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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Page 12
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 12. May 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2566.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2566

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 12, May 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2566.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_517l.jpg
Transcript PREGNANCY continued from page 6 policies, each with its own rationale. One of the justifications most frequently heard for the mandatory policies is that maternity leave protects the health of the woman and her unborn child. How a long enforced period of unemployment does so is hard to imagine. True, there are some women who have difficult pregnancies, and there are certain kinds of jobs that might truly be hazardous to a pregnant woman; naturally, special measures may have to be taken in special cases. But the great majority of pregnant women are in normal health;' they can (and do) go about their normal activities right up to the date of delivery. If employers are truly concerned about the health of their workers, perhaps they should realize that a pregnant woman will eat better and get better medical care if her livelihood has not been curtailed by enforced un - employment. No doubt, also, her mental health will profit if she is not left to worry about paying her bills. When a job does involve specific duties hazardous even to pregnant women in good health, then certainly the answer is not automatically to terminate or suspend employment, but to try first to arrange a temporary transfer to less strenuous duty. There will be very few employment situations in which accommodations of this kind are not possible. Another common argument is that pregnant women do not work efficiently. This may be true in some case, but some women are not all women, or even most women. Mandatory maternity leaves are founded on the stereotyped assumption that pregnancy somehow incapacitates any woman, making her unfit to perform her job. Employers who routinely send pregnant employees off on maternity leave at six or seven months do not wait to see if they will continue to work well; they simply assume the worst. Some employers profess to be worried about the risk of a lawsuit if something should happen to a pregnant woman on the job. But something "could happen" to any employee; it is only that same notion about the special delicacy of pregnant women that makes employers single them out for "special treatment." Then, of course, there is no denying the fact that many employers consider pregnant women to be an embarrassment. Concerned that the "condition" will be noticed, employers make distinctions between maternity regulations for workers who are in contact with the public and those who work "behind the scenes." A disturbing element of many mandatory leave policies is their total reliance upon the decision of a woman's supervisor or department head as to when employment should cease. These policies sound better than those with fixed time limits because they appear to take into account individual needs and differences. In fact, they leave employees completely at the mercy of someone else's unsubstantiated judgment or prejudices. An increasing number of employers is abandoning the concept of the fixed maternity leave in favor of reliance upon the advice of a pregnant employee's doctor and the wishes of the employee herself. This is as it should be, except for one thing: many employers still ask pregnant women to bring certifications from their doctors stating that they may safely remain on the job until a specified date. Such a certification of fitness is seldom required of employees with ulcers or asthma, but the mystique of pregnancy is so strong that employers seem to require special assurance. The same assurances are often required by employers when a woman who has undergone childbirth wishes to return to work. Where the discrimination comes in is not that the certificates are required, but that such assurances are not routinely demanded in the cases of an employee out with a heart attack or other disabling condition who wishes to return to employment. As a result of the maternity leave policies regulating the time a pregnant woman must leave or return to work, women are deprived of the opportunity to work for a living long before they are physically disabled. It is this pattern that must now be challenged. $1,000 Prize for the Best Essay: JA^erkaruWomenf fiicmtmniab (ssay (onteflr □ WANTED: 1,000-to 2,000-word essays on the life and contributions of a woman in America - or a class of women - whose history has been hidden. Women in political life, in business, in social justice movements . . . pioneer women - farm women - religious women - slave women. D OPEN TO: Female and male students in grades 9-12 □ DEADLINE FOR ESSAYS: June 11, 1976, postmark D JUDGING: On the basis of original research and quality of presentation - by Betty Friedan, Sheila Tobias, Mary Jean Tully, & Dr. Lenore J. Weitzman Exhibit now at Blaffer Paintings and graphic works by Norwegian Expressionist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) are on display at the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Gallery at the University of Houston through May 23. Psychological themes prevail in Munch's works, especially concerning tensions between the sexes. Of the 18 paintings included in the exhibition six are from the Blaffer collection and represent the largest single concentration of paintings by j Munch in the United States. There are 116 graphic works. Included among them are several studies of The Kiss, a personal favorite of the late Sarah Campbell Blaffer. 3 & S Woman with the Brooch (Madonna) - 1903 Lithograph Houston Ballet will present the World Premiere of "Caliban"~a rock ballet inspired by William Shakespeare's The Tempest~at Jones Hall for the Performing Arts on May 6, 7 and 8. The original musical score is being composed and will be performed by the Houston group "Saint Elmo's Fire" (formerly known as "Wheatfield"), with choreography by James Clouser, costumes by Sonja Zarek, and lighting by Jennifer Tipton. "The Tempest" is a story of magic, monsters, and an enchanted island set in a distant sea. Choreographer James Clouser takes a free hand to examine the earthy side of man in Houston ballet's innovative full-length production. pearL scnooL aay camp See below for locil information CT PATTI O'KANE, PRESIDENT, WEST UNIVERSITY NOW 201 MAIN. SUITE 636, 77002 jdme i cnru quo. 20 /:3oar>6ooDnn rnon-Pri. hihinq Piaa crips suulirining crapes 5116 caroLine nousuon. cexas 516-6002 12