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Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976 - Page 11. June 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/29/show/25.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976). Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/29/show/25

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976 - Page 11, June 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/29/show/25.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976
Date June 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_418m.jpg
Transcript The Fierce Sound: Women's Poetry "I say live, live because of the sun, the dream, the excitable gift." Anne Sexton (poet) 1969 What is that sun, that dream, that excitable gift? It is writing; it is the unexplainable force of words; it is the flow of the language of the soul: poetry. For women writers, writing transcends art. It is universally personal. Women writing become the spokesperson for their sex. For centuries, only on paper (and often under a male pseudonym or anonymously) could a woman express her views and explore her visions. Consciousness-raising has always existed in the form of women communicating through words on paper their feelings about themselves, their work, their relationships, their lives; writing is the utilization of psychic energy and the foundation of a female culture. The lack of acknowledged women in literature is not an indication of the shortage of women writing, but of the huge lack of encouragement that a woman receives. In her exquisite essay, A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf notes the obstacles: "...there would always be the assertion...you cannot do this, you are incapable of doing that... to protest against, to overcome." What it comes down to is a question of value and self worth. We must come to a perception of the validity of what we have to say. An Austin poet, Nina, elaborates: "Aside from our objective lack of control over the means of production and distribution of the printed word, the biggest thing we are up against is the ingrained conviction that no one wants to hear what women have to say-—this translates to 'Women have nothing to say' which translates to 'I have nothing to say' which results in the waste of a lot of things that should be said, both for the lost creator and the deprived audience." It appears that women's writings have been suppressed for their straightforward honesty and examination of what women's lives are really like and what we actually feel. Men have depicted our lives and feelings as they would like to see them. In literature, women emerge as myths. Truth vanishes. The realities of what we are must be revived in our own words. Robin Morgan, activist poet, says, "Culture is breath, it is oxygen to us as an oppressed people who have never spoken before in our own words." The first woman to earn her living writing, Aphra Behn, also earned the labels "one of the rakes of the time" and "not at all a lady". She wrote seventeen plays and much poetry. She was no doubt a phenomenon of her time working with a minimum of support and few avenues to submit her work. Today, however, women have risen up out of obscurity to offer support to each other. That support has given birth to one hundred and seventy-one women-written and women-produced papers in this country. Writing is a process. How does it start? When does a poem first begin? What is its and its author's growth like? The process of writing is all the torment and joy of giving birth to oneself again and again. Nina speaks: 13