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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Page 8
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 8. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4082.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4082

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 8, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4082.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_528h.jpg
Transcript views on careers Age Jan Carson: Will women be allowed to grow old gracefully on the television screens? This will be the real test: ability or looks. Will it be the young thing? Will I be allowed to anchor after I'm 40? I sincerely doubt it. Dana Millikin: They don't want to see wrinkles. Sondra Feldman: I don't think we will be x'ed out of the market. We will be veteran news reporters by then. Thelma Schoettker: Most of the youth craze is a local phenomenon. At the network level, women reporters are all in their 30's and 40's. It's still fairly new for a woman to be on the air here. They're not taking any chances. When I look at some of the male anchors, I think a woman couldn't get away with it. Voice Elma Barrera: Management felt something was wrong with our voices for years, but the public accepted us as soon as they put us on the air. Deborah Wrigley: Sometimes I did have to do real turkey jobs. A station I worked for sent me out on traffic reports, and I kept reminding them that I was hired as a reporter. One day I was doing live reports on President Ford's visit to Houston. In the middle of his speech, I was called on my two- way and told to file a traffic report in 60 seconds. So, I crawled under a table and reported that downtown streets were congested because of preparations for the motorcade. Soon after that a woman afternoon editor wrote the news director a letter on my behalf and they moved me out of traffic assignments to strictly news reporting. Sharon Blair: While I was working as a reporter, there was a women's abortion march. I covered the story. I had film, interviews, and went on the air live. I was attempting to do a very serious story. Later the news director said, That was a real cute story." Sondra Feldman: I was lucky. KTRH has a lot of women on its staff, so we were able to do stories Elma Barrera: So many women are doing hard news. Many stories would go unreported if news- women did not recommend their coverage so the very presence of women in the newsroom directly affects the news. Although there has been no basic change in broadcast management, Phyllis Deter is now the assignments editor at Channel 13. That's a good training spot for a news director position someday. Karen Lugar: I grew up with four brothers and played football and did a lot of athletic things. I also work on my own car. On remote, I take apart cameras and move all the film equipment. Some of the men on the crew are stronger than I am, but I help out the ones who have trouble moving those 10- foot risers. Thelma Schoettker: My presence made some of the male reporters able to recognize women's issues, and to be sensitive to issues, and to be sensitive to language . Like calling women "girls." I'm very optimistic. A new generation of men coming out of college will be in the media. I think you can tell a man's age by his attitudes. I want women to be powerful... We've got a lot of women in the media now. To get there, you had to do it like the guys. You had to be one of the guys. You had to shoot by their standards. You had to write by their standards. You had to report by their standards. We've got the troops now, so to speak. We don't have them in as high positions as we'd like and we won't get there without educating ourselves and supporting each other. We women in the newsrooms have got to get it together so that we're not just sending down household hints and news of demonstrations on the wire services — right now, puff or protest stories are all they have about women. We in the media have got to scream and fight and yell for those serious stories that are slowly creeping in on the network scene, like those on women's health. Ian Carson and I worked on a series on breast cancer. We learned so much. It was a very important story, but we couldn't get them to put it high in the cast. They didn't consider it as important as traffic accidents. Just wait till there's an epidemic of prostate cancer. It'll be the lead story. rL^^mrT^° be Powe'fu,J want us to P"" the sisters together and have some kind of camaraderie. That s our next hurdle. — Dana Millikin (see cover) JACKIE McCAULEY , KLOI Deborah Wrigley: I've always heard things like "A woman's voice sounds more apologetic and doesn't carry as much credibility as a man's." There aren't a lot of women DJs and it is almost a rule that they don't put a woman on morning (6 -10 a.m.) or afternoon (3-7 p.m.) drive time. Mildred Gaddis: I've got a heavy voice. I was hired over the phone by a news director who liked my voice, but they all say, "Let that Southern tongue go" or "Leave the drawl in Mississippi." Jackie McCauley: I've had no criticism because I've got a lot of bottom in my voice. A lot of bass and no regional accent since I've lived all over the world. JOB Leslie Davb: "Why don't you cover Julie Nixon Eisenhower and get the female point of view^they asked me one time. on subjects before they turned into hot copy, such as child abuse and battered wives. I've worked on fluff stories other places but I've had good assignments here. Mildred Gaddis: A story came up recently that Craig Washington asked to witness the first capital punishment execution. A guy in the newsroom told me, "Mildred, I'm so glad we've got you here to handle these kinds of things." PROGRESS Jackie McCauley: I see all the record promotion people. They are all male. Initially, when they walk in for the first time, they expect to see a man: Jack or Jackie. The thought processes start. She's attractive or whatever, but they talk to you and you can quickly convince them about how much you know about your work. They're testing to see what this title "program director" means. Once they find out, they take you seriously. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH • MAY 1977 • PAGE 7