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The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991
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The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991 - Page 4. December 1991. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2762/show/2752.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1991). The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2762/show/2752

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991 - Page 4, December 1991, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2762/show/2752.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Wand, Vol. 8, No. 12, December 1991
Publisher Womynspace
Date December 1991
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .W35
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3634790~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Note On some pages, comic strips have been digitally obscured to protect owner's copyright.
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Title Page 4
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_459d.jpg
Transcript Film Thelma & Louise Take Flight byKathiMaio "If you see one film this summer .. ." advise the flack- sters. "A must-see movie!" exclaim the pull-quotes from the critical establishment How many times have you seen or heard phrases like this? Countless times, no doubt. Unfortunately, the people who create ads for movies aren't exactly trustworthy advisors. And, sad to say, the people who review heavily promoted (and advertised) movies can't always be trusted, either. Word of mouth is still one of the best gauges of whether a movie is worth seeing. And the word of mouth on Thelma & Louise is that it is the proverbial "must-see" movie of this summer. If you listen to female voices, that is. Men who have seen Thelma & Louise are just as likely to label it a no-see. The gender split on this one is pronounced I can't recall another film that has so enchanted women viewers—and outraged men. With several notable exceptions, the boys in both the general public and the media have been getting hot under the collar about this film. So hot that their polyester is melting. Columnists for major news dailies are sputtering about "male-bashing." A columnist for U.S. News and World Report calls the movie "Toxic Feminism" and ties it to "Andrea Dworkin and the most alienated radical feminists." (Sounds good already, don't it?) "Here we have an explicit fascist theme," John Leo foolishly asserts. (Talk about the pot calling the kettle aluminum!) People's "Picks & Pans" man, Ralph Novak, got his boxers in a twist, too. Finding the title heroes to be "two self-absorbed, irresponsible, worthless people," he made one of the most preposterous statements I've ever seen in a review: "Any movie that went as far out of its way to trash women as this female chauvinist sow of a film does to trash men would be universally, and justifiably, condemned." If only that were true! On the contrary, woman-bashing is so widespread and socially acceptable in film that most folks—especially male critics—don't even notice it anymore. Yes, Thelma & Louise, written by avowed feminist and first-time screenwriter Callie Khouri, gives men a taste of their own medicine. But that doesn't mean that the film is about trashing men. (It's comical Susan Sarandon (left) and Geena Davis in Thelma and Louise the way men need to believe that everything in life revolves around guys and guy stuff. What was that about "self-absorbed," Mr. Novak?) Thelma & Louise is about women. Moreover, this vastly entertaining buddies-on-the-mn movie is also a modern allegory about women coming into their own power to resist male violence and reject male authority. Given that, the indignant male response is perfectly understandable. Thelma Dickinson (Geena Davis) is an Arkansas home- maker, too frightened of her philandering husband, Darryl (Christopher McDonald), to "ask permission" to go on a fishing trip with her long-time best buddy, Louise Sawyer (Susan Sarandon). As her first act of defiance, Thelma sneaks off, leaving a note in the microwave. She's packed everything for her little weekend getaway, including a gun. It's Louise who first uses the pistol, defending Thelma from a rapist at a country-western bar. From that point on, the two are on the lam, racing through the Southwest in Louise's '66 T-bird convertible. They become outlaws, not because they want to be, but because men won't leave them alone. (Look carefully, each of their crimes is a response to an offense against them by men.) Cops from four states, plus the FBI, pursue them. These are the men who want to lock them up. There are others who put more intimate snares in their path. Continued on next page First printed in Sojourner: The Women's Forum, Vol. 16 No. 11 (July 1991). For subscriptions (12/yr), send $17.50 to Sojourner, 42 Seaverns Ave., Boston, MA 02130. Sojourner is sold locally at Inklings. MARCH ON WASHINGTON 1993 —by Deborah Bell The more that I am involved as a lesbian activist, the more that I believe that the key to our social acceptance and civil rights lie in our visibility. The empowerment gained by actions such as the Texas Lesbian Conference, The March on Austin, and Queer Nation demonstrations, are meaningful on a political and personal level. In 1987, 500,000 (some say that 650,000 is a more correct count) lesbian, gay, and allied people marched in Washington, DC, in the largest civil rights demonstration ever seen in the nation's capital. In three days of actions and protests we irrevocably demonstrated the strength of our community. Organizing has started for another national march scheduled for April 25, 1993. This date was chosen not to conflict with the massive nationwide Anti-Columbus actions planned for 1992. A meeting in Dallas is planned for Sunday, December 15, to select representatives to serve on the National Steering Committee which will meet in Los Angeles on January 18. Texas is in Region #6 which includes Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. There has already been a significant amount of work done by the Interim Coordination Committee (ICC) . To date, two national meetings have adopted an organizing structure that relies on grassroots organizing at the state and regional levels. This march will be the cumulative effort of thousands of people. Your participation is needed if we are to mobilize over a mil lion people (2 million?) in little over a year. No experience is necessary, only your dedication. There is a commitment that the committees have gender parity and be made up of at least 50% people of color. We get , to have four representatives from our region and would like to have four alternates selected as well. Region #6 representatives at the Creating Change Conference additionally have made a commitment to raise money so that people who may be economically disadvantaged can participate. Yes kids, this all takes time, work, and money. Isn't it worth it? Checks may be sent to March on Washington, P.O. Box 34607, Washington DC, 20043-4607. Aid our region as well, wait for our local fund raiser. FMI, call Deborah Bell 713- 521-0780, particularly if you want to attend the Dallas meeting.