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The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991
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The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991 - Page 5. December 1991. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2762/show/2753.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1991). The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2762/show/2753

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991 - Page 5, December 1991, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2762/show/2753.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991
Publisher Womynspace
Date December 1991
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .W35
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3634790~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Note On some pages, comic strips have been digitally obscured to protect owner's copyright.
Item Description
Title Page 5
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_459e.jpg
Transcript Film Continued from previous page Louise's lover, Jimmy (Michael Madsen), follows her across state lines. A sweet guy, though none too steady, Jimmy loves Louise but has a mighty hard time saying so. He runs away from commitment until Louise runs away from home. When he shows up in Oklahoma City, he has a shiny engagement ring with him. Meanwhile, in another room at our duo's motel hideaway, Thelma consorts with a charming sociopath named J.D. (Brad Pitt), who shares with her the secrets of great sex and genteel robbery. But men aren't the solution. They are, at best, a new set of problems, part and parcel of the baggage the two need to leave behind. So, Thelma and Louise continue their journey alone—together. With every mile they travel, the two become less defined and controlled by men. They take joy in the moment and in each other. They come closer and closer to becoming whole and free as women. And that makes them dangerous. Ignored when they were good girls (and silent victims), these outlaws are now wanted women. "Like every other guy, he just loves the chase," Louise says of Jimmy. "He's got his work cut out for him, then," replies Thelma. Rejection triggers pursuit in patriarchy, and not just in the romantic sense. Escape from the control of men is not a socially acceptable option for women. The powers that be aren't about to let these women get away. Alive, anyway. Thelma and Louise, our allegorical everywomen, refuse to be taken. (Never again.) Hunted to the ends of the earth, they hang on tight to one another and continue their flight to freedom. Do they get away? In the most important sense of the word, they do. And that is why the tears women shed at the end of this movie are not tears of sadness alone. As skillful as Callie Khouri is in wedding natural dialogue to mythic storytelling, Thelma & Louise would have been just a gender switch on the buddy/outlaw/road picture without the performance of Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis in the lead. And when I use the singular of the word "performance," that's no typo. The work of these two fine actors is so deeply intertwined, so symbiotic, it's difficult to judge where one starts and the other leaves off. Both women are magnificenL The dynamics of the friendship that is Thelma-and- Louise shifts constantly throughout the movie. In the beginning, Louise is the mentor, the protector. As Thelma mends her self-esteem and becomes the bodacious bandit, Louise takes strength from Thelma's reckless elation. In the end, they are equals, loving friends who decide on and meet their fate together. I never doubted that these two had performances of this caliber in them. They just never had material of this complexity and wcOT-_n-aJTinriing vitality before. But if I knew that Sarandon and Davis were up to the task, I had no idea that Ridley Scott was capable of directing this kind of women's story. Sensitivity and emotional intimacy have never been his forte as a filmmaker. And women in his movies (e.g., Kate Capshaw in 1989's Black Rain) are often plot conveniences more than characters. True, he was the director who launched Sigoumey Weaver as Ripley in Alien (1979), but he is more associated with male mythology in visually stunning but emotionally sterile films like Blade Runner (1982). Ridley is still in love with the Look of his movies, and he is still overly fond of his big canvas. But only once or twice did the slick visuals and prominent soundtrack strike a false note here. Not even the big rocks of Canyonlands and Arches National Park (lit up in ways Mother Nature never dreamed of) could dwarf the intensity and humanity of this picture. That such a hue and cry should be leveled against the violence of Thelma 6\ Louise is particularly ironic when Scott's last film, Black Rain, had ten times the blood and bad attitude. In it, the manly hero, played by Michael Douglas, is a crooked cop with a "Fuck you very much!" attitude towards everyone. Under investigation in New York for taking drug pay-offs, Douglas is sent off to Japan to deliver a member of the yakusa to Japanese authorities. When he mistakenly hands over his prisoner to the wrong men, he has the perfect excuse to roam the foggy, rain- slicked, neon-lit mean streets of Osaka and wreak havoc. As a macho man of the movies, Douglas gets to say things like: "Sometimes you have to forget your head and grab your balls." Judging from his actions, he does have a brain the size of a testicle, but that doesn't keep him from getting his man and giving Japanese authorities a lesson in police procedure. Our hero claims his violent approach to life as the American way, and, therefore, the right way of doing things. And it must be. By the movie's end, Michael's new Japanese partner is delivering firepower and lines like "Sometimes you have to go for it!" with equal enthusiasm. While few critics raved over Black Rain, neither was it savaged, as Thelma & Louise has repeatedly been, for providing "horrible role models" for youthful viewers. Racist arrogance, corruption, and the urge to spray large numbers of people with bullets seems reasonable enough for a male protagonist Let a woman blow away a rapist or blow up the property of a sexual harasser, and the critics start fearing for the souls of America's womenfolk. And well they should. Give a listen to the female members of an audience watching Thelma &. Louise, and you will likely hear exclamations of delight when Thelma finally tells off her husband. You're bound to also hear loud enthusiastic cheers when the two avenge themselves on a sexist trucker who refuses to mend his ways and say he's sorry. Some women even hoot their approval when the rapist is shot dead. Callie Khouri *s subversive little screenplay is two hours of female—and, yes, feminist—catharsis. It puts most women watching it in touch with their hatred of male violence and oppression and, just as importantly, their love of other women. This is not a story about men or male-bashing. It is a story about resisting patriarchy even to the point of crossing over the line and going over the edge. Before her transformation into a desperado, Thelma says of her husband: "He's an asshole.. .. Most of the time, I just let it slide." Thelma & Louise, a movie women are making a word-of-mouth hit, is the story of two women emphatically refusing to let it slide anymore. No wonder the boys are so alarmed at the idea of these two becoming "role models." Kat hi Maio has never packed a rod. She is, however, happy to have recently been labeled an "extremist* by a major Southern newspaper. Kathi Maio is the author of two books of feminist film essays. Feminist in the Dark ($7.95/pub. 1988) and Popcorn and Sexual Politics ($9.95/pub. 1991). Her books are sold at Inklings Bookshop, 1846 Richmond. What's New With Taxes? Again this year, not much has changed for the middle income earners. Those earning under $20,000 who have children and those earning over $100,000 are experiencing the most change. Look for more "middle" advantages, such as expanded IRA deductability, to be proposed by Congress next year; it will be a Presidential election year. Earned Income Credits The big news for household heads and married couples raising kids on under $21,250 is that the earned income has expanded from a one line do-it-yourself number to a two-page form. The people who do free tax returns for folks in need have announced that this is a "sign the return and let the government figure the credit" item. Promises to vote for revision are already being lined up in congress, but for 1991 returns, we'll have to live with it. These are the three key points. First, the credit is a few dollars less for one qualifying child than for two or more. Secondly, if you paid for family health insurance, that total and the name of the insurer gets a credit. Third, if you had a baby born in 1991, you get a new baby credit. Itemizing Professional women and couples generally look to itemized deductions for tax savings. Personal interest is out. Home mortgage interest and investment interest are deductible, as are real estate taxes. Charity is deductible, so add up those checks to KPFT! Heartsong has received its federal tax exemption letter from IRS, so look at the fair market (yard sale) value of items given to their garage sales. (Womynspace is not tax exempt.) Miles driven for charity are worth twelve cents each. A percentage reduction formula is applied to medical and miscellaneous items. All itemized deductions are compared to the standard deduction; one deducts the greater of the two. Business First The standard mileage rate is now 27 L/2 cents per mile. Self-employed women know the disadvantages of paying a much higher social security tax than employees. Some of the advantages over employee expenses are that business expenses are deductible directly off income and that more generous deductions are available for self employed retirement plans. One can hire and oav one's own children to work in the business. As long as they are under 18 and don't earn more than $3,400, you won't pay social security tax and they won't owe income tax. if s, And's or But's All of these things are general statements. For every rule there is an exception. The general mood of the Service is that simplification is in. Fairness is impossible, for it makes the rules too complex. Or so they say. Kathy Hubbard is a tax practitioner in private practice. J. M. GAYLES AND ASSOCIATES ANGELA M. PASSARETTI MSW-CSW • LIFE TRANSITIONS • RELATIONSHIP CONCERNS • CAREER DECISIONS • FULL POTENTIAL DEV. • TRAUMA RESOLUTION • DEPRESSION &. ANXIETY Call For An Appointment 668-0381