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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 3. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4077

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977 - Page 3, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4096/show/4077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_528c.jpg
Transcript &i! Forgotten women The vacancy in the Houston City Comptroller's office had women, blacks and Chicanos vying for a foothold in city government. In no time at all, the situation became another test of strength among those groups which have never received adequate representation in either elective or appointive government positions. As soon as the possibility of an appointment was manifest, each group sought the City Council's consideration. The response from Council seemed clear: if this political prize was to go to any of the "have-not" groups, it would go to the one which could promise the most in return. So, once again, the people who share the onus of exclusion from the political system were unable to unify for their mutual benefit, but were thrust instead into fierce competition for the favor of City Hall. Small wonder that Council members found none of the names submitted to them acceptable and opted instead for the non-controversial appointment of the City Treasurer as caretaker for the Comptroller's office until November. It would seem that no single political minority is strong enough acting alone to have a significant impact on the power structure. It is only when we pool our political resources that we can gain leverage in the system. Why haven't effective coalitions among the "have-nots" been established? The idea is not a new one. The suggestion has been heard for years at political strategy meetings in all of the under-represented communities. But a sense of cooperation and trust has yet to be established. It appears that women would have much to offer such a coalition effort. However, women candidates have been consistently expected to step aside in favor of minority males. The idea prevails that lack of representation in government is not as serious a problem for women as for the ethnic minorities. Women are ready to work in harmony with other groups to gain access to the political power structure, but only when their needs for access and representation are given the same priority as the needs of any other minority. A true coalition needs to happen soon. Liz Carpenter, former press secretary to Lady Bird Johnson and current co-chair of ERAmerica (a force of 120 national organizations ranging from the American Bar Association to the Girl Scouts) testified for the ERA at committee hearings last month. The following is a transcript of some of her more memorable remarks: "l have been traveling in an effort to win support for ERA and I have met with many of the "no" votes in the state legislatures — the "fun and game" boys who would make the Equal Rights Amendment a political football. I've typed the kind of man who votes against it and while I am sure that none of these classifications would apply in Texas, I think you might like to hear who is voting "no" in other states. Representative Consensus: He doesn't want to take a stand until "you girls get together". We aren't going to get together any more than women were together on other issues — including the right to vote. Many who opposed the right to vote for women are using the same trite arguments: Why do we need it? Doesn't it open up unknown dangers? Doesn't it take away our femininity to go into a polling place? AN ECONOMIC BOYCOTT n I Thirty-five states have now ratified the ERA" but three more votes are necessary (for a total of 38, the required three-fourths of the states). The 15 states which have not yet ratified span the South, Midwest and West. Plan to vacatioQ elsewhere this summer. Alabama Arizona Arkansas Florida Georgia Illinois Louisiana Mississippi Missouri Nevada North Carolina Oklahoma South Carolina Utah Virginia Representative Master of the Castle: This is the man who never associates with women except in bed or the kitchen, and he wants to keep them there because of his own insecurity. He doesn't think marriage is a partnership. What he earns is his money. What property he buys is his property. THIS ISSUE Cover photo by Nancy Landau Art — Mark Stinson, Job Williams Circulation — Karen Barrett, Paula Herrera, Elizabeth Maxwell, Lynne Mutchler, Niami Smith, Sara Spahr Copy editing/Proofreading — Donna Adair, Sam E.J. Akers, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Nancy Daly Office — Frances Bellikoff, Janice Blue, Linda Niederhofer Photography — Janice Blue, Janis Fowles, Marilyn Jones, Nancy Landau, F. Carter Smith Production — Karen Barrett, Janice Blue, Deborah Diamond Hicks, Charley Kubricht, Ernie Shawver State-wide correspondents — Austin: Ann Kennedy Typesetting — Karen Barrett, Deborah Diamond Hicks, Linda Niederhofer EDITORIAL BOARD Gertrude Barnstone, Karen Barrett Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Vol. II, No. 5, May 1977, Houston Breakthrough is published monthly (with the exception of the July-August and December-January issues) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, Texas 77004. P.O. Box 88072, Houston, Texas 77004. Telephone: (713) 526-6686. Subscriptions $5.00 a year. 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60201. No part of this newspaper may be reproduced without permission. ©Houston Breakthrough Publishing Company PAGE 2 • MAY 1977 • HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Representative States' Rights: This is a man who suffers apoplexy every time the word "federal" or "Congress" is mentioned. He looks at the second section of the amendment, exactly like the second section of the 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 23rd, and 24th amendments and thinks there should be something different about the Equal Rights Amendment. Representative Apron Strings: He tells you, "Oh, I voted against it because my wife is against it." Now, there isn't one other issue where he would use this to justify a position on a vote. And often, he hasn't even asked her. Representative Postoffice: This is a member who doesn't lead, but is led, who takes the mail and weighs or counts which side can get the most letters in. He doesn't look at the quality of the argument or who generated the letter. And so he doesn't know that many of these letters come from the same people who got writer's cramp trying to impeach Earl Warren. Representative Macho: Here's one for you — he is a dirty old man who grew up as a dirty little boy. He enjoys sensational gossip, fed to him by the fear and smear artist, that the ERA will lead to co-ed bathrooms, trench warfare, and homosexual marriages. "Play me that old pornograph again," he says as he rails against it. None of these phases exist except in the Representative's mind. Governors of five states, where ERA has not only been ratified but put into the state constitution, have stated that not one of these allegations has come true. These are the usual types found in the handful of "no" votes which are keeping 52% of the population out of the Constitution. I hope we do not find them in Texas. I know a little bit about politics, and I assure you that the people who were against civil rights in the '60's, for the most part, are out of office. I firmly believe that those who are against equal rights will uTtimately also be out of office.