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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 2, February 1980
Page 2
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 2, February 1980 - Page 2. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3162/show/3153.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 2, February 1980 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3162/show/3153

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 2, February 1980 - Page 2, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3162/show/3153.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 2, February 1980
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_394b.jpg
Transcript Pat Hoyt and Fai Coffin are part of a womenfs caucus of the Philadelphia Working Class Support Group. Pat is in an MNS-affiliated neighborhood organizing collective. She is excited about her work teaching young children. Fai is developing her writing skills on class issues. She is working on creating and teaching consciousness- raising groups on class. fRot* PANDGLiCM -ft ^zouRUhu&& toweweHT foK ft H&S 9>aerY Women and Class by Pat Hoyt and Fai Coffin Both men and women are oppressed by the class system. But the effects on attitudes, expectations, roles we play, our dreams and our hurts are very different. There is a double and triple oppression which Third World and working class women must constantly deal with. Most working class women are conditioned early in life to have low expectations. This especially affects how they view themselves and their future. Expectations are limited not only because of sexism but because financial resources and privileges are not available to consider other options. Working class women are not expected or educated to be "social changers." They are trained to do the more repetitive, less desirable, lower paying and less respected jobs, as defined by society. It is assumed that they will fill the nurturing and supportive roles in the family and society. This often includes bearing the brunt of working class men's frustrations with their lives and work. Working class women have internalized many hurts. They blame themselves or their families for the disappointments in their lives, rather than looking at the problems of the society in which they live. Feelings of inadequacy and inferiority are very strong. Many women are conditioned early on (by the family, schools, often by religious institutions) to believe that some educational opportunities are denied to them because they lack intelligence. Feelings of inferiority remain with many women despite degrees or other achievements, making it difficult for working class women to speak up, join in discussions, write, and think strategically. Even in radical groups, women with lower class backgrounds tend to fill the nurturing and supportive roles, and to do the nitty-gritty work. Working class women must work through a lot of feelings to assume leadership roles, to participate in decisions, and to think strategically. There are many classist attitudes and assumptions that hurt working class women. Classism is found in left and liberal groups, for example, believing the stereotype of Edith Bunker, a devoted mother and wife but not one who can think well, make decisions, or wield power. Working class women are blamed for being siore conservative and less political, often by people who are totally unaware of the reasons. Correcting z Narrow Feminism Class differences are a source of division in the women's movement. Many working class women are alienated from the women's movement because feminists have too often ignored working class concerns. We believe that a vision of a feminist society must include the struggles of class, race and age. A (i) MAhlht£rt£NT iMENONL^v WE CAM1T HAVE WOMEN IN HERE! (2) WOMEN AREN'T LOGICAL! WOMEN AREN'T REASONABLE! C**t. MVf pO$t^