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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 8. October 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2770.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2770

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 8, October 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2770.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_532h.jpg
Transcript Issues and Answers Views on board politics A school board trustee holds a curious position, somehow wrapped in a flag, with images of apple pie and Mother. It is an almost universally unpaid political office but holds great power. That power stems from the fact that many of the issues school boards deal with closely touch people's lives. There have always been those who see some of those issues- desegregation, racism and sexism, in particular-as isolated sociopolitical matters to be dealt with outside the schools. But I feel they are basic to the education of the individual. The child who is dealt with stereo typically, who is put into or kept out of certain courses or counselled toward or away from certain goals because of his or her sex or race is clearly being short-changed. In the 1960's the big issue was desegregation. Now we have the magnet schools, which are really fine, but have they done much for desegregation? The question of accepting federal aid sparked bitter debate a- bout "losing local control" which really meant "they will make us integrate our schools." Now, HISD gets more than $5 million a year from the federal government. Sex discrimination wasn't dealt with at all during my tenure. No consciousness was raised and there were no laws to use as leverage. Ironically, the school board is the one elected position that the public has always regarded as proper for women. After all, it has to do with children, doesn't it? The successful candidate will find out he or she has a choice of how to function once on the board. A board member can become a "yes person" to the administration or one who takes direction from stronger members. The responsible member, however, will study the unendingly fascinating, many-faceted operation of the public schools, ask lots of questions and find ways to initiate and pursue matters so as to avoid violating tne line of demarcation between board and administration. This person will soon learn the best way to get the public's attention on an issue is to speak of it in financial terms, not in terms of morality and law. Board members have the power to make changes. Voters must be careful about whom they give that power to and then see that they use it properly. G.B. Gertrude Barnstone was a member of the Houston Independent School Board from 1964-69. Wright's sentiments are similar, but she cautions that, "I wouldn't want a person to teach homosexuality in the classroom—and I would not want them to teach religion either." Morris is "not in favor of witch hunts," but doesn't see any advantages in keeping teachers with "open tendencies." Wedgeworth agrees with other candidates of Dis trict 1 that "It's their business- their private life," but adds, "I personally would not want them teaching children." Navarro was reluctant to be specific, and only stated that we should surround our children with "emotionally balanced, physiologically stable, and emotionally secure adults that can be a guiding light and inspiration." School board trustee candidates in the fifth district are Craig Roberts, Andrew Byrd, Bert Bares. William Pisciella, Betty Blue Alexander, Geneva Kirk Brooks, and Asberry Butler. 1. Coed Phys-Ed All candidates are in favor of expanded athletic programs for girls, with the exception of Byrd, who refused to comment. Brooks feels, however, that girls do not have enough stamina for some activities. Butler stands on his pre- vious school board record with re- gard to the issue of sex discrimination in education. Pisciella adds that discrimination in tracking girls academically into unproductive fields must not go unchallenged. Roberts also points out that "we need to ensure that HISD meets the spirit as well as the letter of the law." 2. Magnet Schools All candidates, except Brooks, feel that the magnet school concept must be expanded. Pisciella, noting that 102 HISD schools are totally segregated, feels that the magnet approach to integration needs to be reviewed by a special committee. 3. Sexist Texts Again Byrd declined to comment. All other candidates report that they would review and make recommendations on any materials passed to them. Alexander and Bares went a step further. Alexander says she would try to ensure that the committee of review for materials used in the schools would have a full understanding of the issues at hand. Bares offered to sign a written pledge that he would work for an immediate review of all such materials or texts. 4.Migrant Children Brooks alone is opposed to free tuition for children of migrants or aliens, on the grounds that it would encourage an increase in the flow of illegal aliens into the school sys- |Barbara Bogue and Ellen Berman are free-lance writers. Janet Beals i a co-editor of the Harrisburg (Pennsylvania) Area Women's News. tern. Alexander stated flatly that the issue is in the courts, and the schools will have to abide by that decision. Roberts, Bares, Pisciella and Butler all feel that no child should be denied education. "We can't throw the kids out," admonishes Roberts. Pisciella noted that virtually all undocumented workers are paying for the educational system already, either through taxes or indirectly through rent. Byrd adds that he would judge each case on its merits. 5. Women Administrators All candidates are in favor of increasing the numbers of women at administrative levels. Pisciella has already been involved in affirmative action on this issue in the Houston Teachers Association. Bares brought up the companion issue of poorly paid support personnel in HISD, a largely female group, for which he would also seek higher wages. Roberts affirms. "I know there are lots of qualified women out there," and guarantees that job openings will be announced publicly. Sex Education All candidates expressed the o- pinion that the schools must offer sex education, as many children are not getting it at home. Pisciella feels, in addition, that it should be broadened to discuss attitudes towards sexual stereotypes. 7. Gay Teachers While a majority of candidates in this district feel that a person's private life is their own business, only Pisciella heartily denounced the Supreme Court's recent decision to uphold the firing of a gay teacher. He also affirms his full support of gay rights, feeling that it is an important issue. Brooks, on the other hand, says, "I do not believe that anybody who has a perverted or deviant handicap should be in a situation where they could be models for children. When homosexuals have to flaunt it, they can go into other businesses." Bares, Alexander, Butler, and Roberts share the opinion that if gay teachers do not indulge in improper conduct with children, they should be left alone. Bares notes, "Anyone who ■ doesn't flagrantly abuse the law should not be bothered." Alexander "would not want anyone's civil rights infringed upon," but if a case of abuse was proven, she would recommend removal. Roberts is firm about e- valuating teachers on classroom performance alone, though he too would suspend a teacher (via proper procedures) who indulged in sexual abuse. Butler, fearful of witch hunts, again would evaluate on classroom behavior. Byrd feels he cannot make a comment on this question. Candidates for District VI are Maxine Davis, Lou Harris, Theda Hoyt, and Howard Humphreys. 1. Coed Phys-Ed The candidates differed widely in their views on Title IX enforcement and sex-integrated physical education classes. Davis favors the classes, and would like to see a broader program, including more intramural activities. Along the THE FIFTH ANNUAL OCT. 30,1977 2AM □houstonh moonlight BICYCLEirS RambleEJ A CASUAL TWO HOUR FUH AND RECREATIONAL BICYCLE RIOE REGISTRATION OREN 11PM SAT. OCT. 29 HERMANN PARK ZOO. FEf: S1.00 - REFRESHMENTS - INFO: 497 0981, 528-7109 T-shlrts and tickets available at Daniel Boone Cycles, 5318 Crawford, and area bicycle shops. Ting Tfehs Dishes (713) 9804667 iajc ars n&itfO) fl like fhs phoenix 8 from hhs ashes m or our mohhsrs ft rbrqortsirt cirsams M *t-___L« uuomsn- *t riss j' fl anal fl forqsf fl no mors J| w fl fi_ v ^__ •Mia v *'^H ' ccgccccccccggcct few a calender for T3P8 $5 rims .85 1 postal texans add .25 tax EnctaMd Is o ch*ck fi Nam "hAjelus'a ->1 eafeHcJa- fa-1978 fafteards «*X> siuss aj_ ciaflasfexas 7520<r dtw »»■!■ »rlf»t _B HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH OCTOBER 1977 PAGE 7