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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 5, May 1980
Page 11
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 5, May 1980 - Page 11. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2721/show/2717.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 5, May 1980 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2721/show/2717

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 5, May 1980 - Page 11, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2721/show/2717.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 5, May 1980
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
Date May 1980
Publisher National Organization for Women. Bay Area Chapter
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_397k.jpg
Transcript 5 HOW TO MOVE WOMEN INTO APPOINTIVE OFFICE 9 If women are to participate in public affairs in proportion to their 53 percent representation in the population and if the female perspective is to be a significant component of public policy and practice we must increase the numbers of women in public life. During recent years more women have won elective offices, but not yet in proportion to their numbers. However, there is another avenue to adequate representation: the appointment of more women to the numerous boards and commissions which advise and set policy at all levels of government. The fact that women have yet to be found in representative numbers in important appointive positions is a challenge to all who believe in equal representation. WHAT DO OFFICIALS CONSIDER WHEN MAKING APPOINTMENTS? Competency. Officials prefer to appoint a competent person who will be a credit and not an embarrassment to the appointer and whose appointment will receive public acclaim. Demonstrated by past performance, competency is the ability to: — Understand the political climate, especially that of the appointing official: Monitor Upcoming Appointments. — Keep careful watch of upcoming vacancies at least several months ahead to provide adequate time to promote a candidate — Check new^ and other sources for vacancies created b\ resignation or death FOR WOMC: Mount a Campaign on Behalf of a Candidate. An organization must decide whether it is more effective to develop a public or private approach or a combination of the two. If a private approach is selected, then the organization might decide to: — Ask an intermediary with special influence to propose and endorse the candidate to the appointing official; — Write a letter to the official with careful documentation of a candidate's qualifications; and — Ask other groups to work for the candidate. (However, an organization does not wage a public effort.) If the organization decides to use a public approach, then it could: — Meet with other organizations to select a mutually agreed-upon candidate; — Form a committee to back appointment; — Circulate petitions on behalf of the candidate; — Solicit members of participating organizations to write to the appointing official (these must never be form letters); and — Utilize the media to promote the candidate through letters to the editor, participating in talk shows and news releases. Promote Affirmative Action in Appointments. Local political parties can encourage and assist formation of a women's caucus or committee as an appointive or a voluntary group and can: — Develop a local roster of women candidates; — Develop and use a calendar of appointments; — Propose and support local women for appointment; and — Monitor and report results to officers and membership. Representation of a Constituency, Government heads are also concerned with appointing individuals who are leaders of a particular group or organization and who, thus, represent a constituency. Often the appointing official views this constituency as potentially supportive of his/her programs and possibly of election to future office. Balance may also be a concern--to appoint a board or commission whose membership would include representation from a wide spectrum of interest groups, citizenry, political parties, and geographic backgrounds. An individual has a constituency when he/she is recognized as an outstanding advocate of a group's special concerns.