Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972
Page 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972 - Page 2. September 1972. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2809/show/2800.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1972). Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2809/show/2800

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972 - Page 2, September 1972, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2809/show/2800.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 5, September 1972
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date September 1972
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_085b.jpg
Transcript Page 2 BROADSIDE September 1972 SIMULTANEOUS DISCHARGE OF ALL THE GUNS ON ONE SIDE OF A WARSHIP . . . ANY STRONG OR COMPREHENSIVE ATTACK, AS BY CRITICISM ... A SONG, CHIEFLY IN I6TH- AND 17TH-CENTURY ENGLAND, WRITTEN.ON A TOPICAL SUBJECT, PRINTED ON BROADSIDES, AND SUNG IN PUBLIC . . . , BY A PROFESSIONAL BALLADEER . THE RANDOM HOUSE DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, UNABRIDGED EDITION Comment As a new member of NOW, I find that I have two conflicting feelings about becoming a feminist. On one hand, I feel very good about working for me; on the other, I am becoming more than a little paranoid. I had gone to the first orientation meeting feeling I was drowning -- the waves were lapping against my nose. Raising a daughter, trying to keep a balanced budget, running errands, and coping with a fulltime job has given me plenty of exposure to the deeply ingrained attitude women should not want to make it in the world without the "protection" of some man -- any man -- and they certainly shouldn't enjoy it! My independence was hard-won and a long time coming for me. I felt so alone because I had chosen a way of life that is still considered unnatural and unusual. At NOW meetings I have met so many women, from Ph.D.'s to fulltime housewives, who feel the same way I do, and I don't feel so eccentric or so alone anymore. There is always the chance I will never want to marry again, but regardless, I want to have the best life for myself and my daughter that I can possibly provide. NOW has shown me that women simply do not have to accept attitudes and practices which tend to rob them of equal pay for equal work, equal opportunity for credit, and ownership of their own bodies. I am so glad to be in the Movement. I have never been a "joiner." Garden clubs and card parties have never appealed to me at all. I once joined a sorority when I was in college, but was so inactive that they elected me to a minor office just so I would show up for the meetings. NOW is something different. It isn't a social club, although you find good society there; and it isn't one of those busy-work clubs for women to get together on any excuse to combat loneliness. I feel NOW is a civil rights group in the truest sense with serious intentions and necessary goals, and I certainly don't feel like I am wasting my time. As for paranoia, well ... I have found a large, yellow streak of it lengthwise down my back. As ashamed as I am, I must confess to it. I have found it difficult to mention to some of my acquaintances that I am now a card-carrying feminist. Reactions have ranged from, "Really? When do they meet?" to "Come on, now... you don't think you're as good as a man, do you?" Could I lose my job? Will any man ever want to date me? Will my friends shun me, my daughter be teased at school? Will I be mentioned by my relatives in whispers? Is it, or is it not, worse than body odor? So here I am bucking the system, and I'm also looking over my shoulder. I hope these fantasies will fade with time and experience in the Movement. I have already found that it isn't so much the men who are up tight about women's liberation, as it is the "Doris Days". You know the kind I mean. They smirk and say, "Well, of course, I'm happily married, so I don't feel discriminated against." I wonder what they plan to do if they are widowed or divorced and need to get credit in their own names, or jobs. It can happen to any woman, and it happens every day. I have heard two women come right out and call the movement "crap", so I think that the idea of freedom and its accompanying responsibility frightens some women very much. We have all been carefully taught that we must have the approval of men, that it's no wonder I look over my shoulder. We should all have chronic neck strain by now. I am not so sure, though, that men -- a general term if there ever was one -- will not approve. It depends on the man and how secure he is in his masculinity. I haven't heard very much vocal opposition from men; in fact, I've heard a few "Good for you's". and l'm certain the number will grow. H BROADSIDE STAFF EDITOR: ART DIRECTOR; CONTRIBUTORS: Susan Hedding Geny McConnell Parrish Hirasaki Barbara Lane Farley Linda Cryer Yolanda Garza NOW OFFICERS PRESIDENT: Parrish Hirasaki 333-2297 VICE PRESIDENT: Peggy Hall 528-3424 SECRETARY: Muncy McKinney 944-5534 TREASURER: Ann McClung 488-0148 TASK FORCES AND COORDINATORS BROADSIDE: CREDIT: EDUCATION: EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY: FUND RAISING: MEMBERSHIP & ORIENTATION: POLITICS & LOBBYING: REPRODUCTION* ITS CONTROL: WOMEN IN POVERTY: Susan Hedding 667-5543 Susan Butler 664-9534 Peggy Hall 528-3424 Parrish Hirasaki 333-2297 Marlyne Kilbey 664-4121 Geny McConnel 481-3601 Helen Cassidy 748-5369 Jeanne Necaise 665-3287 Peggy Hall 528-3424 National Organization for Women P.O. Box 58202 Houston, Texas 77058 If you have a question about Houston NOW or any aspect of women's rights, call one ot the following numbers: A.M. P.M. 333-3270 333-3270 748-5369 748-5369 333-2297 legislation to Watch MINIMUM WAGE. Senate passed bill extending coverage to domestics and increasing wage to $2.20. Bill to go to conference. House bill does not include domestics. CHILD CARE. Senate passed modified version to meet Nixon's objections. House has not acted. WELFARE. HR1 passed House. Considered by Senate Finance Committee. Opposed by National Welfare Rights Organization.