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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981 - Page 9. January 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2670/show/2664.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1981). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2670/show/2664

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981 - Page 9, January 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2670/show/2664.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date January 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 9
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File Name femin_201109_238i.jpg
Transcript Houston Chronicle Saturday/ February 28,1581 The lie that won't die Rumors continue to 'petition' sponsored THE LIE THAT won't die is circulating in Houston again, causing frustration for the local office of the Federal Communications Commission. "It's picking up again/' says Allen Cantrell, engineer-in-charge of the Houstonofficeof the FCC. It's a very simple, interesting story, except for one problem: It isn't true. The lie goes like this: Famed atheist Madalyn Murray O'Hair has filed a petition with the"FCC seeking to force religious broadcasting off the airwaves. As hundreds of other FCC employees around the country have been saying for years, Cantrell again this week said the story isn't true. Ms. O'Hair has not, (repeat, has not) filed any such petition. The genesis of the rumor is well known. How to stop it isn't. It got started in 1974 when two California men. Jeremy D. Lansman and Lorenzo W. Milam sought to keep new- religious programming off the airwaves reserved for education. They did not ask to eliminate current religious programming in any way and did not ask to limit new programming on commercial stations. The FCC turned down the Lansman- Miiam petition, and that was that, so the FCC thought. Ms. O'Hair, of Austin, has been in- spread concerning by Austin atheist volved in a number of petitions and law suits seeking to remove religion from the government and schools, but. she was never involved in the Lansman-Milam petition. In fact, she didn't even support it. But somehow as the story spread Ms. O'Hair's name got attached to the exaggerated petition. Today, the rumor does not bear the names of Lansman and Milam, and the two men would likely not even recognize their own petition in the rumor because it has grown to such proportions. It would all be hilariously funny, except for the problems the rumor is causing the FCC. Millions and millions of petitions and phone calls have pour-, ed into FCC offices, requiring millions of federal dollars to sort and answer the calls and petitions. They corner from concerned people wanting to; fight Ms. O'Hair Vpetition. Thousands of churches across the country, including Houston, have printed false statements that the petition exists, thus adding credence to the lie. This week the local FCC office began calling the Houston media to say that the petitions and phone calls are picking up again. "It's heavier than it was a year ago," said Cantrell. Said Martha Wiiliford of the local FCC office: "Please help us stop this rumor/' — LOUIS MOORE Ctaaf. «9£f ^ Hrl I Houston Chronicle Sunday, March 1,1981 ke Royko Leaping into the flay £ 1981, Chicago Sun-Times NOBODY but a hermit has to be told that child abuse is a terrible problem. Not long ago. aa Illinois couple was charged with murder when a 5-year-oid child was beaten beyond description. There are so many suspected cases that law enforcement agencies can't keep up with them. There's nothing new about child abuse. It's not something thai came along in modern times It's been going on as long as there have b< ' on defenseless children. years has society recognized the problem and stepped in with laws to protect these children. Getting the laws through hasn't been easy since it was long accept ed that parents pretty well 1 their own children, includini state can step in and pr will be safe. what they chose with aching bags. Children se is bad enough; the I put the child where it Most people wouldn't argue with that concept. If anything, mord enforcement is needed. More children die of abuse than of many cmkihood diseases for which we've found medical cures. People who work in the child-abuse field are constantly frustrated by the hit-or- miss process of uncovering the abuse before it is too fate, and by judges who return children to homes where it is just a matter of time1 before they'U be pounded again. I But progress has been made, and most people would agree that it'd a good thing. Most people, but not all. There is one group that would like to see the child-abuse law^ softened to the point where a parent could whip a child without it being anybody's business but the wielder of the whip. J And what organization would be this cold-hearted? None other than the Moral Majority, that grim-lipped network o£ political Bible-thumpers. It seems that the Moral Majority was upset when it learned that af social worker in Indianapolis had taken a child away from a divorced father when the child's maternal grandparents complained that thej father was whipping the child so severely that he was raising welts. ' The Moral Majority did not think that welts on the child's body w^re a sufficient reason to take it from its natural father. A preacher who is the leader of the Indiana branch of the Morar Majority said the Bible tells parents to whip their children to discW pline them. The father who raised welts on a little child was just! following the Good Book's teachings. So in order to prevent social workers from interfering with those parents who would follow the teachings of the Bible by beating the living hell out of a defenseless child, the Moral Majority is going to lobby to get Indiana's child- abuse laws changed. If it gets the changes that it wants, a parent will be able to whip an infant in its crib without any godless social workers doing the work of the oP devil and snatching the child away, hallelujah! Fortunately, most people don't think the way the Moral Majority does. Even in so conservative a state as Indiana, it's not likelv that the child-abuse laws will be weakened to the point of permitting the whipping of infants. But it gives us a warning as to the kind of weird ideas we can expect from the Moral Majority, which intends to become a social and political power during these "conservative times. These people are going to try to stick their noses into the nation's bedrooms and forbid* anything that offends them I or, in their own secret dreams, titillates them). They are going to peek in our clothes hampers and brood about what we are doing that might be fun when they ain't looking. Some of them are concerned about motels along interstate highways renting to couples that can't prove they are married. Others are frantic about a bakery that, as a tcngue-in-cheek" stunt, sells pornographic cookies. The thing to remember about the Moral Majority is that their areas of "reform" have nothing to do with morality — they have to do wi:h their personal hangups. Their attitude is that if they don't like it, or if they like it but are afraid of being struck by lightning, or if they like it but can't find anybody to do it with — then nobodv else should do il. „ go try So we have people who can't think of any other way to reason with a small child than by whipping it wanting whips snapping off hunks of babies' hides all over the country. We have people who can't see the ribald humor in sexy cookies wanting the rest of th^ country forbidden from buying them. We have people who can't pass a motel without having dirty thoughts about what must be going on in those rooms rx I anybody they don't approve of checking in. l-': ' st a ers do in a motel room or their own bedroom, or what t^nd of cookies other people buy. And - pie don't think the Lord really wants parents whip- sadistic hearts' content ty is going to pursu< .o have a catch;. Sot ke:*'Families that fiay together, pr"u> together/' a bumper sticker, preacher?