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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 3. October 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 10, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2765.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1977). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2765

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977 - Page 3, October 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 10, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2779/show/2765.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 2, No. 9, October 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_532c.jpg
Transcript Editorials Voters'guide "Endorsements are becoming less and less effective. The parties are crumbling and candidates are going directly through the media to the public," in the opinion of political analyst John Staples. Switch on your TV. Noble Ginther stares you straight in the eye as he says "I'm not a politician. I'm a businessman. I don't have to answer to anyone." Frank Briscoe surrounds himself with Houston citizens who trust him—a white, middle-aged male, an elderly black female, and a young chicano. Jim McConn tells us he's a builder and promises to build Houston. Bette Graham White simply wants you to vote for "Bette." Well, it worked for Jimmy. Like Uncle Sam, the candidates want you. They want your vote and they will use all the resources of the media to get it: three-colored billboards, slick brochures, flashy montages, jacket-over-the-shoulder shots, outside-the-factory-gate interviews, family portraits in the Memorial area backyard with trees and dogs. As a barometer of how endorsements are faring, the Harris County Council of Organizations failed to endorse a mayoral candidate this year—the first time in almost 30 years. In fact, they fought about it. At their recent endorsement meeting, supporters of Ginther and Mc Conn actually came to blows. "The black vote is being sold again," observes George Nelson, the widely-respected Houstonian who founded the HCCO in his downtown barber shop back in 1949. "We formed this group in the black community to bind ourselves together. Now it has lost its effectiveness." In a municipal non-partisan election, voters have few guidelines. They are left essentially with the media image of the candidates. To this limitation must be added the fact that in a city the size of Houston, it takes an enormous amount of money to run a citywide campaign. Anyone can run, but the average citizen has little effect on who the front runners will be. That is determined by big money interests. For the voter to make an intelligent, informed decision on the basis of media hype and lavish campaign expenditures seems almost impossible. But not quite. There is one organization that can help-the League of Women Voters. The League is a "non-partisan organization working to promote political responsibility through informed and active participation of all citizens in their government. The League of Women Voters does not support or oppose any political party or candidate." The League has always attacked the issues. Its first program in 1920 addressed child welfare, education, inflation and women in gainful occupations. It will spend a million dollars this year on the fight for passage of the E.R.A. In Houston, the League has printed and distributed thousands of Voters' Keys and Voters' Guides. They publish information on candidates and their positions, provide forums for debate and hold intensive voter registration drives. You still have to do your homework. You have to decide which candidates and which issues you will support. The League will not endorse anyone. But they will provide you with more concrete and impartial information on candidates than any other source. Breakthrough endorses the League of Women Voters and their commitment to a more informed electorate. This is the only endorsement we will be making for this election. oreakttirougt- Vol II, no. 9 STAFF - THIS ISSUE Ailene English, Nancy Landau, Tree Johnson, Jane Little, Mary Jane White Pat Bohan, Charley Kubricht Judy Hopkinson, Lana Lalor, Lynne Mutchler Sam E.J. Akers, Carol Bartholdi, Janet Beals, Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Cheryl Knott Janet Beals, Janice Blue, Judy Hopkinson, Lana Lalor Sam E.J. Akers, Janice Blue, Jim Caldwell, Marsha Goff, Wm Lelor, Beth Parker, Suzanne Paul, Betsey Siegel, Jim Youngmeyer Sam E.J. Akers, Janet Beals, Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Melissa Nobel, Robert Phifer, Johanna Smith Neal Barrett, Ruth Barrett Janet Beals, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Judy Hopkinson Janet Beals, Pat Bohan, Barbara Lejeune, Jeannine Klein, Cheryl Knott EDITORIAL BOARD Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Deborah Diamond Hicks, Marilyn Jones, Nancy Landau Houston Breakthrough is published monthly (with the exception of the July- August and December-January issues) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004. P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions $5 per year, newstand 50# per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60201. PAGE 2 OCTOBER 1977 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Advertising Art Circulation Copy Editors Office Photographers Production Promotion Proofreading Typesetting The IWY National AVomen's Conference is the largest convocation of women in this country and the first such meeting ever to be funded by the U.S. government. It is scheduled for November 18-21 in Houston. Conference goals include recognizing women's contributions to the country's development, studying the role of women in the economic, social, cultural and political arenas, assessing the participation of women in strengthening world peace, identifying barriers that prevent women from participating fully and equally in all areas of national life, developing recommendations for. removing those barriers, and providing a forum for all women to celebrate their past efforts and to make plans for the future. WHERE? The plenary sessions will be in the Coliseum, 810 Bagby. The Albert Thomas Convention Center, 612 Smith, will house exhibits, lectures, films, and other activities of special interest to nondelegates. WHATSHAPPEMNG? Rally A welcoming rally for women's rights supporters attending the conference will be held at 4 p.m. Friday on the steps of City Hall. The rally's purposes are: to welcome conference participants to Houston, to commemorate the memory of Dr. Alice Paul, the author of the ERA, and to show support for equal rights for women. Film Festival Films will show continuously during the conference in the West Hall of the convention center. Works screened will include "Salt of the Earth," "Amelia Earhart," "How We Won the Vote," and "Union Maids." More than 20 different films will be shown. Seneca Falls South Seneca Falls South will be the public assembly area occupying a- bout half of East Hall at the Albert Thomas Convention Center. Exhibits of women's businesses and organizations will occupy the other half of the hall. This area is brightly lit, about 180 feet square with 35-foot ceilings. It will be a space where conference-goers can relax and enjoy, listen, learn, celebrate, IW Y Update As a prelude to this historic conference, 56 diverse and dramatic women's meetings, one in each state and territory, were held. A- merican women attending these meetings voted on resolutions and elected delegates to send to the conference. Resolutions came from a wide range of workshops on such topics as homemaker rights, child care, employment, education, teenage pregnancy, the ERA, credit, older women, female offenders, and minority women. Public Law 94-167 named the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year (IWY) sponsor for the state meetings and the national conference. Each state shares in the $5 million provided by Congress for the meeting series. Recommendations and a final report on the conference will be submitted to the President and Congress in March 1978. WHO CAN ATTEND? The delegates to the conference have been chosen already, but interested visitors and spectators can participate in the many special activities and observe the plenary sessions where resolutions and recommendations will be decided. WHO CAN HELP? If you have already volunteered with the local IWY office, 515 Rusk, you will be getting specific job assignments in the next two weeks. If you would like to volunteer, call the IWY office at 226-5108. And, see page 11 to volunteer for work at Breakthrough. (We'll be publishing daily conference news issues.) WHEN? While registration opens at noon on Friday, November 18, at the convention center, most of the activities are scheduled for Saturday and Sunday when most women can participate. Simply register when you arrive at the convention Registration fee is $5, and there is .no pre-registration. AMERICAN WOMEN ON THE MOVE F«M Msto?sl Wbmans Car$m»nc& / Sponsors i by 71*/ Un* <i :-/,««« 5 Gjnyrss&jon tan tr*.i Observanceo? INTERNATIONAL WOMENS YEAR HOUSTON, TEXAS / NOV. 1821,1977 Dottie Erwin Plenary Session ventilate, and appreciate. Staged The plenary session opens at 9 and spontaneous performances will a.m. on Saturday, November 19, feature vocalists, instrumentalists, with speeches by Bella Abzug, sP°rts> dance> Poetry, speakers and Liz Carpenter, and Mayor Fred soapbox oratory. Information Hofheinz. After a lunch break, booths> including a job placement voting will begin at 2 p.m. on the center> wm also be in the area- Plan of Action, with a dinner break, and continue from 8:30 p.m. until around 11:30 p.m. On Sunday, November 20, an international hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. The plenary session resumes at 1 p.m. and adjourns at 5 p.m. for an evening of entertainment. Monday's plenary session will open at 9 a.m. and adjourn at 12:30 p.m. Distinguished Women Distinguished women in government will give hour-long lectures all day Saturday and Sunday. Some 35 women, including Sarah Weddington, Eleanor Holmes Norton, and Midge Costanza, will give talks in three small meeting rooms (90 seats each) at the convention center. Interfaith Worship An int erf ait h worship experience is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday, November 20, at the Rothko Chapel, 3900 Yupon at Sul Ross. The services will incorporate the "I" and "You" becoming "We" through the reconciliation of women and their differences. Free bus service will be provided from the conference area to the chapel. No workshops per se are scheduled. Instead, success story discussions, skills clinics, a job placement counseling service, special cultural and arts events, and evening entertainment are in the works. The November issue of Breakthrough will carry complete schedule information and special features on conference activities. Cover photo by JIM YOUNGMEYER and graphics by PAT BOHAN.