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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
Page 7
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 7. October 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 10, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2769.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2769

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 7, October 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 10, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2769.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_532g.jpg
Transcript 22 candidates for 4 seats k ft I LOMI BODY WORK GESTALT AWARENESS MASSAGE CLASSES YOGA CLASSES IN BODY AWARENESS ANN LASAT E R 5 2 3 0 3 6 8 1 ft f ir Southern Broadcasting Company KULF&KYND Radio has immediate openings and is now interviewing for the following positions: receptionist salesperson computer operator bookkeeping asst. newsperson Apply by calling Bill Bosse at 654-7900. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Housing Discri mination Is Illegal HISD board race By Janet Beals, Ellen Berman and Barbara Bogue Candidates for District I are Edward Sanchez, Mary Parker, Letha Marion Reynolds, Ginia Wray Wright, Shirley Wedgeworth, Ray A. Morrison and Rev. Arturo Navarro. 1. Coed Phys-Ed Reactions to Title IX and coed P.E. classes in Houston schools were mixed. While Morrison prefers sex-segregation in physical education classes, most other candidates lean toward mixed classes. Both Parker and Navarro approve of coed classes if separate dressing rooms are maintained, while Reynolds sees them as "not necessary, but not objectionable." Wright and Wedgeworth agree that the court rulings should be followed by the district, and Wedgeworth adds his support of coed classes. Navarro remarks that "the situation is challenging for all children as individuals/' Sanchez believes that HISD is doing its part in enforcement, and that the kids are "doing OK" with coed classes. 2. Magnet Schools Almost all candidates in this district spoke positively of the magnet school system. Navarro, the exception, feels that the program has been over-sold and is a distraction from the real problem of desegregation. Reynolds and Wedgeworth, both of whom worked in the early stages of magnet school development, would like to see the program expanded. Parker and Wright also favor an increase in the number of schools, and Wright adds her wish for more parent education about specific programs. Morrison, Wedgeworth and Sanchez agree that the system has been successful in helping desegregation. Sanchez calls it "the best school system so far"—but Morrison wants to see more vocational schools. 3. Sexist Texts Reactions differed on the treatment of sexist materials in the classroom. Four candidates mentioned specific action they would take, while a fifth, Navarro, said simply that he wants no stereotypes perpetuated in the classroom. Of the four, Wedgeworth would personally review any questionable text, while Wright and Morrison would do their best to remove sexist material. Parker, believing that equal time should be given to all ideas, would bring the offending material to the attention of the board with the hopes of enacting a policy. Reynolds disapproves of censorship, but believes that a teacher's good judgment can balance and influence the contents of a text. Sanchez feels that a decision of this nature should be left to the state committee that handles these matters. 4. Migrant Children Three candidates,Wright,Wedgeworth and Sanchez, answered the question of migrant or alien children attendingHISD schools tuition- free with a firm "no." Wedgeworth hedged his negative response with On Nov. 8, voters in Houston Independent School Districts 1, 5, 6, and 7 will go to the polls to select four new trustees to the HISD board. The board presides over an operation with a current budget of $379 million and 15,500 employees. The school board in Houston is big business. A board trustee must be involved in the management of the district's funds, the selection of architects and contractors for new schools, and understand bidding procedures. Although the complex political maneuvering and legal battle over the breakaway Westheimer Independent School District has grabbed most of the headlines, there are other issues of equal importance facing the board. These include continued efforts toward desegregation through the magnet schools system, progress toward a fully bilingual system and measures to erase sexism both in the classroom and within the ranks of employees. With no incumbents among the 22 candidates and scant public debate on these and other school issues, voters may find the following Breakthrough poll helpful in choosing among the candidates for this political office. Here are the questions and the candidates' responses, noted by districts and order of filing. i 2 3 4 How do you feel about girls and boys participating in co-ed physical education classes, as required by Title IX? Do you feel that the magnet school system has helped to desegregate the HISD schools? If a teacher or parent brought sexist texts or teaching materials to your attention, what would you do about it? Do you think that the children of Mexican-American migrants and/or aliens should attend HISD schools tuition-free? What would you as a new board member do to bring more women into upper administration in HISD? Do you think sex education belongs in schools? In light of the recent Supreme Court decision upholding the firing of a gay teacher, how would you handle a similar situation in HISD? an exception in the case of possible federal or state financing. Reynolds also responded in the negative, saying that the district cannot afford tuition for these non-taxpayers, and that state law must be obeyed. Parker agrees that finances are a problem, but argues that aliens do pay taxes indirectly. Her first concern is for the children, calling it "false economy" not to educate them. Navarro agrees that no child should be denied an education, and sees the issue as a judicial problem. 5. Women Administrators Only two candidates, Reynolds and Navarro, said they would seek out competent female applicants for upper level administrative jobs, the latter adding that he would "work for balance in top positions." The other five candidates are together in their belief that promotion should be based strictly on qualifications. Sanchez, noting the high percentage of women already in the school system, adds that he'd have to do some research on the problem, while Wedgeworth feels that "we are not that far off in women administrators." Morrison does not feel that promotion is the job of the school board to begin with. 6. Sex Education All candidates but Sanchez approve of some form of sex education in the schools. Sanchez feels that the subject belongs at home, but is willing to cooperate if parents have other views. Parker approves of parenting classes and would like to see parents informed about the contents of the classes; but she disapproves of the teaching methods used. Reynolds is in favor of being open and early about sex education, and would also like better parent awareness of the schools' role. She feels we must decide, "Who will conduct sex education in the schools, the students or the teachers?" Wright sees sex education as a necessary subject, to be taught by a "responsible person" as early as sixth grade. She emphasized that sex education meant "hygiene, body development, etc. -not intercourse!" Wedgeworth adds that because of the failure of church and home to do the teaching in this area, the schools must. Morrison approves, if sexually segregated classes are taught by a person of the same sex. Navarro believes very young children are not ready, and that classes should begin with 11- to 12-year-olds. 7. Gay Teachers Onlyone candidate, Sanchez, expressed the opinion that he would unequivocally fire a homosexual teacher. "I don't want kids around those kind of people," he says. Three candidates, Reynolds, Parker and Wright, feel that a teacher's off-duty life is his or her own business, and would not fire a gay teacher unless other factors intervened, such as classroom performance or specific complaints from parents. Parker comments, "I do not feel it is my responsibility to legislate morality." Reynolds agrees, and adds, "In my 39 years with the school system, I have never known any homosexuals to be fired for that reason alone, and I don't see any reason to start now." PAGE 6 OCTOBER 1977 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH