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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981 - Page 10. January 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2670/show/2665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1981). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2670/show/2665

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981 - Page 10, January 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2670/show/2665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date January 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 10
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File Name femin_201109_238j.jpg
Transcript Battered Husbands: Victms of Wives BY ROBERT SHIELDS London —"No man/' said Wuhammad, "should beat his wife — even with a flower." piat some men do batter heir wives arouses, rightly jnough, a mixture of revulsion nd pity in the public mind, bdistic behavior is not, how- [ver, solely a male preroga- ive. Admittedly, husband battering is net usually of the crude, grievous bodily harm variety, rhere are other, and much pnore common, kinds of wifely cruelty. For example, Dr. T. was on a ward round when his bleep sounded. Going to the phone ne heard the agitated voice of his wife. "You left the electric saw out on the workbench, and Tom has cut his thumb off with it!" He was driving furiously through the traffic before he realized that he hadn't asked his wife to which hospital his young son had been taken. There was nothing to do but race home — an hour's drive — to see if there was a note, or if a neighbor could help him. At home he found the front door open and dashed in. His wife was reading a book. She didn't look up. "Where is Tom?" he gasped. M A t school, of course. Why?" She sounded surprised. "You said he'd cut his thumb off!" "Did I?" she said, calmly turning a page. "Well, he might have done it. with you leaving your tools around like that." This was no isolated incident in the lives of this couple, but just one in an endless series of destructive attacks on the husband. For the most miner cause she would attack him physically, scratching his face or pulling out handsful of hair. Several times he woke at night to find her standing over Ihim with a knife in her hand. , In company, and in front of the children, she could be violently abusive or would ridicule him and his supposed sexual inadequacies. She occasionally wrote notes to his colleagues telling them that he was impotent, which he was not, or that his medical quali- bands:. Victims of Wives With Angry Vtfoman Syndrome's fixations were spurious. Bizarre as this kind oi behavior may seem in a professionally successful and woman would occasionally j tear her own nightdress and! then run into the street and! plead with passersby to help, well-educated person, it is not her "because my husband hasj untypical of women who £°ne mad and is trying to kill exemplify the "angry woman syndrome," a term coined by Dr. Nathan Rickles, a California psychiatrist. These women, says Rickles, are often latently homosexuals and harbor a deep envy and suspicion of men, which leads to victimization of their husbands. The husband, however, is not always the only victim. The children may be brought in deliberately. In order to punish her husband after a quarrel, Mrs. L. would sometimes go to a hotel for a day or two, taking her daughter with her. On one occasion she returned from such an absence to find that her husband had fed the family dog. She flew into a rage. ''That's my dog," she yelled. 4Tve told you that l'mthe only one allowed to feed him." She grabbed their 13-year-old by the throat. "Unless you get down on your knees and apologize, and swear you'll never feed the dog again, I'll choke her to death." He did as he was told. Explaining his compliance the husband said, "She's so ruthless when she is in a rage that there is no knowing what she will do. She is a dangerous woman/' This young wife actually drowned her daughter's kitten in front of her because she took too long eating her dinner. And if the woman and her husband had a disagreement when the child was in bed, she would open the door and scream, "Daddy's killing me" till the child ran in terror. Psychological Warfare me." Another woman frequently ran to her doctor and her friends to show the scratches and bruises her husband had inflicted on her. These minor injuries had been sustained only when her husband was trying to disengage himself from her violent attacks. Facade of Normality Usually, however, thse couples will make strenuous efforts to present a facade of normality to the outside world. Their friends do not suspect the high degree of anger and misery within the home, and it comes to light only when one or the other seeks psychiatric help. Most of these women are socially well adjusted. They are often successful in their careers and give the impression of being outwardly attractive personalities. They do not lose touch with reality and can shift in an instant from a state of apparently uncontrollable rage to smiling gentleness when the doorbell rings. Why don't these hapless husbands simply pack their bags and go? Some do. of course, thereby confirming their wives' life-lcng conviction that men are not to be trusted. But most explain: "When there is an amnesty you couldn't find a nicer woman. Anyway, I love her. Besides, there are the children. I need them and they | need me. And if I l*ft, would she turn on one of them?" Or thene is the husband who says, "She doesn't mean to be cruel. She is ill in some way. I Perhaps I can help her. She is i rorry afterwards and has t promised never to do it j again." Actually she is not very Accorging to her psychia trist, one barrister's wife be-1 sorry afterwards and genuine came an expert in subtle repentance is rare, psychological warfare. She would, for instance, keep her f husband awake ail night when he had a crucial court case in the morning "by thumping out of bed, slamming doors and flushing toilets." Some of these wives seek Sunday, October 2D, 1974 HOUSTON CHRONICLE Because they are afraid of what they usually call a "confrontation" with their wives they tend to be patient, logical and" obsequious in situations where their wives expect them to be strong and uncompromising. They give in, back dewn. or run away, often because they are more afraid of their own'anger than they are of their wives'. The husbands are usually "nice" men. over-passive, conciliatory persons who want peace at any price but never get it. Outside the home they are often highly successful and adequately assertive. Their "niceness" in the Sunday, March 25,1979 Page &. Section 4 vvv Houston Chronicle Abused husband gets 25-year term ior murdering wife >ESSEX, Md. i AP) — A man whose wife of 25 years bfcat him and limited him to a 50-cent weekly allowance has been sentenced to 25 years in prison for kilimg the woman and chopping her body into 35 pieces. 1 *Yong Am Pin. 45. was convicted Friday after a two- dav nonjury trial of second-degree murder in the death of his wife, Im Sook Pin. 46. Her mutilated body was found was last July, sealed into jars and paint cans and hidden in a shed. : -Baltimore County Circuit Judge Marvin J. Land said the sentence was five years below the maximum penalty because of circumstances in Pin's marriage, which Land calied **a difficult and horrible existence — a nightmare." "The defense said Pin's wife inflicted 25 years of marital abuse on her husband, including physical beatings with a wooden meat mallet, taunting of extrarmntai affairs, limiting him to a 50-cent weekly allowance for personal needs and forbidding him to have friends. Testimony revealed the slaying occurred while Pin and his wife argued over her request that he buy her a | cassette tape recorder. Police testified Pm struck his wife in the head with an ashtray on July 16. then left the room and returned with a hammer and continued striking her. Then, according to testimony, her body was carved up over a two-day period into 35 pieces, packed mto containers and sealed with cement. Two days after the slaying, their 20-year-old daughter. I Tae Ja. reported her mother missing and told police herj father insisted his wife had run away to California. Pm sat quietly during the trial, facing the judge only when the sentence was imposed He saia he would "try* to carry out faithfully ' any penalty the court imposed. A psychiatrist. Dr. John M. Henderson, said Pin's method of disposing of the body was his way of regaining control. He said the disposal was "not sadistic'' but arose from a need to help him over the emotional hurdie of what had just occurred." allies outside the home. One i home is a cover-up for fear.