Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981
Page 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981 - Page 3. July 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3972/show/3962.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1981). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3972/show/3962

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981 - Page 3, July 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3972/show/3962.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_242c.jpg
Transcript MESSAGES: SENT AND RECEIVEDI BYJEFFPRUGH © 1981, Los Angeles Times- Washington Post News Service ATLANTA — A series of at least 38 unsolved killings of Atlanta-area girls and women — most of them black and in their teens and 20s — has taken place since late in U.S. city?" Georgia state ftep^ Mildred Glover, Dh-Atianta, said Sunday. Glover jalso urged Mayor Maynard H. Jackson to relieve Brown of his command to the task force. "We need to treat this as a crisis now," she said; "It's no different than baseball. ; When you're in the fourth or fifth inning 1978 and has gone almost unnoticed be-j] and ym]re j^g ^^y you change pitch- cause of the attention focused on metropolitan Atlanta's case of .28 murdered young blacks, 26 of whom were males. These additional homicides have aroused so much alarm at City Hall that Mary Davis, w*ho heads the City Council's Pub- lie Safety Committee, said she has now asked Lee P. Brown, the city's public safety commissioner, to give the committee a list of all unsolved slayings in' Atlanta, "male and female, black and white." . " "We were concerned about so many* women being killed that we wanted to look at the other side of the coin," said Davis, whose committee asked for and received from Brown a list of homicides of black females here for 1978 through 1980. ers. t, It is believed by some observers that the number of unsolved slayings of females would exceed 38 if victims whose bodies were found in all suburbs and neighboring counties also were counted. That procedure is already used in the widely publicized case of black youths, ages 7 to 27, whose slayings here since July 1979 are being investigated by a special" police task force and FBI agents. "The potential number is so staggering that it's likely to be the worst problem of I unsolved murders in the history of any ! Look at the language of this editorial! 9 un- accountable/unelected men have made an untenable intrusion into the marketplace. Their decision trivialized the court which is to act only on the largest and most important issuas. The Supreme Court should "leave people alone and let them go back to handling their own affairs." I wonder if the Chronicle would feel the same if the issue were to do with freedom of the press? Oh, that's an important issue-and discrimination against women isn't. I hadn't realized. Brown, a target of frequent criticism ' because of the inability thus far of the *task force to solve the cases, has been ' steadfastly supported by Jackson, who appointed him in 1978. __ ^ Of the 28 young blacks whose slayings are now assigned to the task force, only1 two were girls. Angel Lanta/32, was strangled, and*LaTonya Wilson, 7, whose' cause of death was undetermined. Most of the other 38 female victims, who range in age between 14 and 60, were strangled or stabbed to death. Four of the 88 were white, including three young women who were found strangled in apartments during the last seven months and a girl, 15, who was found shot to death in 1979 — all in suburban DeKalb County, where bodies of some of the officially listed black males were discovered The headline should read that President Reagan immediately mobilized the Federal Bureau of Investigation to enter the investigation of this ghastly slaughter cjust as he did the the other murders that have taken place in Atlanta. It should, but it didn't—and 1 it probably never will. ] In re Tom Bass, Harris County Commissioner for Precinct 1: In a two page statement sent to Pat Kuhlmann he accepts the position that life that must be protected is present at conception, but castigates Pro-Life for single issue politics. Then he states that as an elected official he must represent his constituents and should not impose his religious beliefs on the public, but enough of them oppose abortion to withhold tax money from Jeff Davis' abortion clinic. Ill the midst of this is a statement that begs to be quoted: "We all hold life preci£ous, but it takes strong religious beliefs in the afterlife to believe that ultimately the abused child is better off than the unborn child." i * ^r- (f ,s ; the Supreme Court auit intruding? ti+bs-roiO Ofrt*V/CME nXu«>€ /^J^f/ When is the U.S. Supreme Court | gbjrig to get out of people's lives and \ quit intruding into every detail of how ■ Americans work and live ? I The American people did quite well for ground 200 years with minimal [attention in this respect from nine jutaelected and unaccountable men. 'But for some years now it seems that the Supreme Court has taken unto itself the position that it must be involved in the hour-by-hour functioning of jy American life. | ^Tbecojurt could hardly have provided a more vivid illustration of this meddling than in its recent 54 decision involving pay for women. The court has placed itself and the rest of tbe federal judiciary squarely in the position of assuming a right to judge how much an employee is worth, or conversely, is not worth. This was made inevitable when the court went beyond the question of equal pay for identical work and ruled in favor of a federal court right to make decisions 'ip the' vague realm of equal pay for non-identical work. It is an untenable intrusion into literally millions of individual judgments and decisions made weekly in the marketplace. In addition to all the other roles it has assumed, the Supreme Court has now set itself up as the national personnel manager. This is trivializing the Supreme Court. It was set up as a court of last resort to resolve only the largest and most difficult problems. The court has over the years now changed that concept to involve itself in the most minute facets of everyday activities. That is an endless, self-generating process. Each time the Supreme Court does it, there is opened up a whole new area of probing for federal court authority over ordinary private life and decision-making. The more the Supreme Court has intruded in this manner, the worse things have become. It should leave people alone and let them go back to handling their own affairs.