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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 11, November 1981
Page 4
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 11, November 1981 - Page 4. November 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3802/show/3795.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1981). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 11, November 1981 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3802/show/3795

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 11, November 1981 - Page 4, November 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3802/show/3795.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 11, November 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date November 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 4
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File Name femin_201109_246d.jpg
Transcript Report in absentia from Jeanne Saletan on details of Womenfs Lobby Alliance Workshop on November 21 (see Calendar). Report in absentia from Susan Lab on fundraising materials ordered. There will be note cards and other interesting and different materials on display and for sale at the Program meeting November 5 Reports on scheduled events in November of BANOW interest (see Calendar). Discussion of arranging for a booth at the next Women's Career Conference in January. Decision to contact National At-Large members in this area via newsletter and survey. Over 100 non-affiliated people on National list. Proposed dropping NOW phone at Phyllis Tucker's residence. Suggested discussion with NOW Council which meets 10/22, Also discussed 10/23 meeting between NOW and Bell with our attorney. Postpone final decision till ll/5 meeting. Rema Lou Brown Social Issues- The greatest controversies of all may come from a potpourri of conservative concerns sacred to Reagan's New Right supporters if not necessarily to the President, which include abortion, school prayer and busing. Already introduced in Congress are a Human Life Bill, which would protect the rights of the unborn from the moment of conception, and a Family Protection Act, which seeks to reinforce "traditional" moral values by giving parents more control over such things as sex education. Reagan and his advisers indicate that they will support but not take the lead in fighting for this type ot legislation. . Striking at Reagan, of course, is a touchy matter since conservatives, includ- ing helms, are personally so fond of him. The President has already shown a will- ingness to compromise with the moder- ates, however, and the intransigent Helms will tolerate little of that. His constituents are complaining, he says, and Helms agrees with them. Says he: "the people who fought and bled and died for Rea- gan have not been listened to. He's got to remember who took him to the dance." For all his growing strength, Helms is not a charismatic man. People are stirred far less by his presences than by the fundamental message he preaches. He is moralistic, railing about good and eve, often simplistic and polarizing. His soft voice is a kind of disguise for the words he speaks. He has a mean streak and can be cruel to his opponents, taking public note, for example, of Senator Ted Kennedy's swimming skills. Raleigh, his home town now, is head- quarters of the Congressional Club. He creatd the club in 1973 to pay off his cam- paign debs. By the time he ran for a sec- ond term in 1978, the club was staffed by 150 people and raised almost $8 million for his re-election and another $8 million in 1980. Its heavy impact is feared by many Democrats. Club mailings and TV ads are hard-hitting, sometimes vicious. The club backd John East for the Sen- ate in North Carolina last fall, for ex- ample, and so mangled the record of his opponent, conservative Democratic Sen- ator Robert Morgan, that Morgan looked like a liberal. At the same time, the club's skillfully edited TV ads in favor of East made him look so vigorous that most peo- ple in the state were unaware until after the election that the new Senator is a vic- tim of polio and confined to a wheelchair. The clb makes itself felt in races all across the country. Dedicated to the de- feat of liberals, it issued tens of thousands of mailings to document the voting rec- ords of Democrastic Senators on such is- sues as prayer in schools, abortion and sex education. Some of the letters dray angry fire. When one mailing in Ohio charged that Senator John Glenn's vote on the liberalization of the Hatch Act was intended to turn the Government over to labor unions, Glenn angrily confronted Helms and demanded the messages be stopped. helms apologized, told Glenn he was unaware that his signature was on them. Robert Morgan in defeat in even more alarmed: "You can't believe how this group scares people, including Sen- ators when they vote.