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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 3, March 1980
Page 11
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 3, March 1980 - Page 11. March 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2584/show/2582.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1980). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 3, March 1980 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2584/show/2582

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 3, March 1980 - Page 11, March 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2584/show/2582.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 3, March 1980
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date March 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_395k.jpg
Transcript POLITICS Support Your ERA. You Didn't Get Where You Are Alone BY JANE O'REILLY SOMEONE KNOCKS AT your door and asks you to donate time and money toward passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. What is the correct response? - 1 gave at the office. - I got where I am today all by myself. Why can't other women? - I'm a feminist, of course, but I'm not a joiner and I don't consider myself part of any movement. - I don't think the ERA will ever pass. Why don't we work for something we can win? 1 hate to be on the losing side ol anything. - I don't want to seem like a crank. All the gains have been won. - We already have enough laws to make us equal. - What exactly is the Equal Rights Amendment, anyway? Or, - I'm so glad you asked. I'm a successful, savvy woman, and by now the very thought of the ERA exhausts me. We've been trying to pass an equal rights amendment since 1923—56 years! It's incredible that it should even be necessary, that halt the population—my half—is not included in the Constitution o! the United States. When 1 think about what that means, that I am not considered equal under the laws of this democratic country, that 1 am a second-class citizen, I get so angry 1 get tired. Powcrlessness is wearying. Successful women can't express anger at the system without seeming to be cranks. So we waste our energy being mad at other women. Take the older women, the "1 did it myself, why should I help other women?" crowd. They are the ones who felt the fiercest strain of being odd, of always having to be better than men. Like a fraternity hazing, they had to eat worms to get into the club. Isn't Jane O'AY/V/v's collection of essays on •women's issues, The Girl 1 Left Behind Me, will be published by Macmillan in the spring. that reason enough to change the system, not perpetuate it? And the younger women, the ones who think all the gams are already won. Do they think they can get into medical school simply because they are smart? Don't they know that they are being admitted to professional schools, being hired by corporations, being granted tenure, because thev have to be, because hundreds of other women went to court to demand enforcement of affirmative-action laws? How can they deny they are part of the movement when they are reaping the benefits won by thousands of women—pregnant teachers, older stewardesses, university women, A.T.&T. workers, reporters, even Little League girls—who risked expensive, discouraging, embarrassing years fighting to get and keep their jobs and to redress past discrimination? Without the Equal Rights Amendment, the lawsuits will go on forever. Even with the Amendment, the battles will go on, but at least we will have a better weapon—a universal legal definition of equality of the sexes. Saying we already have enough laws to make us equal is false comfort. We have a lot of laws designed to make us equal, but they apply only to some parts of our lives, and some parts ot the country, and are subject to the whims ot legislators and the interpretation ot the courts. We have many more laws based on the presumption that women are not equal, and the Supreme Court, without an equal rights amendment, does not consider laws that discriminate against women as automatically suspect (as racial discrimination is considered automatically suspect). A woman who believes we already have enough laws will be surprised, if she gets a divorce in Georgia, to find that the house occupied by the family is the property of the husband even if she has earned the money and made the payments, or, if she and her husband jointly run a business in Maine, to learn that the profits are the propert) of the husband. HOW CAN WE TALK about gains, when women are still making 57 cents for ever) dollar men earn in the United States? When only 276 women serve on the corporate boards of the biggest 1,300 corporations? When women and children make up 79 percent of the poor in this countt)'? When 50.8 percent ot the college population is now women, but women with five years of college are still paid less than men with four years of high school? When women make up 40 percent ot the work force but 80 percent ot us are in the lowest paying, dead-end jobs? When 94 percent ot the people making over SI5,000 a year are white males? Maybe that's the reason men tell us we don't need the ERA. Sure, it would be nice to be on the winning side. So let's make sure we are. Without equal rights, women will always be on the losing side. Thirty- five states have ratified the ERA. We need three more, and we organized and won an extension until June 30, 1982 to get them. No one is going to push the ERA except us. I'm not a crank. I'm smart enough to have something to say, and in a position to be heard. I have an obligation to all women—including myself. How much money do you want, how man)' telegrams shall I send, how many speeches shall 1 give? Where do 1 join? Which is your answer? raced by Jean I rancois Allaux