Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Broadside, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1977
Page 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Broadside, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1977 - Page 3. December 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2788/show/2782.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1977). Broadside, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1977 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2788/show/2782

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1977 - Page 3, December 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2788/show/2782.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Broadside, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1977
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date December 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_032c.jpg
Transcript THE NATIONAL WOMEN'S CONFERENCE (A VIEW FROM THE FLOOR) I showed up at 7 a.m. Saturday for duty as a microphone monitor at the National Women's Conference. Bleary-eyed, I stood in line with the rest of the volunteers to receive my red tee-sheet bearing the legend, "Convention Aide." I put it on and immediately felt like a fruit drink. We had been briefed earlier about our duties. As representatives of the I.W.Y. Commission appointed by the feds, we were to show no political stance at all during the meeting. No buttons, no signs, no street gestures. Above all, no show of approval or disapproval of either the issues or the delegates. I though it might be difficult. It was a piece of cake. Since the opening session was all pomp and circumstance, with no speakers from the floor, the mike monitors were pressed into security duty. Several of us were stationed in front of the stage. Our duties consisted mainly of trying to keep the aisles clear and the media at bay. After the keynote address, the media rushed the stage. I found myself linked up in an arm-chain of redshirts trying to keep them from climbing on the stage. The Secret Service guys were behind the Thin Red Line. I had earlier half-heartedly thought about trying to hustle one of the Secret Service guys who resembled Kurt Vonnegut, but I experienced the female equivalent of an inability to achieve an erection. (We need a term for this, gang. Get to work on it.) Our real work began with the second session. We took our places at the mikes. We had a series of colored placards to hold up to get the Chair's attention. Each color was significant: Blue for a pro speech; Green for a con speech; Orange for an amendment or substitute motion; Yellow for a point of order or personal privilege; White for calling the question; and Red for HELP! As soon as business got underway, it became apparent that a great number of delegates knew less about parliamentary procedures than the average tamale.