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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 11. October 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2772.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2772

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 11, October 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2772.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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File Name femin_201109_532j.jpg
Transcript fREE pREqNANCy TESTiNq & iNfORIMATJON 868-4485 r last year for every 30C earned by a woman business owner an other business owner made $100. we're here to make a difference NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS 2000 P St., NW Washington, DC 20036 (202) 338-8966 For Houston Chapter Information Call 524-8284 Proof, Not Promises Bette Graham White has over the years proved to be a leader with competence, compassion and considerable intellect. She is the only mayoral candidate with a solidly progressive record, both as an elected official and as a concerned citizen. Ask your friends. You'll be surprised how many want Bette Graham White as Houston's next Mayor. Bette for Mayor Paid for by the Bette Graham White for Mayor Campaign P.O. Box 66315, Houston, Texas 77006, Louise Alexander, treasurer. PAGE 10 OCTOBER 1977 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH MAYOR RACE con't. from p. 9 McConn is a former city council member who did not seek re-election for a third term in 1975 because financial problems had hit home building business during the recession. The Ginther people said his firm is bankrupt, so McConn is not "fiscally responsible." McConn countered that although he was in debt, he will repay it all, and at least he had never taken formal bankruptcy as Ginther once did. "If you get in trouble as mayor of Houston, you're, hopefully, not going to be able to declare bankruptcy," McConn said. McConn and Ginther have fought each other hard, sparring over the minorities and moderate to liberal part of the spectrum which Briscoe has trouble attracting. They battled to a draw over the blacks. The Harris County Council of Organizations split and endorsed no one formally. Vice president Zollie Scales Jr. charged that Ginther supporters tried to buy his support with an expensive, new car. The Forward Times jumped on McConn's city council record. Then the Black Organization for Leadership Development endorsed McConn, while the black Baptist ministers gave the nod to Ginther. McConn has more experience in city government than any of his opponents and doesn't seem as much the creature of the slick media manipulators as Ginther. He appears honest and decent, if not brilliantly creative. Some liberals feel he may not be great, but he has a much better chance of knocking off Briscoe in a run-off than Ginther, because Briscoe could harp on Ginther's inexperience. McConn is the number two spender in the race (he even put an ad in Time). Insiders expect his effort to cost at least $300,000. Dick Gottlieb is the Hubert Humphrey of Houston politics. He came close once, in 1973 a- gainst Hofheinz, and is still running. This is his third race, and no one doubts him when he says, "I don't know of anyone in your city who wants to be mayor more than I do." Like Hubie, Gottlieb, a former city council member and television personality, has kept his sense of humor, opening the League of Women Voters' forum with "I'm going to do this thing until I do it right." He appeals to the same sort of voter as Briscoe, basically conservative, but has little big time support due to his track record. Gottlieb will probably spend less than $10,000 but is almost assured of fourth place because of his name recognition. Gottlieb would not retain a women's advocate if elected. Bette Graham White and the Seven Dwarfs On the surface, Bette Graham White seems to have political savvy. She was co-ordinator of volunteers for Hofheinz in 1975 and has worked in several winning campaigns. Her husband is big in public relations, and she says she will spend between $30,000 and $50,000. But her political involvement has been superficial, many say. And she almost lost her race foT community development commissioner for Montrose and the Fourth Ward to gay activist Pokey Anderson, who ran as a write-in. At a gathering to honor Montrose's liberal state Rep. Ron Waters, she was caught completely off guard by his endorsement of Ginther. She reportedly lost her cool and stormed out. There is nothing wrong with being upset by not getting an endorsement, but not knowing what was coming suggests she is still somewhat of a novice. White sounds very liberal and progressive, but one wonders what she has in mind when she talks of "bringing the churches into the administration of the city." Much of her support comes from her association with charismatic Christians. She would enhance the power of the women's advocate, she says, and would create others for groups such as children. And perhaps a sizeable vote for her would show that many agree with White "it's about time" Houston had women in high office. The other seven hopefuls are just that-hopefuls. God told Arthur E. Abrego to seek the mayor's post, or so he says. The 29-year-old X-ray technician borrowed part of the $1,250 filing fee on his add-cash checking account. "If I can get some more donations, I'll spend $500," he said of his uphill battle. As for the women's advocate, "her duties-I didn't really understand them." He says, nonetheless, he would create three women's advocates- one each for blacks, Chicanas and whites. Ovide Duncantell is the only black in the contest and may draw the most of the remaining seven candidates. He says his pitch will cost less than $5,000. A long-time political gadfly and former aide to County Commissioner Tom Bass, he may not be far off when he says the police get away with what they do because of the unholy alliance of the Chamber of Commerce, the 100 Club and the Houston Police Association. He supports the women's advocate. Manuel Velasco is the other^ Mexican-American in the race One-upping Briscoe, whose roots go back to Stephen F. Austin's Fort Bend County colony, Velasco brags that his family has been here "since the Treaty of Velasco, when Texas became Texas." Asked about the women's advocate, he said, "As mayor, I will be advocating for all the people." But the middle-aged ethnic stands little chance with what an aide said is a war chest of less than $5,000. "If you could control the police, you'd have a lot less crime," socialist worker Diane Sarge said. The corporate aristocracy is the cause of most of our problems, she claims. Sarge would expand the job of women's advocate and create similar positions for others. Less than $5,000 will be spent on her campaign and that of two other socialist worker candidates, she said. Allen Vogel claims the endorsement of the Libertarian party (there are no official party candidates, since the city charter mandates non-partisan election). He is the logical extension of the theory of government that less is more and believes, therefore, a women's advocate would be superfluous in his administration. "However, I'm not sure it wouldn't be necessary in another administration." Vogel says he'll spend less than $2,500. Dana McNatt enjoys the support of the Nazi party. Asked if women would have a larger role than present in his regime, he seemed startled and then said, yes, they would. "So many good things have been said about women throughout history-behind every good man there's a woman. That sort of thing," he said, adding there were many high ranking women in Nazi Germany, "... I can't remember any, but. . ." Larry Robinson rounds out the list. The most amazing thing about this successful young businessman is thathe will spend, according to campaign manager Andy Wooten, $50,000 on the lost cause. Of the women's advocate, he believes "the position is warranted but on a smaller pay scale." MARTINA STAPLES attorney (j< counselor at law divorce, child custodu, Qy< general practice 609 fannin suite 524 houston, texas 77002 713/236-0225 CARL RENTZ ^xaminq - (DLd crf-dvzxtUiny cn-ntiauti. - cftloitalcjia 2404 Hopkins Fairview & Montrose