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Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972
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Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972 - Page 8. September 1972. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2809/show/2806.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1972). Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2809/show/2806

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972 - Page 8, September 1972, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2809/show/2806.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date September 1972
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_085h.jpg
Transcript Page 8 BROADSIDE September 1 972 Recommended Feminist Reading One of the effects of the growing Revolution has been the emergence of a number of women's movement publications. Some are angry and some are humorous, but each is important. THE SECOND WAVE:A MAGAZINE OF THE NEW FEMINISM. Recent articles included an interview with Anias Nin, a report of a strike by waitresses and a debate on prostitution and the law. Published quarterly, $3. Box 303, Kenmore Square Station, Boston, Mass. 02215. SHAMELESS HUSSY REVIEW. A collection of poetry and drawings by women, edited and printed by Alta. Published annually, 75 cents. Box 424, San Lorenzo, Calif. W0MEN(A JOURNAL OF LIBERATION). A recent issue contained articles on Chicago women's liberation, women in law, poetry, short stories, and a bibliography. Published quarterly, $4. 3028 Greenmount Ave., Baltimore, Md. WOMEN'S RIGHTS LAW REPORTER. Articles on women in prison, women lawyers, book reviews and case summaries. Published bimonthly, $12. 119 Fifth Ave., New York, New York. CHANGE: A WORKING WOMAN'S NEWSPAPER. Articles in a recent issue covered International Women's Day, an oppressive radio station and an employe's adviser. Published eight to ten times a year, $2. 968 Valencia St., San Francisco, Calif., 94110. THE FEMINIST VOICE. A recent issue contained articles on women and their bodies, a lesson in plumbing and a news column. Published monthly, $3. Box 11144, 227 E. Ontario, Chicago, 111. 60611. WOMANKIND. Articles on childbirth, women in health and medicine, legal rights and fix-it. Published monthly, $4. Chicago Women's Liberation Union, 852 W. Belmont, Chicago, 111.,60611. WOMEN'S PRESS. Articles in a recent issue were on the Myth of Feminity, women and health, women and politics and prostitution. Published monthly, $3. 119 E. Broadway #210, Eugene, Ore., 97401. EQUAL PAY ACT DOES PAY It has often been reported that the feminist movement was once treated as a major joke in the boradrooms of corporate America. The time for "hilarity" has passed and companies across the country are finding that they're going to have to come to grips quickly with demands for women's equality on pain of substantial financial penalties. The prime mover behind this acceleration is the federal government. Since the enactment of the Equal Pay Act in 1963 (an amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938), almost $42 million in underpayments have been found owing to 102,000 employees—mostly women. (The act, although excluding administrative, professional and executive employees, requires that men and women receive equal pay for equal work. Under the act, the Labor Department or individuals can file court suits to seek redress for alleged pay discriminations.) One of the largest cases under the act involved Wheaton Glass Company in Millville, N.J., which has paid more than $901,000 in back salaries and interest to women employees. The case was brought to court by the Labor Department when the women claimed they'd been paid less than men for similar work. Last February the Labor Department won a judgement in U.S. District Court against Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company. The company was penalized $450,000 in back pay and interest to women employees found eligible under the Equal Pay Act. The most recent sex-discrimination cases have resulted in court decisions which have assessed the companies involved back pay plus 6 percent interest. Starting with the next issue the Broadside will publish paid advertisements. Business ads will be sold by page percentage, the smallest being 1/9 th for $5.00. Help wanted ads will also be accepted at $2.00 per five lines. For more information contact Geny McConnell at 481-3601. NOW members wishing to join the Broadside business staff should call Susan Hedding. Did you know that in the Dewey Decimal Sys- tern of book classifi cations " Women" are in the same division with "Gypsies, Nomads, and Outcasts" ? Productive Solution To Anger For the past nine weeks, ten Houston NOW members have participated in an experimental radical therapy group. Dr. Marlyne Kilbey, experimental psychologist, conducted the meetings which focused on channeling hostility into productive, goal setting behavior. Group members were heterogeneous in terms of employment, education and marital status. However each member shared the common goal of wanting to direct her anger toward accomplishing specific goals. Many problems of group members centered around employment and past or present marriages. Participants were very honest in expressing personal fears and disappointments as well as successes, and often became quite blunt in attempting to help another member work through her problems. Dr. Kilbey did not present herself as a problem solver, but only as another group member with her own concerns. She allowed each member to work out individual solutions with the help of the group. There were few lapses in conversation as group members competed to bring their thoughts and ideas before the group. Meetings that were originally planned to last two hours spilled into four. Several men were allowed to attend the final sessions. Each expressed opinions which were clarified only after lengthy and often heated debates by the group. The group culminated with a final session lasting an entire weekend, during which time the group participated in round-the-clock discussion. Group members stated they found the sessions stimulating, enlightening, useful and enjoyable. One member felt long hours of expensive individual therapy did not have the effect of the past nine weeks of radical therapy in helping reach a difficult decision. Those interested in participating in a second radical therapy group should contact Helen Copitka, educational psychologist, who will lead the group. For more information call Helen, 681-3482.