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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981
Page 8
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981 - Page 8. July 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3972/show/3967.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1981). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3972/show/3967

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981 - Page 8, July 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3972/show/3967.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_242h.jpg
Transcript Divorce proves top at mens congress By RICK NELSON Post Reporter Most delegates attending the National Congress for Men share a common bond. They were burned in a heated divorce. It's a main topic of their discussions, although they also plan to tackle larger issues. Saturday, the delegates met in work sessions, hammering out proposed resolutions to form a statement of policy for the fledgling group. Under discussion were such diverse topics as sexual stereotypes, the economic exploitation of males and the cultural portrayal of men. But the core issue of the convention Saturday — the one which generated the most interest and attendance — was the workshop on the discrimination toward men in divorce and child custody battles. "WE ALL HAVE THE same gripes, the same problems all over the U.S.," said Gerald Silver, head of the California Men's Rights Coalition. A bitter divorce is "more disruptive than losing a spouse to death,*' said Justus Baird, chief of the Houston Health Department's epidemology section, who chaired the workshop. "A (divorce) judge can only decide on what is brought before him, only what the lawyer tells him. That translates into how much justice you can buy," he said. Silver said he spent $22,000 during a three-year divorce action that he still speaks of bitterly. A central complaint in the workshop was that children often are used by battling spouses as weapons in a divorce proceeding. "A child has a right not to be divorced from either of his parents," one man argued during the conference. CONVERSELY, SILVER SAID he's found that children most often prefer to live with the most lenient parent. "They don't realize until later that the parent who had best interest of the child involved was the one who set the most limitations." Another delegate argued that assertive women file for divorce but don't assert themselves when it comes time to be financially independent. The Houston Area National Organization for Women sent a telegram Saturday offering congratulations and support for the men's rights convention. "We hope you will continue to solve the problems of inequality that face both men and women," Houston area NOW offered. The convention is scheduled to continue at the Airport Hilton Hotel Sunday, at which time a host of resolutions will be considered including: ■ Bills of Rights for families, children and children of divorce. ■ Recommending the revision of federal laws on child support payments. Under the current system, men can be 'arrested for not paying child support "just on a wife's word," Baird said. The congress hopes to tie child support to visitation rights. ■ Asking for an accountability of how child support payments are spent. ■ Supporting passage of the Equal Rights Ammendment and insisting it be applied to both males and females equally. ■ Finding "deplorable" the continued proliferation of stereotyped male and female roles in the media, fiction and advertising, including boycotts of such media. ■ Recommending the government be required to provide equal financing for research into men's and women's issues, specifically studies to determine various aspects of child custody-related matters. Hollywood reporter Rona Barrett, who left Good Morning America only to run into problems with Tom Snyder as co-host of Tomorrow, has figured out the source of her problems. Men at the top of the television industry feel threatened by take-charge women, she told Redbook magazine, adding, "Most of them have wives who are figurines. The day women take charge of finances is when theywill really be in controf and have power'.