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Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1976
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1976 - Page 4. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3297/show/3288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1976 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3297/show/3288

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1976 - Page 4, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3297/show/3288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1976
Date February 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_415d.jpg
Transcript BOOKS The Female Man by Joanna Russ an incredibly feminist-lesbian science fiction view of time/space travel, wonderful, i loved reading it. but more than that, it stays with me. it's been weeks since i read it and still several times a day i recall something from the book, and not just recall it. but react to it. react with much intensity, the full gamut of emotions: love, hate, fear, delight, dread, absolute pleasure, discomfort, everything, sometimes several at once. written by a woman, of course, and of course i suspect she's both a feminist and a lesbian, cannot imagine that one could write something like this and be otherwise. story of four women (one of the main characters isn't introduced until the last third of the book or later), they live in different probabilities of earth, they meet and interact with each other and others from their respective worlds, the one who drew most of my attention most quickly (quite deliberately on the author's part i'm sure) was a place called Whileaway. there were no men on whileaway and hadn't been for 8 or 9 centuries, that was certainly an interesting thought. one of the most delightful passages in the whole book was one in which janet from whileaway was doing a tv talk show in new york in 1969 and was asked by a (male) moderator if the women on whileaway were excited about the possibility of visits of men from earth, she couldn't quite get the point of what he meant (you know of course) until he finally had to discreetly hint that he was referring to their lack of sexual love. she: oh! you mean copulation. he: yes. she: and you say we don't have that?! he: yes. she: how foolish of you. of course we do. he: ah? (he wants to say, "don't tell me.") she: with each other, allow me to explain. needless to say she was cut off the air before the explanation spewed forth. i loved the frankness, i loved his embarassment which i perceived to be great, and i loved her response to him which was irritation, even rudeness, not embarassment to his embarassment. (a "normal" woman's reaction.) jeanine was from a probability similar to ours in the 1960's and is probably just the epitome of "normal" schizophrenic woman here and now. wanted intensely to get married because she wanted to believe that would magically settle all her frustrations, hostilities, confusions, etc. she knew it wouldn't but wanted to think it would, naturally, there was a lot of outside pressure in that direction. she nearly succumbed, but didn't; to tell you why she changed would spoil the effect of the entire book, i think, too bad. i'd love to.