Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976
Page 7
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976 - Page 7. June 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/29/show/21.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976). Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/29/show/21

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976 - Page 7, June 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/29/show/21.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 5, June 1976
Date June 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_418i.jpg
Transcript TH€ PH€NOM€NON CALL€D M€G "Meg Christian" is more than a one- woman phenomenon. As Meg herself would be the first to tell you, her influence is the result of a tremendous effort on the part of five very dedicated women who together comprise the Olivia Records' women's music collective—Meg, Ginny Berson, Jennifer Woodul, Kate Winter, and Judy Dlugacz. If you could get to the core of Meg Christian herself, you would find an intense, very pure commitment to women. It's that commitment, combined with extraordinary musical skill and her recognition of the power of music, that have made Meg and Olivia Records a major pioneering force in the field of women's music. Sundancer Photographic Studies The following is Part 1 of an interview with Meg and Ginny Berson that was recorded when they were in Houston during their recent concert tour. Part 2 of the interview, which will present more of their political views, will be printed in conjunction with our upcoming issue on 'Separatism". ON WOMEN'S MUSIC Meg: "To me, women's music is music that speaks honestly and realistically to women about their lives. It is a way to communicate ideas and real gut level feelings and bonds that women have in a way that nothing else can. What I generally try to do in my concerts is to make women think about all the different kinds of options, possibilities, responsibilities, and risks that it's crucial we face for us to really make a revolution. I try to present songs that make women feel good about themselves for the first time, or make women start thinking about feminism politically, or make a woman want to deal with loving other women, or putting all her different kinds of energies into women, or perhaps dealing with the fact that Lesbianism is political. Lesbianism is, for me, the crucial political step in women really supporting one another and making a revolution. As political women, we have the responsibility to work to make it easier for other women to come out and put all their energies into women. We also have the responsibility to create a truly alternative living situation for women that will help us take control of our lives. Two other issues important for me to stress in my concerts are issues of class and race- how white middle class women have used class and race privileges to oppress other women, and how that's kept our movement divided. We really have to deal with that immediately. The other is the issue of separatism—understanding what male supremacy and male and heterosexual privilege mean, and how women putting energy into men perpetuates the oppression of women." MEG'S FIRST STEP (Regarding lesbianism): been literally lusting after I was five years old." "I have women since (Regarding women's music): "Well, there were a number of things that made me jump out on a limb. One was absolute and total disgust with the nightclub situation. I had gotten to the point where in terms of the physical environment and the financial situation, I knew I had as good a set-up in a nightclub as I could have. But I just got to a point where singing for all those men in a situation that was so totally con-