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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, [No. 4], April 1979
Page 8
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, [No. 4], April 1979 - Page 8. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 15, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2918/show/2913.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, [No. 4], April 1979 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2918/show/2913

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, [No. 4], April 1979 - Page 8, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 15, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2918/show/2913.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, [No. 4], April 1979
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_384h.jpg
Transcript A16 The Editorial Notebook THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY. MARCH «, 1979 The Religious Case for Abortion Rights There has at last been an interesting intellectual departure in the heated debate over abortion policy. Under cur- rent law, the Federal Medicaid pro* gram pays all valid medical expenses for poor women, but does not pay for abortions, except in the case of rape, incest, or serious health threat to the mother. A case in the Brooklyn court of Federal District Judge John Dooliag,McRae v. Califcmd, attacks the law on various grounds, but it is its claim of First Amendment rights that raises provocative questionf about the law's religious neutrality. The case is a class action brought on behalf of all Medicaid-eligible worsen by several civil liberties and church groups. They argue that the current Medicaid statute puts into law the religious dogma of those who view the fetus as a human being from the moment an egg is fertilized. To the Roman Catholic Church, for example, all abortion is murder. Orthodox Jews and some Protestant sects condone abortion only when the mother's life is threatened. The plaintiffs contend that current law strongly reflects such views and, therefore, denies some poor women the right to exercise their belief. This proposition is viewed by %>me as an attack on political advocacy by, religions in genera), and by the Catholic Church in particular. The Catholic journal, Commonweal, recently asked angrily "De Catholics Have Constitutional Rights?" The plaintiffs do not, however, claim that the Catholic Church—or #uiy other religious group — must remain njute on public issues. Nor do they suggest that poor women have an inalienable right to Medicaid for abortions. But they do make three important arguments: e They say that some women do, in fact, have a religious reason for seeking an abortion. Some non^Orthodox Jews, for example, believe that abortion may be required t<f preserve a . woman's physical or mental health. Various -protestant denominations teach that responsible parenthood may sometimes require ending a pregnancy. Many Baptist groups believe that the abortion decision should be a matter of personal conscience. e The suit asserts that the law is unfair. If the Government were to end Medicaid benefits for all pregnant women — whether .they have babies or abortions — it would be religiously neutral and not an abuse of anyone's First Amendment rights. But to deny poor women funds for an abortion is a denial of religious freedom. •The plaintiffs suggest that for Government to overlook such religious claims, it must have a secular purpose. But the current law does not. It saves no money. It is not part of some national population policy. It does not protect women's health. If anything, it drives them to unqualified abortionists. ^ Repeated Congressional debate leaves little doubt that the current law is intended to protect the fetus as if it were a human being from the day of conception and as if abortion, in most cases, is murder. This view of the nature of life is a matter of faith or religion, not universally shared by the public, nor, indeed, by the Supreme Court. It deserves to be challenged in court. Some describe this challenge as divisive and as a threat to harmony in our pluralistic society. On the contrary; that threat is posed not by the case but by the law it would undo. SOMA GOLDEN The untold story of the World War II women pilots -theWASPs- who flew every war plane the U.S. had. Those Wonderful Women In Their Flying Machines THE UNKNOWN HEROINES OF WORLD WAR II Sally Van Wagenen Keil This book brings to light one of the most extraordinary sagas in U.S. military aviation, the story of the women, more than a thousand of them, who became the Women's Airforce Service Pilots in Wforld War n. They flew - over 60 minion miles - in every plane in America's air arsenal, from the P-51 Mustang fighter to the B-29 Superfortress. And when the war ended they were disbanded and forgotten. "In this affectionate but savvy book... Sally Keil has captured the flavor of these vulnerable, game women who took on the toughestUj the Army could give them - and did them sue a, - N. Y.TkrttsBook Review At all bookstores. Illus. with photographs. $10.95 630 Third Avenue, Wew York 10017 i (Distributed by Atheneum). Women Pilots Eligible For Veterans9Benefits] A WASHINGTON, March 9 (AP) Women pilots who ferried military planes in World War II wen their fight today to be recognized as service veterans. . John C. Stetson, Secretary of the Air Force, announced that 1,097 Women's! Air Forces Service Pilots who flewl planes for the Army Air Corps between ? Sept. 10,1942, and Dec. 20,1344, would S be considered to have served cm active military service and wouldfcecome el' gible-for benefits admifiisteied'by f Veterans Administration.