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University of Houston NOW Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 4, September 1981
Page 5
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University of Houston NOW Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 4, September 1981 - Page 5. September 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3729/show/3727.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1981). University of Houston NOW Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 4, September 1981 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3729/show/3727

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

University of Houston NOW Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 4, September 1981 - Page 5, September 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3729/show/3727.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title University of Houston NOW Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 4, September 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, University of Houston Chapter.
Date September 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N684
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476015~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_233e.jpg
Transcript newsclips Sunday, Au_i$_%f^"^ "'Houston ChronicST Taking up sewing for a With Gov. William P. Clements Jr. waiting in his inner office to discuss legislation, Lt. Gov. Bill Hobby, right, waits impatiently as staff member Karen Newman sews a button on his coat. There s something very strange going on here. I mean he waits impatiently? What's that smirk on his face? This is really a very humiliating photo. Certainly it's not one a friend - (and I wonder if he is one in his lord it over her stance) - would allow taken. A high class Kiss . What a shame. BECKET EPBIOTOMY Doctors are surgically enlarging the vaginal openings of many women during childbirth even though the benefits of this routine practice have not been proven, two government researchers said recently. The researchers, in a report to be published through the medical journal Women and Health, said that the surgical cut, called an epislotomy, is useful in some difficult deliveries but has become a routine and unnecessary practice in many delivery rooms. The procedure increases the risk of infection and protracted pain after delivery, and should be used with care, they said. Government health statistics show that incisions to enlarge the vagina are done in about 70 percent of all non-Caesa- rean section births in the ' United States. And their « study of medical literature indicates that up to 90 : percent of all women in this country giving birth for the first time have episiotomies if they don't have Caesareans, they said. No-fuS6 contraceptive: Six hollow rods, packed with chemicals and implanted in women's arms, have been providing birth control for five to seven years in tests under way abroad. The long-Lasting and no-fuss method of contraception is believed by some scientists to be capable of lasting 10 years. Dr. Harold Nash of the Population Council, which Is overseeing the research, said the rods are about the thickness of a wooden kitchen match and one-and-one-quarter-inches . long. They are filled with the steroid Levonargestrel. Nash said in an interview that the rods are injected, one at a time, into the inside forearm or inside upper arnu They are placed just beneath the skin. He said an advantage of the implants in the arm is that over the years they stay pretty much where they have been . put and do not "migrate" the way some long-lasting implants have when placed elsewhere. The tubes are silastic, or rubber-Like. The chemical Inside dif-uses through tube walls. Nash, associate director of the Council's Center for Biomedical Research, said tests with the arm tube contraceptive method are part of studies going on in Brazil, Chile, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Denmark and Finland. To turn off the contraception via implant, scientists said, the rods must be removed. (UPI) The Houston Post/Fri., July 31, 1981 WASHINGTON — The House voted Thursday to bar government workers from using federal health insurance coverage to pay for abortions except when the mother's life is endangered. The action came on a 253467 vote to approve an amendment by Rep. John Ashbrook, R-Ohio, to the 1982 Treasury-Postal Service appropriations bill. The House then approved the entire appropriations bill and sent it to the Senate. Ashbrook said it was similar to the abortion bans Congress has imposed on federal programs like Medicaid. But its critics, calling it a dangerous precedent, said the ban was "many, many steps bevond what we have done in other forms of anti-abortion amendments." Contending the ban makes "second-class citizens of female federal workers, they raised the specter that Congress could move in the future to extend the ban to health insurance policies covering workers in private industry. The ban would take effect after the last day of the health insurance contracts currently in effect. llieSm^estWa_-;tUnes in History Fashions come and go, and so ckj tastes in waists. The American "perfect figure** is often touted as **36-24-36." But some lovely ladies have measured in at nearly half that around the middle. On the chubby side of this list is Anna Held, who was imported from France by Florenz Ziegfekl for his glamorous Follies. The "hourglass girl" (who later rfiarried Ziegfeld) ha4 an 18-inch waist. Catherine de Medici. Queen or France, .was a 16-incher who decreed j that the waists of her ladies-in-waiting | must measure no more than 13 inches, j Mademoiselle Polaire was a French j stage actress who died in 1939 Her mere t 13 inches are rivaled today by Ethel j Granger of f^terborough in Britain. This! 76-year-old housewife has maintained at j least part of her girlish figure—a 13-inch j waist. __ . . - _ ■ 1 QUESTION: What is common to these four articles? ANSWER: Pain for women. Researchers say men could bear babies MELBOURNE, Australia (UPI) - It is theoretically possible for men to bear children, two eminent Australian researchers said in an interview published Thursday. Prof. Geoffrey Thorburn and Dr. Richard Harding of Monash University told the Melbourne Age newspaper there is no biological reason why an embryo fertilized in a laboratory could not be implanted in a man's abdomen where it would mature and be delivered by Caesarian section. The two men, who have studied the capability of the fetus to regulate its own envelopment, said research indicate.* .•' etus and the placenta are the rr. . sources of hormones in pregnancy an J manipulate the mother, rather than vice vei-sa as previously thought. "There is more and more evidence that the fetus is a very clever parasite and many.of the changes which occur through pregnancy are the mother responding to the tune being played on her by the fetus," Thorburn told the Age. Thorburn emphasized, though, he would never advocate male child- bearing. If a fetus is implanted in a man, it might produce the same changes women undergo during pregnancy, such as morning sickness and breast development. There were also such hazards as the fetus attaching to the wrong place ana problems regarding the placenta, he said. Prof. Carl Wood, of Monash University's test-tube baby program — which has resulted in 11 test-tube births — said embryos had been successfully implanted in male mice. He also noted women occasionally give birth to babies with placentas attached to an internal organ other than the uterus, such as the bowel.