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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1973
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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1973 - Page 4. March 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2862/show/2857.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1973). Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1973 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2862/show/2857

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1973 - Page 4, March 1973, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2862/show/2857.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1973
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date March 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 4
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_079d.jpg
Transcript Page 4 BROADSIDE March 1973 WAS GRANDMA REALLY LIBERATED? The February business/program meeting was the last of its kind. After some discussion, the membership agreed to separate business and program meetings with the hope that program meetings would attract outsiders (potential new members) and business meetings would include more thorough discussion. Program meetings will be the first Wednesday of the month and business, the third Wednesday; both will meet at UH Student Center. In other business, Ann McClung was asked to report to the organization regularly. Gently retaliating, she asked members to pay their dues for 1973 (and 1972!) Funds for the Feminist Film Festival were appropriated, to be reimbursed through contributors. Bonnie Burnett announced the beginning of the Day Care Task Force. If you wish to give blood for the nationwide ERA ratification fund, contact Helen Cassidy. For the program, Carol Weiner, Ph. D. historian, spoke on the Victorian woman. Although we think of the Victorian woman as a very unlib- rated woman, she was actually quite liberated as compared to her grandmother. The Victorian era saw the elevation of the woman's job in the home to a science — home economics. Woman became the "angef'in the' House" or the "queen of the home." The Victorians made the woman's, job in the home respectable and with this respectability came new plateaus of responsibility. Among the Victorian victories for women were higher education, property rights, guardianship of children, and finally the right to vote. Until the 19th century, the father retained legal (and moral) guardianship of the children. Women were not considered wise or moral enough to rear children past infancy. When guardianship switched to women, more education, both mental and spiritual, was required for them. Woman came to embody all moral principles. The change to "angel" caused an about-face in the meaning of womanhood. Before the 19th century, women were considered to be Eves, fallen temptresses ~ lusty and insatiable in bed. (This negative association may be a product of the superstitious views of menstruation and childbirth as unclean.) To the Victorians, however, women were too pure for carnal interests. The pricetag for becoming the "angel in the house" was giving up a good time in bed and frigidity. Even feminists of the time felt themselves superior to men because women were thought to be basically asexual. The most important result of the emerging Victorian woman was the growth of female class consciousness as a result of the newly-defined tasks of the homemaker. To carry out their roles as homemakers and childrearers, women needed power — the vote. Weiner confidently concluded that feminism could never have existed without the Victorian vision of womanhood. NOW ACTIONS ACROSS THE COUNTRY CALIFORNIA The San Diego chapter of NOW has compiled a documented study of sex discrimination 1n the community college facilities of that area, and has called for a class investigation of the discriminatory policies and hiring practices of all the San Diego community colleges. One college has already been Investigated by the Cali- fornia Fair Employment Practices CcMn1ss1on. ILLINOIS Chicago Women 1n Broadcasting, a group of some 100 women working in that Industry, recently completed a study of television station personnel in Chicago.~ (Figures are incomplete in some cases because- NBC stated that it is against network policy to disclose statistics other than their 1971 headcount0 Of the total number of.employees, 1,287 are men, 388 are women; total executives: 152 men, 39 women; engineers and technicians: 309 men, 5 women; and, sales persons: 30 men, 3 women. LOUISIANA Members of Baton Rouge NOW are meeting with representatives of local TV and radio stations in view of the fact that all FCC radio and TV licenses in Louisiana come up for renewal March 1. NOW has presented station management personnel with guidelines for the treatment of women in terms of image, programming and employment. TASK FORCE TO OPEN CLINIC The first step toward gaining control of our own bodies must come by tearing down the walls of ignorance. Women have been raised in our sexist society to look at our bodies through men's definitions. What we wear and how we look is programmed into us by male controlled media, men friends, husbands, fathers, brothers, and often unintentially by sisters. We have gross misinformation given to us by the male medical profession who have been the sole repositors of gynecological knowledge. Women are anesthetized from the navel to the knees beginning in our early years with, "Don't touch", "Don't look". In order to improve our health care services, we need to know what good health care is for our bodies. In order to challenge the existing relations of power, we must learn basic health care skills and help one another to this knowledge. From this philosophy came the Self Help Clinic Concept. Self Help Clinics are small groups of women who meet to learn more about their bodies through self examination. The group observes cervical changes, common infections, ranges of normality, effects of birth control methods, and thoroughly discusses the myths, misconceptions and hang ups we as women are all prey to. It compares what "authorities" say about our women's bodies to what is really going on. In these ways women come to know the workings of their bodies in a matter-of-fact common sense way. The Reproduction Task Force is currently in the process of organizing a Self Help Clinic for Houston. Volunteers are needed to help set up facilities in the Women's Center. The Task Force is seeking to find sympathetic gynecologists and gynecological nurses to assist in instructing those who will participate in the clinic. This clinic is not a substitute for for medical care. It is an adjunct to such care. It is hoped that through a better familiarity with a woman's own body, she may be better able to decide for herself the necessity and nature of her gynecological needs.