% +11% KUHT-TV (Channel 8) 4 3 10 12 22 1 0 0 2 3 33% +11% I TOTALS 147 44 299 80 217 13 66 35 17 150 746 32 I Percent women 1976 23% 21% 6% 35% 90% 30% I Percent change 1 since 1972 +14% +11% +5.7% +26% +4% +22% PACE 8 • MAY 1977 • HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH