Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981
Page 5
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981 - Page 5. November 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2739/show/2733.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1981). Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2739/show/2733

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981 - Page 5, November 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2739/show/2733.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter; Coalition of Greater Houston National Organization for Women Chapters
Date November 1981
Description Broadside, Vol. 12, No. 11; Herizons, Vol. 6, No. 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_005e.jpg
Transcript November, 1981 BROADSIDE/HERIZONS Page 5 State and local laws requiring parental consent, intimidating counselling sessions, excessive waiting periods and generally singling out women, who seek abortion for harassment are passing all over the country. Waiting for the courts to strike down these laws takes too long and has an uncertain risk. It is better to prevent the passage and enactment of such laws. *********************************************************** In conclusion to Yvonne's speech, below is a recent article about her, and an article taken from our National NOW Times. Working in a lab where the extraordinary is the ordinary is what makes Yvonne Broach's job interesting. "We never know what type of chromosome arrangement we will see," said the assistant chief medical technologist in the cytogenetics lab. "Leukemia patients undergo a battery of tests, including a bone marrow specimen. We culture the bone marrow and grow cells. Then we look at the chromosomes for abnormalities." There are some established patterns for chromosome abnormalities in leukemic diseases, but not all the specimens fall neatly into a pattern. "Sometimes all we are able to say is that the arrangement is abnormal," she said, "It may belong to a pattern sequence that we don't yet know about. The discovery of the patterns is relatively new, so it is probable that there are many others we won't detect until we have a much larger specimen sample." Broach has a master's in genetics. "During my work on the master's, I got interested in cytogenetics. There was no formal program in it, so I read everything 1 could and attended any lectures on the subject. When I got out of school, I took a job in cytogenetics to get experience and some on-the-job training." In that job, she did get the experience, but the routine of the work made her look for something more challenging. "The specimens in that lab were rarely abnormal. It was extremely rare to come across the kinds of things we get here every day." Broach and her co-workers do the cultures on all leukemia patients in the clinic and hospital. "We do the tissue culture, photograph the specimen and then do the karyotypes of the chromosomes," she said. It is in the karyotype, an arrangement of the chromosomes in descending order by their size and shape, that the technicians are able to detect abnormalities. Away from the lab. Broach is active in the Gulf Coast chapter of the Association for Women in Science. "The organization is open to women in science at all levels and encourages them to enter the field and their advancement in it," she said. To encourage young women to enter the field, Broach often speaks to high school classes and other groups. She also is a past president of one of the Houston-area chapters of the National Organization for Women (NOW). "I guess I've been a feminist from an early age," she said. "My interest in science isolated me in some ways from other women and strengthened my beliefs for equality for women. Houston has an active feminist community and I've enjoyed working in it." Her special interests include the Equal Rights Amendment and women's health issues. "I think there is still a lot of education to be done on both issues," she said. In what little spare time there is, she enjoys jogging, playing the piano and going to the movies, especially science fiction. She admits to sitting through five sci-fi movies in one day, "although it's not something I'd do again real soon." D TOUl Bradeil (Taken from National NOW Times) A Father and Sen. Helms I have been wondering whether to tell you a personal story that seems to me to have general implications. This is one of those sad family stories that normally you don't find fathers talking about in public, or even very much with close friends. But I picked up the newspaper the other day to read that a Senate committee had voted to abolish payments for abortions for the poor, even when the pregnancies are the result of rape. Now this was not a question of cutting the budget. Abortion costs for poor women who are raped do not amount to a large sum Rather it was a question of morality. Republican Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina, and the Moral Majoirty, which follows him around, are convinced that abortion is wrong even when the woman who wants one wants it because she has been raped So I don't think it will be very long before Jesse and his friends are going to come after the unpoor In this instance, I am not very comfortable about being unpoor. I object to what the Senate committee did. But I have the human instinct to object even more strenuously when I reason that, by the same standard with which the senators dealt with the poor, they will shortly deal with me. So let me tell you my story. A few years ago one of my daughters attended an enormous Fourth of July celebration at the Washington Monument. It was a free show with fireworks and flags and entertainment, and, according to the newspaper account, the large crowd behaved well. But as my daughter strolled alone off the Monument grounds and en tered a side street, a car rolled up next to the sidewalk. Three men emerged from it, seized her roughly and. before she could do more than utter a half- stifled cry, put her into the back seat where two more men held her to the floor. She was tied, gagged and taken to a house, the location of which she cannot now identify. She was kept in the house for the rest of the night during which time she was repeatedly beaten and raped. The next morning she was blindfolded, driven back to the Monument grounds and shoved out of the car Eventually, sometime about midday, she made her way home. During the time she was gone, there was, of course, a great deal of worry and anxiety at that home. And I must confess, anger. Her arrival was followed by various interviews with policemen who tried to be helpful to a hysterical girl. But couldn't be. Because the hysterical girl could only estimate the time she had been in the car, describe the inside of a house and sob out some meaningless first names. That's really the end of the story. Except, of course, that within a very short time, my daughter knew that she was pregnant. Now I would like to ask Sen. Helms what he would do if he had been the father of the girl. I know what I did. And I can promise the senator and the Moral Majority and all the shrill voices of the Right to Life Movement, that no matter what law they may pass and how stringent the penalty, I would do it again. 1981 Los Angeles Times Syndicate