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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 5. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4079.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4079

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 5, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4079.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_528e.jpg
Transcript REQILL ATTEMPTED By Karen Barrett This session's bid to recall Texas' ERA ratification was brought before the House Committee on Constitutional Amendments by Dallas conservative Rep. Clay Smothers. Several busloads of ERA supporters and opponents converged on the Capitol for the hearings on April 13. In the afternoon before the committee hearings were held, some 300 ERA opponents rallied on the steps of the Capitol, carrying pink helium balloons and sporting such mottoes as /Abort libbers, not babies! and Draft libbers, not ladies! They sang God Bless America and The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You and an original composition whose lyrics went something like: I've got a guy, he's a wonderful guy, please don't liberate me ...He buys me mink and pearls and diamond rings, please don't liberate me! The rally reached a peak of excitement when it was announced that the Florida Legislature had that very day defeated the ERA. The halls of the Capitol buzzed with nothing but the ERA all day long as people waited fo the full House to adjourn from its discussion of school budgets and teacher salaries. It was rumored that Anita Bryant was flying in to testify before the committee. Blustered one State employee in an elevator: "You know what I'd like to see happen to those women out there on the steps? I'd like to see each and every one of them have her husband run over by a truck tomorrow and see how she feels when she can't buy a car or mortgage the house." "Take it easy," someone else cautioned. "Where can I get a button?" was a question frequently heard. When the committee convened at 6:30 p.m., it heard 20-minute blocs of testimony, alternating pro and con, for more than four hours. The usual arguments were heard. Longtime ERA campaigner Hermine Tobolowsky, speaking for Texas Business and Professional Women's Clubs, reviewed the case for the Equal Rights Amendment. She pointed out that the five years which had elapsed since Texas passed a state ERA had not brought unisex bathrooms, legalized rape, or abolished child support. The suggestion had been made by ERA opponents that state and federal ERA passage in 1972 had been put over on a naive public who had not yet awakened to the sinister implications of such legislation. Committee chair Tim Von Dohlen (D-Goliad) asked Tobolowsky if there had not in fact been a high number of inexperienced first-term members in the 1972 session of the legislature. She answered firmly, "No!" Audrey Rowe Colom, chair of the National Women's Political Caucus, reaffirmed the support of the Republican National Party for the ERA. Meanwhile, those testifying in favor of Smothers' bill said ERA was unnecessary, it was evil, it meant that women would be drafted and homosexuals would marry and adopt other people's children. A minister from Pasadena said that it would lead to a genderless society by "destroying male ruggedness and female femininity." Liz Carpenter, chair of ERAme- rica, engaged everyone's attention with her colorful testimony (reprinted in part on page 2). She proposed that: Often the issue isn't ERA at all but a power play between power-mad legislators on other issues. That was true in North Carolina, where an arrogant lieutenant governor wanted to flex his muscles before the governor and the House of Representatives and, of course, it was women who were the victims — by two votes. The issue could have been anything — seat belts, conservation, schools. Smothers made a final plea to "let Texas make up for a bad, bad mistake" and urged the committee to let the full House vote on the bill. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Fort Worth), however, made a motion to refer it to subcommittee which passed 5-3. The bill's supporters were despondent, assuming that it would die in subcommittee. They milled about in the rotunda, discussing strategies for 1979. Said the minister from Pasadena who had testified: "Just to show you what kind of people are for the ERA — they were laughing at the Scriptures I was quoting more than at my opinions!" "That's because God just doesn't have the kind of pull he used to," replied a sympathetic bystander. # LEGISLATIVE ALERT # Complacency is our biggest enemy. People have forgotten how dearly won our rights were and they don't see that it's possible for someone to take them away. The other side — the ERA opponents and anti-abortionists — are very visible and vocal in Austin these days. We can't afford to sit home quiet just because bills like these were defeated last session; they could pass any day now! t p ' %m — Jody Richardson Women s Political Caucus lobbyist The 65th Session of the Texas Legislature is drawing to a close. As we go to press, the two bills discussed on these two pages have suddenly emerged from their committees and are certain to be put to the vote in the House. Next step is the Senate. Write to your legislators. Tell them how you feel about the following bills: 1) HB 35 is Clay Smothers9 bill to recall the ERA. Recall, which has never been done before and may be illegal, means taking Texas' vote back and thinking it over (as opposed to rescission, which means changing our vote on ERA to no). 2) HB1875, Tim Von Dohlen's bill to restrict abortion (see facing page) has his priority number on it, which means the House is obligated to vote on it. It has been reworded so as not to make Caesarean births illegal, but otherwise remains the same as when drafted. It will probably be voted on in the second week of May. This bill: a) seeks to restrict abortion by making certain methods illegal, which comes to the same thing as making abortion illegal, which is unconstitutional. It forbids saline abortions and requires a positive pregnancy test before any kind of abortional procedure, effectively making lUDs and morning-after pills illegal. b) contains provisions to allow the State Board of Health Resources the authority to redefine viability at its own discretion, without further legislation. They could redefine it at 12 weeks, for example. CARPENTER TESTIFIES LIZ CARPENTER AND AUDREY COLOM Reproductive Services, Inc. 6243 Dissonnet FREE PREGNANCY TESTS For information about additional services, call (713)771-4336 irTTJHTOi n. LA woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama -Houston 77006 • (713) 523-2521 PAGE 4 • MAY 1977 • HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH