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Herizons, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1983
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Herizons, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1983 - Page 5. March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3831/show/3825.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1983). Herizons, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1983 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3831/show/3825

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Herizons, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1983 - Page 5, March 1983, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3831/show/3825.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Herizons, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1983
Publisher National Organization for Women at the University of Houston; Montrose Area National Organization for Women
Date March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .H47
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476034~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_215e.jpg
Transcript WHY MARCH 8? On March 8, 1857, women from the garment and textile industry in New York staged a demonstration protesting low wages, the 12-hour workday, and increasing workloads. They called for improved working conditions and equal pay for all working women. Their march was dispersed by the police, some of the women arrested, some trampled in the confusion. • Three years later, in March of 1860. these women formed their own union and called again for these demands to be met. • On March 8. 1308. thousands of women from the needles- trade industry demonstrated for the same demands, plus some new ones: legislation against child labor and for the right of women to vote. • In 1910. the German labor leader Clara Zetkin proposed that March 8 be proclaimed International Women's Day in memory of those earlier struggles of women for better lives. • Over the next 60 years. March 8 was celebrated mostly in socialist countries. By 1967, the day began to be celebrated by some groups in the United States. • In 1970. owing to the growing women's liberation movement, events were planned to celebrate the day m most of the major cities of the United States. • In the past five years it has become a widely celebrated day for most women's organizations and groups. Rallies, forums, panels, conferences, demonstrations, radio programs, media shows, and school programs will all be part of the 1983 celebration of women's rights and their contributions to the history and culture of the world. —Berkeley Unified School District Women s Studies Program HISTORY? HERSTORY? 0URST0RY! Some sage has observed that those who do not know their own history are condemned to relive it. When one thinks about women and "history", it is clear that for millenia we have, women and men, "relived" a history that excluded women from consideration. More specifically, those of us who are feminists have historical origins which we ignore at great peril. The bibliography that follows is culled from a much longer list I would have liked to include. Each entry is "a good read" as well as essential to our understanding. I suggest choosing from the early part of the list first. Jo Ann Evansgardner Eleanor Flexner, Century of Struggle - The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States (Revsd edrTJ Belknap Press, Harvard University Press Cambridge, 1975 (originally 1959) Ellen Carol Dubois Feminism and Suffrage Cornell University Press, Ithaca NY 1973 Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan Brownell Anthony and Mathilda Joslyn Gage History of Woman Suffrage (6 volumes containing speeches, letters, essays, published 1881- 1922) A good selection from this massive work is available in a volume edited by Mari Jo & Paul Buhle, The Concise History of Woman Suffrage, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1978 Gerda Lerner Black Women in White America - A Documentary History Vintage Book, Random House, NY 1972 Elinor Rice Hays Lucy Stone: One of America's First and Greatest Feminists Tower Publ ications, MCMLXI (Originally Morning Star: A Biography of Lucy Stone, 1818-1893) Inez Haynes Irwin Up Hill With Banners Flying the Woman's Party. Traversity Press, Penobs (republished as The Alice Paul Story Denlinger's Publishers, Fairfax, VA 19771 The Story of aversity Press, Penobscot, ME 1964 Carrie Chapman Catt and Politics. (1923 Press, Seattle, WA & Nettie Rogers Shuler Woman Suffrage pb edition University of Washington 1956 Blanche Weisen Cook (Ed) Crystal Eastman - On Women & Revolution Oxford University Press, Oxford 1978 Midge Mackenzie Shoulder to Shoulder (the TV Documentary on the English Suffragettes, in their own words, with pictures) A. Knopf, 1975 Women's History Week "Women's experience encompasses all that is human; they share - and have always shared - the world equally with men." Gerda Lerner Throughout the history of our world women of all races, ages, cultures, and religious faiths have made innumerable contributions to the advancement and civilization of people. Many of these efforts have gone unrecognized because history has been recorded from a masculine perspective. This interpretation of history leaves us with only half the picture of an experience which includes both women and men. Women's History Week, March 6-12, has been set aside to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of women in history. The idea of celebrating Women's History Week was first initiated by members of the Sonoma County Commission on the Status of Women (Santa Rosa, CA) in 1978. By 1981, the week which includes International Women's Day was proclaimed by a joint resolution of Congress an official observance. For 1983 Rep. Barbara Mikulski (D.- MD) and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R. - UT) introduced the following resolution which became law. " ... Whereas American women have played and continue to play a critical economic, cultural, and social role in every sphere of our nation's life by constituting a significant portion of the labor force in and outside the home ... Whereas despite these contributions, the role of American women in history has been consistently overlooked and undervalued in the body of American history: NOW, therefore, let it be resolved ... that the week beginning March 6, 1983, is designated "Women's History Week" and the President is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe such week with appropriate ceremonies and activities." On Monday through Friday during the week of March 16, 1983, NOW at UH will participate in Women's History Week by presenting a series of lectures beginning at 12 noon at the A. D. Bruce Religion Center at the University. The complete list of speakers and topics will be found in our FEMINIST CALENDAR FOR MARCH. See also the enclosed flyer. Cindy Funderburke Helen Wilma Ortiz Gerda Lerner The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina - Rebels Against Slavery Houghton Mifflin, Boston 1967 Mary Beth Norton Liberty's Daughters The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750 -1800) Little, Brown & "Cot Boston, 198U Gerda Lerner The Majority Finds its Past - Placing Women in History. Oxford University Press, NY 1979 Jo Freeman The Politics of Women's Liberation David McKay, NY 1975 Judith Hole & Ellen Levine Rebirth of Feminism Quadrangle Books, NY 1971 (revised 1977)