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Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981
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Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981 - Page 4. November 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2739/show/2732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1981). Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2739/show/2732

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981 - Page 4, November 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2739/show/2732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside-Herizons Coalition, November 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter; Coalition of Greater Houston National Organization for Women Chapters
Date November 1981
Description Broadside, Vol. 12, No. 11; Herizons, Vol. 6, No. 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 4
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Transcript Page 4 BROADSIDE/HERIZONS November, IQSl ************** A HISTORY OF ABORTION PRACTICES ************ By Yvonne Broach This is the seventh in a series of excerpts from Yvonne's speech regarding past abortion practices. In 1970, Hawaii, Alaska, and New York repealed criminal abortion laws and liberalized abortion during the first three months. Also, in 1970 a single pregnant woman, with the pseudonym of Jane Roe, sued Dallas County District Attorney Henry Wade to prevent him from enforcing the Texas anti-abortion statute. In 1971 and 1972 the case was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court and January 22, 1973, the court ruled that the Texas anti-abortion statute and all others like it were unconstitutional. This portion of the decision would have left the nation with an abortion policy more tolerant than the common law had been 200 years earlier. The Justices quickly made it clear they did not intend this. They expressed three concerns: the right of privacy in intimate matters affecting a person's life and future; maternal health; and the state's right to protect developing life. The 1973 decision thus declares that during the first three months, the decision to abort is a woman's right and cannot be denied; during the second trimester, the decision to abort is still a woman's right and cannot be denied, but the state may regulate the practice to ensure her health and safety. In the third trimester, the state can exercise its legitimate interest in life by prohibiting abortion except to preserve the life or health of the woman. This is the law of the land concerning the choice and practice of abortion. About one million abortions are performed each year, but far fewer women die or suffer longlasting effects than when abortion was illegal. Abortion-related deaths dropped nearly 600$ by 1974. However, we have recently begun to experience an erosion of the right to choose an abortion. Anti-abortionists are using every tactic they can seize to outlaw abortion again. Already, abortion is denied to almost all women who are poor and need public funding for the procedure. Employees of the military and most government agencies overseas must resort to local facilities, if they exist, as they often are not easily available to Americans in foreign countries.